Human Services

Retreat, Inc.

Where violence ends and hope begins.

aka The Retreat   |   East Hampton, NY   |  www.allagainstabuse.org

Mission

The mission of the Retreat is to provide safety, shelter and support for victims of domestic abuse and to break the cycle of family violence.

Ruling year info

1988

Executive Director

Loretta K Davis

Main address

13 Goodfriend Dr

East Hampton, NY 11937 USA

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EIN

11-2862256

Cause area (NTEE code) info

Family Violence Shelters and Services (P43)

Victims' Services (P62)

Rape Victim Services (F42)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

While we can’t change what’s going on in the world, we can make a difference! For those who have suffered from abuse, the issues do not pause or take a break even during the declared National Emergency for COVID-19. In fact, those issues may become more difficult to manage. In this time of crisis, The Retreat is here for anyone in need of assistance. - The 24-hour Hotline is operational, with access to multiple languages. (631)329-2200 or Deaf Crisis Line at VP (321)800-3323 - Our counselors are available for phone sessions. - Advocates are working remotely with clients and the courts. Orders of Protection are being still being granted by courts and enforced. - Our emergency shelter remains operational, with safety protocols in place. - Many of our administrative functions are being done by employees working from home. If you call the main office (631)329-4398, please leave a message and someone will return your call shortly or email info@theretreatinc.org.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Overall Summary of Services

The Retreat's Non-Residential services include a 24-Hour Hotline, Legal Advocacy, Counseling, Support Groups, Police Department Incident Report Response, Information and Referrals, Community Education/Outreach, Crime Victim's Assistance, In-School Education/Prevention Programs, a Batterers Intervention Program, and a Self-Sufficiency Program.

The Retreat's 18 bed shelter is staffed around the clock for access at all times. It provides housing for women and their children for up to 90 days. Services at the shelter include legal advocacy, personal advocacy with regard to financial, housing, medical needs, transportation, child care, group and individual counseling, and a variety of ancillary programs such as nutrition, yoga, parenting, and enrichment programs for the children.

The Retreat provides more than 15,000 services each year. Each year the Retreat solicits all levels of government to support our programs, and unfortunately each year the funding is cut. To supplement these cuts, the Retreat solicits a variety of foundations that support domestic violence causes. The Retreat also does a tremendous amount of fundraising which accounts for approximately 1/3rd of the annual budget.

Population(s) Served
General/Unspecified

Telephone crisis intervention is available 24 hours per day. Staff and trained volunteers link callers to the shelter, outreach services, police, and emergency health services, while providing supportive listening, basic information, and referrals.

Population(s) Served
Adults

The emergency shelter provides housing for 18 adults and children for an up to 90-day length of stay. Services available at the shelter include counseling, legal advocacy, education, and case management, among others.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth (0-19 years)

Individual and group counseling is provided for adults and children. Clients take control of their lives, make positive changes without guilt and begin to heal. Group counseling combines education about abuse with mutual support.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth (0-19 years)

Trained legal advocates accompany victims to court, explain the legal process, and assist in obtaining orders of protection, stay away orders and custody.

Population(s) Served
Adults

In-school education programs effectively help children and teenagers build self-esteem while enabling them to identify and understand how to deal with problem situations. We educate the community via workshops and presentations about domestic violence.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth (0-19 years)
Adults

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of participants who would recommend program to others

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Overall Summary of Services

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Word of mouth is the most prevalent way survivors find The Retreat. Data from surveys of adult clients receiving counseling, advocacy or shelter. Result is % of clients who would recommend the program

Percentage of people who strongly agree that services increased overall well-being.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Overall Summary of Services

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Feeling hopeful and positive about the future are key indicators of success for victim of abuse. Data is from surveys of adult clients who receive counseling, advocacy or emergency shelter.

Percentage of people that feel they are better able to effectively parent their child(ren).

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults,Parents

Related Program

Overall Summary of Services

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The Retreat has been steadily adding parenting skills and family counseling to our wide array of programs. The main focus started in our Emergency Shelter and has since been expanded.

Percentage of people who know more ways to plan for safety.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Overall Summary of Services

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

A life-saving component of planning for victims is determining key factors and resources for their safety. In 2018, The Retreat concentrated on bring safety planning into every client meeting.

Number of donors retained

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

How effectively we are keeping donors active and engaged.

Number of new donors

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

How well The Retreat is reaching new donors and getting them to support our mission.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Charting impact

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

What is the organization aiming to accomplish?

The Retreat provides comprehensive services to survivors of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, adult sex trafficking, and stalking.<br/><br/>Our overall goal is to enable individuals and their children impacted by violence and abuse to better understand the nature of abusive relationships and to utilize the tools and services that will allow them to safely exit or, in some cases, safely remain in those relationships. The Retreat also raises awareness within the communities we serve and works to prevent domestic violence and sexual assault by providing young people with information and tools that help them recognize the difference between healthy and unhealthy relationships and behaviors.<br/>When you support The Retreat, you support educating our community about intimate partner violence, counseling for those who have been in violent relationships, legal advocacy for those in need of assistance, and emergency shelter for those who have nowhere else to go.

All of our services are free of charge and confidential. We are committed to meeting the needs of victims and their families at each level of their journey. To that end, we offer a comprehensive list of services. Our other focus is on preventing abuse before it occurs, through education.<br/><br/>The Retreat utilizes a multi-channeled approach to meet individual needs and implement community prevention strategies.<br/><br/>Intervention: <br/>• 24/7 Emergency Hotline and Shelter.<br/>• Collaborations with local police, medical providers, other DV agencies, other health & human service providers, governmental agencies, and local schools and colleges,<br/>• Specialized training for staff working with vulnerable populations including seniors, children and youth, and limited English speaking victims.<br/><br/>Prevention:<br/>• Through in-school education, from 3rd Grade through college level, to change the social norm.<br/>• Community presentations and partnerships to educate the public in healthy relationships and safe bystander intervention.

The Retreat is the only agency serving Long Island's East End with domestic violence services: Hotline Services – Telephone crisis intervention is available 24 hours per day. Staff and trained volunteers link callers to the shelter, outreach services, police, and emergency health services, while providing supportive listening, basic information, and referrals. Counseling – Individual and group counseling is provided for adults and children. Clients take control of their lives, make positive changes without guilt and begin to heal. Group counseling combines education about abuse with mutual support. Legal Advocacy – Trained legal advocates accompany victims to court, explain the legal process, and assist in obtaining orders of protection, stay away orders and custody. Residential Services – The emergency shelter provides housing for 18 adults and children for an up to 90-day length of stay. Services available at the shelter include counseling, legal advocacy, education, and case management, among others. Crime Victim Assistance – The Retreat provides immediate confidential response and assistance to victims of domestic violence. In addition, we provide Rape and Sexual Assault Services, Children's Services, Support Groups, and Information & Referrals. Violence Prevention and Education –In-school education programs effectively help students to build self-esteem while enabling them to identify and understand how to deal with problem situations. We educate the community via workshops and presentations. Additional Education Programs include: • Suffolk County Fatherhood Initiative: Assisting at-risk fathers with parenting and partnership skills to prevent incidences of family/domestic abuse and overcome challenges that inhibit men from being responsible fathers and supportive intimate partners. • Take Charge: Individualized training programs providing career guidance, job placement, and financial empowerment education. • SHARP: Anti-violence re-education program that helps abusers to take full responsibility and accountability for abusive behavior and teaches new strategies to deal with relationship issues. • Teen Leadership Project: Preventing abuse and promoting respect in all relationships and expanding prevention of all relationship abuse including bullying, harassment, sexual assault and teen dating violence. • Enough is Enough: Statewide program in New York aimed at preventing all types of violence in the college population. • Partners in Prevention: A collaborative effort between The Retreat and LI Against Domestic Violence, this initiative focuses on the prevention of sexual assault of youth and young adults involved in foster care, substance abuse treatment, and developmental disabilities communities. The Retreat is run by professional social workers, teachers, legal advocates and a staff trained to meet the needs of people in crisis. Our Executive Director is a a former Judge, and many of the managerial staff hold advanced degrees.

The Retreat surveys clients to ensure that we are providing quality services. In 2017:<br/>• 90% of our clients report increased overall wellbeing after working with The Retreat.<br/>• 90% of our clients report that after working with The Retreat they now know more ways to plan for their safety. <br/>• 90% feel they are better able to effectively parent their child(ren). <br/>• 90% report that after working with The Retreat's staff and volunteers they now know more resources available in the community. <br/>• 90% report that they would refer a friend or family member to The Retreat

In 2019, The Retreat recived 3476 hotline calls, provided 4906 safe night in our emergency shelter, assisted with 1184 legal services PLUS an 5,087 students in local schools and 2,756 college students participated in our prevention education programs, AND over Retreat Staff presented at 181 outreach events. In 2020, our goals include: • upgrade website and complete the internal and external communications/public awareness plan; • expand fund development to meet the resource needs of serving victims of domestic violence and preventing it for future generations; • implement training to more effectively work with diverse populations including LGBTQ, people of color, immigrants, human trafficking victims, elderly and disabled; • and continue to expand cross-system collaboration to address social change activities.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is the organization collecting feedback?

    We regularly collect feedback through: electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), paper surveys, case management notes, community meetings/town halls, constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees, suggestion box/email.

  • How is the organization using feedback?

    We use feedback to: to identify and remedy poor client service experiences, to identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, to make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, to inform the development of new programs/projects, to identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, to strengthen relationships with the people we serve.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    We share feedback with: the people we serve, our staff, our board, our funders, our community partners.

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to: it is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, it is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection.

Financials

Retreat, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Retreat, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 4/26/2020
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Claudia Pilato

Bridgehampton National Bank


Board co-chair

Francesca Odell

Cleary Gotlieb

Steven Bergerson

Ayse Kenmore

Stephen Latham

Senior Partner; Twomey, Latham, Shea, Kelley, Dubin & Quartararo, LLP

Francesca Odell

Partner, Cleary Gottlieb

Ellie Kurrus

Andrew Stern

Managing Partner; YorkBridge Wealth Partners

Anastasia Karloutsos

Georgina Rattenni

Daniel Van Arsdale, DO

Stonybrook/Southampton Hospital

Vivienne Keegan

Ana Stuckart

M&T Bank

Maritza Guichay

Julie Hatfield

Wright & Co.

Claudia Pilato

Owner, Pilato Marketing

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 04/22/2020

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 04/22/2020

Policies and practices developed in partnership with Equity in the Center, a project that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems within the social sector to increase racial equity. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.

Keywords

Domestic Violence, Abuse, Family Violence, Violence Prevention, Education, Shelter, Advocacy, Hotline