LEXINGTON RESCUE MISSION INC

Reaching Hearts, Changing Lives

Lexington, KY   |  www.lexingtonrescue.org

Mission

Lexington Rescue Mission exists to serve and glorify God through Christ-centered ministry that meets the physical, emotional and spiritual needs of hurting people in the greater Lexington area.

Ruling year info

2001

Executive Director

Mrs. Laura E. Carr

Main address

P.O. Box 1050

Lexington, KY 40588 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

61-1387338

NTEE code info

Christian (X20)

Homeless Services/Centers (P85)

Employment Procurement Assistance and Job Training (J20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Lexington Rescue Mission works to address poverty and the issues that stem from it: hunger, homelessness, unemployment, incarceration, and hopelessness. In Lexington, 16.8% of residents live in poverty, and in our neighborhood, 30.7% of residents live in poverty. Not having enough access to food is just one symptom of poverty. According to Feeding America's Map the Meal Gap 2020 report, 40,400 people in Lexington have limited or uncertain access to enough food. Many of those struggling with hunger are also unemployed or underemployed. In the Fayette County Labor Market Area, approximately 4.3% of workers are unemployed, and those who often face the biggest hurdles to employment are those leaving jail or prison. An average of 979 men and women return to Fayette County from incarceration each year, needing significant help finding jobs and housing. Homelessness is also prevalent in Lexington, with 689 people currently experiencing homelessness in our community, many for the first time.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Outreach Center

Free, hot lunches are served to the hungry six days a week. Guests may meet with our Resource Coordinator for help with basic needs, including clothing, hygiene, household supplies, prescriptions, food pantry referrals, and transportation. Additionally, we offer free laundry service for homeless guests who are not living in shelters and do not have access to laundry. Our Resource Coordinator is also available to meet with guests by appointment for extended help in setting and achieving goals for self-sufficiency. Our housing counselor provides help finding affordable housing, rent assistance, and after-care to move homeless families into affordable housing. Guests who want to grow in their relationship with God may attend chapel services, Steady Hands, or meet with a pastoral counselor.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Homeless people

Our Restorative Services provides transitional housing to men and women who are homeless, leaving incarceration or have graduated from an addiction treatment program. We provide a safe place where these residents can practice recovery principles, be held accountable and learn how to live a sober, healthy life. We provide accountability to help residents progress in their commitment to living out positive change in their lives. It is essential that each resident be willing to be responsible through demonstrating accountability by submitting verification of attendance at required meetings, group studies, and church. We also conduct random drug and breathalyzer tests for alcohol. Residents are not alone in our transitional homes. They have access to a broad array of services offered by the Mission, including food and clothing, employment training and job placement, transportation, and assistance accessing public benefits. We provide case management and pastoral counseling.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people
Substance abusers
Ex-offenders

Jobs for Life helps job-seekers prepare for, find, and maintain lasting employment. We teach Jobs for Life classes to anyone is who is unemployed or underemployed. This Biblically-based course helps job-seekers develop the job skills and character qualities that will set them apart from other job applicants and make them successful in any workplace.  We also assist participants in their job search, including helping them obtain IDs, bus passes, gas cards, interview attire, work clothing and other necessities. Advance Lexington, our staffing service, contracts with local employers to provide temporary paid work to graduates of Jobs for Life and helps them secure permanent employment.

Population(s) Served
Unemployed people
Economically disadvantaged people

Breaking Chains provides training and support to assist incarcerated men and women in making a smooth transition into the community. We work with those who are currently and formerly incarcerated, offering our classes and case management to inmates at Fayette County Detention Center, Woodford County Detention Center, Jessamine County Detention Center, Blackburn Correctional Complex, and Northpoint Training Center.  Our classes include The Genesis Process and Jobs for Life. The Genesis Process is 14-week class that addresses a fundamental struggle in life: the struggle to change. The process identifies the fears that drive our self-destructive behaviors and emotions and helps resolve them so people can find true and lasting freedom. Jobs for Life is a 14-week course helps train men and women in the job skills and character qualities that prepare them for success in the workforce. Our re-entry case manager and housing counselor help ex-offenders upon their release connect with housing and employment, reconnect with family, and maintain sobriety.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Ex-offenders
Offenders

Advance Lexington is our staffing service that provides job placement to graduates of Jobs for Life and Jubilee Jobs. We contract with local employers, who provide temporary, paid work assignments to participants. Our staff provides the support these participants need to obtain and maintain employment and assists them in finding permanent employment. We also operate an in-house lawn care service that employs hard-to-place clients in immediate jobs.

Population(s) Served
Unemployed people
Economically disadvantaged people

Where we work

Accreditations

Evangelical Council for Financial Accountability (ECFA) 2021

Citygate Network 2021

Awards

Best Christian Workplace 2020

Best Christian Workplaces Institute

Nonprofit Community Impact 2021

Commerce Lexington

Affiliations & memberships

Association of Gospel Rescue Missions (AGRM) 2001

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of participants who gain employment

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Unemployed people

Related Program

Jobs for Life

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

In 2021, we placed 97 people in 119 jobs. Their average work hours per week were 35-39 and the average wage was $12.08. We also taught 206 people employment skills and graduated 39 from Jobs for Life.

Number of donors retained

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

As of December 31, 2021, we had 7,118 active donors (donors who had given in the last 12 months).

Total number of arrests across clients

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Incarcerated people

Related Program

Breaking Chains

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context Notes

We assisted 145 men and women who had been released from incarceration, including providing 697 case management sessions, and 9 of them were re-arrested.

Number of clients living independently

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Homeless people

Related Program

Outreach Center

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Our Homeless Intervention Program and Rapid Rehousing Programs moved 54 homeless households, including 58 adults and 15 children, into permanent housing.

Number of meals served or provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people, Homeless people, Unemployed people

Related Program

Outreach Center

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We serve free breakfast and lunch Monday through Saturday at our Outreach Center.

Number of people reached with the Gospel of Jesus Christ

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Outreach Center

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

In 2021, 11 people came to chapel services for 1,193 visits, 120 people came to our discipleship group, Steady Hands, for 507 visits, and 31 people came for pastoral counseling for 56 sessions.

Number of clients in residential care

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Men and boys, Homeless people, Substance abusers, Women and girls

Related Program

Restorative Services

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

In 2021, we housed 133 men at our transitional homes, The Potter's House and House of Hope, and we housed 22 women at our transitional home, Grace Place.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

1) People will take steps out of poverty through financial stability. Individuals and families struggling to make ends meet, living paycheck to paycheck, are often one emergency away from homelessness. Many of these folks find their way to the Mission for help with food, clothing, housing or other necessities. We work to provide immediate relief, but, more importantly, we help people look at their situation and see where they could make changes to become more stable. We help our guests create an individual plan and support them as they work toward financial stability.  2) People will transition from homelessness to housing. Homeless men and women who are leaving an institutional setting -- whether it's jail, a shelter, or a substance abuse recovery program -- often struggle to manage life on their own. We offer transitional housing and support to help these men and women make a successful transition into independent living. 3) People will secure and maintain lasting employment. Unemployment lies at the core of poverty and robs people of their dignity. We work to equip unemployed men and women for lasting employment and restore their dignity.  4) People will re-enter the community upon release. Inmates who are leaving incarceration are often ill-equipped to navigate the challenges of returning home. Starting while they are in jail and continuing after they are released, we come alongside men and women to offer the training, guidance and support that they need to make a successful transition back into the community.

We have the following three overall strategies for meeting our goals: 1) Lexington Rescue Mission offers a variety of programs that alleviate the effects of poverty while building relationships that can lead to real and lasting change in people's lives. Whether people come to our Outreach Center for a hot meal, a warm coat, financial assistance, or help finding housing, they find staff and volunteers who will listen to and care about them. Because of our hospitality-focused strategy, our guests invite us into their lives to help them become more stable. 2) Lexington Rescue Mission operates three transitional homes: The Potter's House, The House of Hope, and Grace Place. Our staff provides residents with support and accountability to help them make a successful transition to independent living. Residents are offered a broad array of services to help them get back on their feet, including food and clothing, employment training and placement, health care, and assistance accessing public benefits. The house staff also provide case management and pastoral counseling to help residents set and achieve their goals. To help residents progress in making positive changes, our staff holds them accountable to their commitments. These include sobriety, finding employment, developing and keeping a budget, attending meetings, and growing spiritually. Our transitional living program incorporates best practices set by our peers in the Citygate Network, through which we are accredited. 3) Lexington Rescue Mission trains and connects job-seekers to employment through Jobs for Life and Advance Lexington. Jobs for Life is a comprehensive job training course that teaches employment skills and character qualities from a Biblical perspective. Participants also receive assistance in their job search, including help obtaining IDs, bus passes, gas cards, interview attire, work clothing and other necessities. Jobs for Life graduates are eligible to enroll in Advance Lexington, our staffing services that contracts with local employers to provide temporary paid work for graduates of Jobs for Life and assists each person in making the transition to permanent employment. 4) Our re-entry program, Breaking Chains, provides training and support to assist incarcerated men and women in making a smooth transition into the community. We work with those who are currently and formerly incarcerated, offering our case management to inmates at Fayette, Jessamine and Woodford County jails, Northpoint Training Center, and to those on probation or parole. We also offer classes -- Jobs for Life and The Genesis Process -- to inmates in Fayette, Jessamine, and Woodford County Detention Centers as well as Blackburn Correctional Complex and Northpoint Training Center. In addition to its partnerships with local jails, Breaking Chains partners with Fayette County Drug Court, U.S. Probation and Parole, and Dismas Charities.

Founded in 2001, Lexington Rescue Mission has a broad base of support in the community, with 7,800 donors actively supporting the ministry in the last 12 months. Giving has grown from $1,561,963 in 2017 to $2,825,946 in 2020. Our board, staff, and volunteers are committed to excellence and serving according to the highest standards set by our peers, which is why our organization is accredited by Citygate Network and the Evangelical Council for Financial Accountability (ECFA). We value working with other organizations that have a stake in our clients' success and can help complete the continuum of care needed by our clients. Our Executive Director, Laura Carr, serves as the Chair for the Fayette County Emergency Food and Shelter Board. We are also active members of the Lexington-Fayette Continuum of Care, Health Re-Entry Kentucky, the Mayor's Partners in Workforce Development, the Homeless and Housing Coalition of Kentucky, and the ROSM network. We are also members of the Kentucky Nonprofit Network, the Lexington Nonprofit Coalition, and Commerce Lexington.

In 2020, our Board of Directors approved a five-year strategic plan that focuses on growing in excellence, including increasing stability, guarding against mission drift, better engaging the local Church in missions, and providing a higher quality and deeper level of care to those we serve at the Lexington Rescue Mission.

We have already accomplished our financial goals of building cash reserves, paying off our debt, and diversifying our revenue. Our social enterprise, Advance Lexington, has grown significantly in the last year as we have added business partners and launched a lawn care service, allowing us to increase our earned revenue. We have also accomplished one of our fundraising goals of increasing our donor base, which has grown by over 1,000 active donors in 2020. We have converted our AmeriCorps VISTA position to a staff position and plan to convert our AmeriCorps housing counselor position to a staff position in 2021, increasing consistency and stability for our clients. We also hired a full-time re-entry mentor coordinator in 2021 to strengthen our mentoring program. Additionally, we have developed new partnerships with non-profits, schools, and churches to better serve our clients.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    We serve people struggling with poverty and homelessness. According to our 2021 Snapshot Survey of 146 clients, 64.4% said they are currently homeless and 36.3% are not homeless. Of those who were homeless, 20% have been homeless for less than 3 months, 6.85% have been homeless for 3-6 months, 11.64% have been homeless for six months to one year and 28% have been homeless for more than one year. The majority of those we serve (84%) have been incarcerated, and 30.1% have experienced violence in the last year. Mental health and addiction are common among our clients, with 37% self-reporting a diagnosed mental illness, 4.11% reporting an undiagnosed mental illness, and 47% reporting a drug or alcohol addiction. Ten percent of our clients were veterans.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Paper surveys, Case management notes, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    We are looking to expand our outreach services to reach more people, including potentially re-locating our Outreach Center, so we asked our clients if they would still be able to access our services if we re-located to various parts of the city that are high in poverty and under-served. According to our Snapshot Survey results, 66% of participants stated that they would be able to come if the Mission were in the Downtown area, 40.4% would come if the Mission were in the East End area, 29.4% would come if the Mission was on Winchester Road and 37% would come if the Mission was on Russell Cave Road. Using this information, we are focusing our search for another property on the downtown area.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    It gives our clients more input into how we serve them and, hopefully, improves their level of satisfaction with our services. For example, we conduct surveys of our community meal guests to ask them about what they like, don't like, and would like to change with our meals. We also ask what their favorite menu items are so we can be sure to prioritize those. Using this feedback, we have increased the number of days we are serving, added hot breakfasts, and served favorite meals more often.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time,

Financials

LEXINGTON RESCUE MISSION INC
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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LEXINGTON RESCUE MISSION INC

Board of directors
as of 2/15/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Gary Loucks

Central Bank

Term: 2021 - 2021

Wayne Logan

Netgain Technologies

Gary Loucks

Central Bank

Rob McBride

Guardian Savings Bank

Jeff Yeary

H&W Management

Elizabeth Royse

Netgain Technologies

Kaleb Heitzman

Consulting in the Ministry & Online World

Tim Kitts

The Housing Authority of Danville

Mark Dunn

Broadway Christian Church

Jacquelin Murphy

The Whitaker Foundation

Karen Venis

Sayre Christian Village

Allan Alvarez

Church of the Savior

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 02/15/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 02/15/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.