PLATINUM2024

Chatham-Savannah Authority for the Homeless

When you need help finding your way.

aka CSAH or Homeless Authority   |   SAVANNAH, GA   |  https://www.homelessauthority.org

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Mission

The mission of Chatham Savannah Authority for the Homeless is to lead the development of sustainable community practices to reduce homelessness.

Notes from the nonprofit

Income surpluses in 2019-2020 were due to cash flow surrounding the construction of the Cove at Dundee permanent supportive housing for veterans experiencing homelessness. CSAH no longer serves as the developer for housing created to serve persons experiencing homelessness. We partner with Community Housing Services Agency, a non-profit CDFI, and its subsidiary CHSA Development to handle both financing and construction.

Ruling year info

1993

Executive Director

Jennifer Dulong

Main address

PO BOX 8936

SAVANNAH, GA 31412 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

58-1928701

NTEE code info

Human Service Organizations (P20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Over 700 persons experienced homelessness in Chatham County, and most are not chronically homeless. (PIT Count, 2023) CSAH counted 84 encampments where persons were living in places not meant for human habitation in 2023. Affordable housing is scarce in the Savannah MSA. Many people rent substandard housing for lack of affordable options. Forty percent of renters pay more than 30% of their income for housing. Homelessness is also a racial equity issue. Black people in Chatham County earn much less, on average, than their White peers ($22,213 vs. $41,883). Neighborhoods with more racial diversity continually experience higher rates of evictions. There are 28 evictions each DAY in Chatham County. (Eviction Lab, 2022). Around one third of chronically unsheltered persons struggle with mental illness. About half of all persons without shelter that we serve are episodically homeless (job or relationship loss) and 15% are recently released from prison.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Housing for Persons Experiencing Homelessness

CSAH increases the number of affordable housing units available in Chatham County for persons experiencing homelessness. Starting in 2015, CSAH began the Tiny House Project, which provides permanent supportive housing for veterans experiencing homelessness. With community support, the first veterans moved into the Cove at Dundee in 2019. Phase Four will be complete in 2023. CSAH partners with organizations like Community Housing Services Agency and Chatham County Affordable Housing Coalition to achieve its housing development goals.

CSAH is actively raising funds to acquire new affordable housing developments which will directly support ICH/CoC agencies, such as the new multi-use tiny home community, Dundee Cottages, adjacent to the Cove at Dundee. CSAH also manages the City 54 program, permanent supportive housing for persons with disabilities.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people
People with disabilities
Veterans

Street outreach staff serve persons living in places not meant for human habitation throughout Chatham County. Our PATH mental health outreach team was recognized by the State of Georgia’s DBHDD program as the “Best PATH Team in Georgia” in 2022.

Street outreach staff spend 90% of their time on the street, responding to referrals from business owners, police and ICH/CoC partner service providers. When unique challenges arise, CSAH receives the referral to curate creative solutions.

This work is never linear. Homeless friends and neighbors each have unique sets of circumstances and backgrounds because of trauma, medical challenges, mental health diagnoses, addictions and active substance abuse, financial hardships, and legal challenges that led them to become homeless.

CSAH staff coordinates with local governments and agencies to conduct encampment removals periodically for health and safety reasons.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people

CSAH is the Lead Collaborative Applicant to HUD, coordinating all federal and state funded services to persons experiencing homelessness through the Interagency Council on Homelessness (formerly known as the Chatham Savannah Continuum of Care-IHC/CoC). CSAH provides services mandated by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) including:
• Coordinated Entry System
• Homeless Management Information System (HMIS) data collection and management
• Point in Time Count (PIT Count) to document the number of persons experiencing homelessness
• Unified Case Management for permanent supportive housing
• Technical assistance to ICH/CoC partners
• County-wide homelessness prevention services
• Education and advocacy with an emphasis on Housing First
• Response coordination during emergencies such as hurricanes and COVID-19.
• Rental assistance, self-sufficiency planning, and resource referrals for education, employment, food, shelter, and healthcare to ICH/CoC partner agencies.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people
Extremely poor people
Low-income people

Give Change That Counts is a campaign to strengthen the Chatham County community by reducing panhandling and establishing and supporting day centers throughout the area that provide safe havens and resource centers for those experiencing homelessness.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people
Economically disadvantaged people
Homeless people
Economically disadvantaged people

Where we work

Awards

Best PATH Team 2022

Georgia Department of Behavioral Health and Disabilities

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Total number of clients experiencing homelessness

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Lead Collaborative Agency: Interagency Council on Homelessness

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context Notes

Point in Time Count data

Number of households that obtain/retain permanent housing for at least 6 months

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Housing for Persons Experiencing Homelessness

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of houses built

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Homeless people, Veterans

Related Program

Housing for Persons Experiencing Homelessness

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

An additional 34 tiny homes for families with children exiting homelessness are expected to be completed in 2024.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our primary goal is to reduce the number of people experiencing the trauma of homelessness in Chatham County.

Our secondary goal is building partnerships among agencies providing services to persons experiencing homelessness, and ensure that agencies have adequate resources to accomplish their missions.

Finally, our third goal is to advocate for and invest in community resources needed by persons experiencing homelessness, such as permanent supportive housing, healthcare resources and affordable rentals for persons with low incomes.

CSAH’s 20-member staff also provides direct services to people experiencing homelessness. Our Unified Case Management system supports individuals living in permanent supportive housing units including City 54, the Austin House (EOA), Dutchtown (Union Mission), The Cove at Dundee (a tiny home community for veterans), and Safe Shelter. In addition, CSAH’s PATH mental health outreach team and Street Outreach team works directly with homeless community members who need increased services due to mental health diagnoses, active addictions, or various forms of substance abuse. We were named, “Best PATH Team in Georgia” last year by Georgia officials.

CSAH also provides self-sufficiency planning, and resource referrals for education, employment, food, shelter, mental health care, and healthcare to its ICH/CoC partner agencies.

The “Give Change that Counts / Streets to Stability” program educates the public about the negative effects of panhandling and provides positive alternatives. Digital donations support local day centers for families and children experiencing homelessness. This program also strengthens coordination of donated goods to the homeless population and service providers.

Over the past 30 years, we have helped thousands of people experiencing homelessness to connect with housing, healthcare and community resources.
STAFFING.
CSAH has 20 staff members in three main divisions. The first is administrative services provided to the Interagency Council on Homelessness / Continuum of Care for Savannah. This includes the coordinated entry services, data collection and management of HMIS database, and unified case management for permanent supportive housing. The second division provides housing services, maintenance and security for housing developments owned or managed under contract by CSAH and invests in future housing developments through our partnerships with local organizations. The third division is street outreach, including our award-winning PATH team which provides intervention, referrals and case management for persons experiencing homelessness.

FACILITIES. Our offices are located at 761 Wheaton Street in Savannah, which is rented by CSAH from the City of Savannah Department of Family and Child Services. We have use of office space as well as a dedicated resource center.

CSAH is the owner and operator of the Cove at Dundee permanent supportive housing for veterans, which includes 34 tiny houses, a medical clinic and small resource cottage. CSAH also owns and rents a duplex to two families experiencing homelessness. CSAH also manages the City 54 permanent supportive housing under contract with the City of Savannah. In 2023, a new development of 40 tiny homes is being constructed called Dundee Cottages. CSAH will be the owner and operator of these units which will shelter families with children experiencing homelessness.

In 2022, 5,398 individuals received services overall through the ICH/CoC. We are also proud to report that 692 individuals entered permanent supportive housing in 2022, thanks to the hard work and collaboration of the ICH/CoC. In 2022, CSAH provided services to 1,555 distinct individuals experiencing homelessness, through its specialized programs for case management and street outreach.

CSAH continues to support service provider collaboration and leverage funding resources to support eviction prevention. The current CES is evolving to a “no wrong doors” approach with the help of partner agencies. This will ensure that person experiencing or at risk of homelessness can initiate services at up to 17 sites throughout Coastal Georgia instead of only at CSAH’s office. This CES redevelopment resulted in stronger collaboration among all agencies who share our mission.

CSAH’s investments in HMIS data collection processes improved data quality by 31.5% in the past year. (The HMIS data fidelity checks that compare information to identify anomalies.) The Point in Time Count in January 2023 was the most accurate in recent history and fully conformed to HUD requirements. In short – every person counted, and CoC member agencies will be able to provide more targeted support as a result.

The street outreach team (PATH) was increased by three full-time staff and one vehicle to better support the growing number of people who are unsheltered. A new day center was opened by CoC partner Union Mission, which contributed to more effective street outreach in 2022. CSAH’s team was awarded “PATH Team of the Year” by the State of Georgia.

CSAH is the lead collaborative applicant for the Interagency Council on Homelessness/Continuum of Care in Chatham County. Their goal is also our goal: “functional zero.” Functional zero means that any person or household experiencing homelessness or at risk for homelessness will be quickly connected with support services to address the housing crisis. This would technically mean that there would be zero homeless people in our community, only people in the process of receiving preventive or transitional services.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback

Financials

Chatham-Savannah Authority for the Homeless
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Chatham-Savannah Authority for the Homeless

Board of directors
as of 04/04/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

James Smith

JTVS Builders, Inc.

Timothy Blanco

Chatham Insurance

Jennifer Davenport

Savannah Area Chamber of Commerce

Dr. Rena Douse

JC Lewis Healthcare, Inc.

Jenny Gentry

Chase Bank

Meg Heap

Former District Attorney for Georgia's Eastern Judicial Circuit

Sharon Hill

Savannah Chatham Public School System

Darnell Johnson

Person with lived experience of homelessness, and Veteran

Christopher Middleton

Cox, Rodman & Middleton, LLC

Kurtis Purtee

Savannah City Council, 6th DIstrict

James Mitchell

Hunter Army Airfield

Rev. Charles Roberson, Sr.

Kingdom Life Christian Fellowship

Maj. Shanita Young

Savannah Police Department

Tom Taylor

Person with lived experience of homelessness

Jacqueline Awe

Savannah State University

Tina Roberti

Retired, founding member JC Lewis Healthcare

Elizabeth Seeger

Downtown Savannah Business Owner (Satchel)

Linda Wilder-Bryan

Savannah City Council, 3rd District

Miriam Munn

Savannah Chatham County Public School System

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 4/4/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 05/11/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.