Youth Development

Junior Achievement of New York, Inc.

Empowering young people to own their economic success

aka JA New York   |   New York, NY   |  http://www.jany.org

Mission

At Junior Achievement of New York, we give young people the knowledge and skills they need to own their economic success, plan for their future, and make smart academic and economic choices.

Ruling year info

1994

President and CEO

Mr. Joseph A. Peri

Main address

420 Lexington Avenue Suite 205

New York, NY 10170 USA

Show more addresses

Formerly known as

JANY

EIN

13-3031828

Cause area (NTEE code) info

Business, Youth Development (O53)

Other Youth Development N.E.C. (O99)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Junior Achievement of New York is dedicated to giving young people the knowledge and skills they need to own their economic success, plan for their futures, and make smart academic and economic choices. JA's programs—in the core content areas of work readiness, entrepreneurship and financial literacy—ignite the spark in young people to experience and realize the opportunities and realities of work and life in the 21st century.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

JA Mobile Finance Park

JA Finance Park helps students build a foundation upon which they can make intelligent financial decisions that last a lifetime, including decisions related to income, expenses, savings, and credit. The JA Finance Park program is composed of 13 required teacher-taught, in-class lessons. It culminates in a hands-on budgeting simulation that is implemented either at a JA Finance Park facility, mobile unit, or virtual site. Additional extension activities are available for each lesson topic. Lessons are offered in a traditional classroom presentation format designed for middle-grade students, and in a Project-Based Learning (PBL) format created for high school students. Both provide educators a method of delivery that will best meet the needs of their students. (Grades 7-12)

Population(s) Served
Adolescents (13-19 years)

Local program only. The JA New York Business Plan Competition (BPC) is an intensive entrepreneurship education experience for high school students. Since its inception in 2008, over 7,500 high school students have received valuable business and entrepreneurship education. Students work in small teams to create a viable business plan for a product or service. Several rounds of online and live competition determine the top three teams to receive cash prize awards and a trophy for their school. First, second, and third place prizes totaling nearly $220,000 since the program's inception have been awarded to competitors who presented the strongest, most creative, and innovative business plans. Past participants have gone on to create successful business enterprises of their own.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents (13-19 years)

JA Job Shadow prepares students to be entrepreneurial thinkers in their approach to work. In-class sessions prepare students for a visit to a professional work environment, where they will face a series of challenges administered by their workplace hosts. Students learn how to research career opportunities and the skills needed to land and keep their dream job. (Grades 9-12)

Population(s) Served
Adolescents (13-19 years)

JA New York High School Heroes program provides service-learning and leadership development opportunities to high school students in their communities. High School Hero Students volunteer in teams of 2-3 in a local classroom to teach a fun and interactive JA program for the duration of one day.

Population(s) Served
K-12 (5-19 years)

JA Ourselves uses storybook characters in read-aloud and hands-on activities to introduce the role people play in an economy. Through engaging, volunteer-led activities, young students learn about individual choices, money, the importance of saving and giving, and the value of work. (Kindergarten)

Population(s) Served
K-12 (5-19 years)

JA Our Families explains how family members' jobs and businesses contribute to the well-being of the family and of the community. The program introduces the concept of needs and wants and explores the ways families plan for and acquire goods and services. Students analyze their own skills to determine ways they can support their families. (Grade 1)

Population(s) Served
K-12 (5-19 years)

JA Our Community uses posters and games to offer practical information about businesses and the many jobs those businesses offer in a community. Students explore production methods through a simulation game, and they learn about taxes, decision making, and how money flows in an economy. (Grade 2)

Population(s) Served
K-12 (5-19 years)

JA Our City featuring Cha-Ching introduces students to financial literacy and learning objectives for third–grade social studies, including how people manage their money and the importance of economic exchange within a city. (Grade 3)

Population(s) Served
K-12 (5-19 years)

JA Our Region introduces students to entrepreneurship and how entrepreneurs use resources to produce goods and services in a region. Students operate a hypothetical hot dog stand to understand the fundamental tasks performed by a business owner and to track the revenue and expenses of a business. (Grade 4)

Population(s) Served
K-12 (5-19 years)

JA Our Nation provides practical information about the need for employees who can meet the demands of the 21st century job market, particularly high-growth, high-demand jobs. By program's end, students will understand the skills, especially in science, technology, engineering, and math, that will make their futures brighter. (Grade 5)

Population(s) Served
K-12 (5-19 years)

JA More than Money introduces students to financial literacy and entrepreneurship, and to social studies learning objectives that include money-management skills, goods and services, and global markets. Through hands-on activities and a JA cast of characters serving as symbols for financial literacy and entrepreneurship concepts, students will learn a practical approach to starting a business and making smart decisions about managing money. (Grades 3-5)

Population(s) Served
K-12 (5-19 years)

JA It's My Business! encourages students to use critical thinking to learn entrepreneurial skills. Those skills include knowing customers' wants and needs, launching effective marketing, and creating detailed business plans. By examining the characteristics of successful entrepreneurs, students learn that a belief in one's self can make positive things happen in life. (Grades 6-8)

Population(s) Served
K-12 (5-19 years)

JA Global Marketplace takes students on a spin around the world. Students learn the products they use every day, like their backpacks and sneakers, might use raw material from one country, be assembled in another, and sold from Peking to Chicago. The program helps students understand how goods flow through various economies and the effect globalization has on their lives. (Grades 6-8)

Population(s) Served
K-12 (5-19 years)

JA Economics for Success gives students the information needed to build strong personal finances, a cornerstone to a happy, secure life. Students learn the importance of exploring career options based on their skills, interests, and values. They also learn about spending money within a budget; saving and investing wisely; and using credit cautiously. (Grades 6-8)

Population(s) Served
K-12 (5-19 years)

JA Company Program unlocks the innate ability in high school students to fill a need or solve a problem in their community by launching a business venture and unleashing their entrepreneurial spirit. The program focuses on Company Ops, the majority of meeting time, where students build and manage their business. Meeting-specific, student-friendly materials and resources increase student interaction and emphasize JA’s experiential approach to learning. (Grades 9-12)

Population(s) Served
Adolescents (13-19 years)

JA Career Success equips students with the knowledge required to get and keep a job in high-growth industries. Students will explore the crucial workplace skills employers seek but often find lacking in young employees. Students also will learn about valuable tools to find that perfect job, including resumes, cover letters, and interviewing techniques. (Grades 9-12)

Population(s) Served
Adolescents (13-19 years)

JA Be Entrepreneurial challenges students, through interactive classroom activities, to start their own entrepreneurial venture while still in high school. The program provides useful, practical content to assist teens in the transition from being students to productive, contributing members of society. (Grades 9-12)

Population(s) Served
Adolescents (13-19 years)

JA Personal Finance explores the fundamental elements of personal finances: earnings, saving and investing, budgeting, credit, risk management, and giving. Students apply these elements to a personal financial plan that allows them to set specific goals for their lifelong financial needs and desired quality of life. (Grades 9-12)

Population(s) Served
Adolescents (13-19 years)

Local program only. Discusses important college readiness topics including options for post-secondary education, planning a budget, and making a personalized college action plan. Three volunteer-led sessions can be completed at the school or a host company

Population(s) Served
Adolescents (13-19 years)

JA It’s My Future provides practical information about preparing for the working world. Students learn about career clusters, high-growth jobs, career planning, and creating a personal brand. And, through a scavenger hunt, they are introduced to the basic aspects of job hunting. (Grades 6-8)

Population(s) Served
K-12 (5-19 years)

JA It's My Business! encourages students to use critical thinking to learn entrepreneurial skills. Those skills include knowing customers' wants and needs, launching effective marketing, and creating detailed business plans. By examining the characteristics of successful entrepreneurs, students learn that a belief in one's self can make positive things happen in life. (Grades 6-8)

Population(s) Served
K-12 (5-19 years)

JA Economics reinforces concepts of micro- and macro-economics by having students explore the basic characteristics of the U.S. economic system and how economic principles influence business decisions. It also introduces students to consumer issues, such as saving, investing, and taxation. (Grades 11-12)

Population(s) Served
Adolescents (13-19 years)

Where we work

Accreditations

BBBSA 2012

Awards

5 Star Award 2019

Junior Achievement USA

Affiliations & memberships

Junior Achievement Worldwide 1929

Junior Achievement USA 1929

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of participants engaged in programs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth (0-19 years)

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of volunteers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of youth who volunteer/participate in community service

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents (13-19 years)

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Charting impact

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

What is the organization aiming to accomplish?

Junior Achievement of New York helps K-12 students learn and apply skills in entrepreneurship, financial literacy and workforce readiness to foster business growth and global competitiveness. To commemorate the centennial of Junior Achievement USA in 2019, we plan to expand our reach to serve 100,000 students.

1. Redefine the Student Impact Model (a) Prioritize and Sequence JA New York Curriculum by: (b) Segment Schools and Tailor Engagement Strategies (c) Develop Tools and Techniques to Support Program Delivery 2. Create A highly Differentiated Presence in the Community Evolution of our student impact model is critical for our continued success, BUT not sufficient to achieve our targeted number of high-impact student touch-points. • JA New York knows that high touch, high impact program delivery drives student results and donor engagement • Signature programming like the Mobile Finance Park model creates an opportunity to deliver high quality programming and take our brand and offerings outside the schools and into the broader community in the NYC Metro Area Strategic Goal: Develop a feasible business plan for Finance Park 2.0 including specifications for facility, anticipated student impact, and required financing and other implementation needs. 3. Transform Board Impact & Engagement • On-board 40-50 highly engaged Board Members who are actively engaged in steering, fundraising, and capability building • Develop and implement an enhanced committee and task force structure to provide meaningful engagement for all Board Members so they can take ownership of, and pride in, the future of JA New York 4. Augment Resource Development and Awareness/Visibility Efforts Development: Focus on two low to moderate complexity, high impact options High Net-Worth Individuals: • JA New York derives only 5% of funding from individual donors • High net worth individuals represent significant untapped potential • Develop individualized cultivation plans and leverage Board to execute • Anticipated impact: ~$25-50k/individual, 5 donors in 18-24mo, 10 in 36 mo\ Increase Private Foundation Grants: • JA New York derives <15% of funding from foundation grants • Private foundations represent a significant opportunity in the grant space • Bolster grant-writing capability and leverage programming metrics to build the skills, network, and messaging needed to build grant-based funding • Anticipated impact: $50 to $100K/grant, first new grant 18-24 months Awareness and Visibility JA New York currently has a limited digital / other media presence which limits community awareness and, as a result, donations. To increase awareness and visibility, JA New York will focus on building a fresh feel and sense of excitement through all communication channels: • Refresh and relaunch a robust website presence, reflective of the JA brand and our local program service communities of NYC and Long Island • Leverage social media presence and regular and consistent e-communications to increase community engagement • Develop a sustained PR campaign, and identify and capitalize on program and fundraising opportunities to generate media buzz

Over its nearly 90 year history, Junior Achievement of New York has already impacted hundreds of thousands of children through local initiatives positioned to align volunteers, financial resources, and community partners in projects that not only change individual lives, but the communities in which those individuals live and work. JA New York is able to deliver an outstanding commitment to financial education through engagement with a network that currently serves 90,000 K-12 students throughout New York City, Long Island and the Lower Hudson Valley. The goals and strategies of JA New York have been established to strengthen our local network and deepen the impact of JA programs and volunteer resources by positioning us as a solution to the underlying issues affecting the landscape of financial literacy, workforce readiness and local economic growth powered by business and innovation.

Our focus on consistent, high-quality program delivery will directly influence students in a measurable way. Strategic board governance, and consistent and relevant community engagement and marketing efforts, will bolster the value proposition that supports our long-term growth and sustainability vision.

Progress in each area to date is as follows: Redefine the Student Impact Model: Impact and Relevance of In Depth Programming • Adopted incentivized tiered partnership model for schools • All students in top-tier gold partnership schools receive at least one JA interaction per grade • Identification and tracking of key impact metrics • Grew program to 90,000 students per year • Create A highly differentiated learning experience for K-12 Students Transform Board Impact and Engagement • All board members assigned to and actively engaged in board sub-committee activities • Increase in board participation, accountability, and support Communications & Awareness Efforts • Increased engagement on our social media channels • Consistent and regular communications with community • Clear messages around new program model and impact • Leveraging anecdotes and data to support fundraising

Financials

Junior Achievement of New York, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Junior Achievement of New York, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 4/8/2020
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Gavin O'Connor

Goldman Sachs

Term: 2015 - 2019

h.c. Anthony Viscogliosi

Viscogliosi Brothers, LLC

Brian Varga, P.E.

National Grid

Crystal Sampson

Ernst & Young LLP

Kenneth Newman

The Walt Disney Company

Nanette Malebranche

FedEx Express

Victor Malanga

Edelman

Shmuel Bulka

Refinitiv

Joseph Duggan

KPMG LLP

Willie Dennis

K&L Gates LLP

Charles Borrok

Cushman & Wakefield, Inc.

Kevin Barr

Terex Corporation

Pervez Bamji

Pitney Bowes Inc.

Gavin O'Connor

Goldman Sachs

Leslie Godridge

U.S. Bank

Chris Andersen

G.C.Andersen Partners LLC

Gary Kozlowski

Ernst & Young LLP

Michael Barton

Accenture

Scott Karnas

KKR & Co. L.P.

Sey-Hyo Lee

Winston & Strawn LLP

Mona Moazzaz

MetLife

Amy Springsteel

Voya Financial

Scott Lippstreu

Deloitte Consulting

Chuck Imhoff

Delta Air Lines

Brian Inselberg

Starr Companies

Joseph Murphy

U.S. Bank

Keith Pinniger

Citigroup

Craig Soloff

K2View

Lisa Sawicki

PwC LLP

Brendan Walsh

American Express

Toby Singh Baba

Santander Bank

Yvette Baez

Univision Communications

Pervez Bamji

Pitney Bowes

Gregg Bishop

City of New York Department of Small Business Services

Manuel Chinea

Popular Bank

Jim Fosina

Fosina Marketing Group

Michael Finn

Sterling National Bank

Phil Evans

BlackRock

Marie Gallagher

PepsiCo, Inc.

John Gambale

AIG

Kurt Kurimsky

BNY Mellon

Chris Levendos

Crown Castle

Jon Monks

Sompo International

Rosa Ramos-Kwok

Kishore Siva

Wells Fargo & Co

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 04/08/2020

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Keywords

Financial Literacy, Entrepreneurship, Education, College Readiness, Career Readiness, Economic Education, Financial Capability, Business Education, Workforce Readiness