Human Services

GLENEAYRE EQUESTRIAN PROGRAM, INC

We use the powerful connection between horses and people to teach, learn, grow, and heal.

Lumberton, NJ

Mission

We use the powerful connection between horses and people to teach, learn, grow, and heal. We provide a safe haven for our program horses to live with dignity, peace, and veterinary care for the remainder of their lives.

Ruling Year

1988

Founder

Mrs. Ellen J. Healey

Executive Director

Mr. Bill Rube

Main Address

573 Eayrestown Road

Lumberton, NJ 08048 USA

Formerly Known As

Living Bridges, International

Keywords

equine facilitated learning, equine facilitated mental health program, working student program, horsemanship, horses, children developing character skills, psychotherapy, veteran, PTSD

EIN

23-2513468

 Number

6659796742

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Human Service Organizations (P20)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Social Media

Programs + Results

What we aim to solve

The need is a scarcity of resources to meet demand. Gleneayre has been approached by individuals, schools, and community groups seeking our services. We require additional accredited instructors to increase our capacity and efficacy. Adding to our staff would allow us to (1) increase the number of Working Students while maintaining the success of this individualized program, (2) expand the numbers of at-risk youth in our EFL group program, and (3) adapt the curricula of our EFL program to meet the needs of new community partners. The needs of the Working Students have grown in ways reflective of current societal pressures. Our staff is stretched to capacity for providing the Working Students with riding instruction, stable- and horse-care supervision, and school support at the level we are committed to maintain. With additional staff, we will also be able to host more school groups in our EFL program and adapt the curricula for other community youth agencies.

Our programs

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Gleneayre Equestrian Program

Working Student Program

Equine Facilitated Learning

Equine Facilitated Mental Health

Where we work

Charting Impact

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What is the organization aiming to accomplish?

What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?

What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?

How will they know if they are making progress?

What have they accomplished so far and what's next?

Gleneayre’s vision is to serve greater segments of our community and raise awareness of the effectiveness of equine-assisted programs. Programs are structured to provide both preventive and recovery activities for children and adults with social-emotional and behavioral challenges. With the recent recognition that social competence and emotional regulation, not just literacy skills or ability to understand numbers, are strong predictors of success in school and later success in work and independent living, the benefits of animal-assisted therapeutic programs are becoming even more relevant. Horses have proven particularly effective therapeutic partners, and our experiential equine-facilitated programs for at-risk youth are in line with emerging best practices for addressing social and emotional challenges. Gleneayre’s goals are to maintain our level of individual attention to each of our participants while expanding the capacity and range of equine-facilitated learning and mental health opportunities we offer. We aim to assure that our staff includes personnel with the qualifications to allow our students to achieve their horsemanship and riding goals and learn positive character traits, executive decision-making abilities, and study skills necessary to succeed. The wraparound needs of the Working Students have grown in ways reflective of current societal pressures: lower-income parents are working longer hours, schools are challenged to teach children of different learning capabilities, extracurricular programs have been cut. Our staff is stretched to capacity for providing the Working Students with riding instruction, stable- and horse-care supervision, and school support at the level we are committed to maintain. We seek to expand the number and population of youth served in our current group EFL and Working Student programs by meeting the requests for services we are presently understaffed to provide. We aim to adapt our EFL and EFMH programs for a broader range of youth and adults who can benefit from equine-assisted services. With the growing need for more individual attention to our Working Students, we are seeking additional staff with a background in educational techniques that promote learning in at-risk youth. As part of our current program, students make progress reports on their riding and their horses’ well-being, as well as keep journals about their experiences at the stable and beyond. These materials give our team insight into our students’ reading and math skills, academic progress, and family situations. With additional staff, our team can provide more direct support to each of our students.

Our strategic planning focuses on hiring and retaining qualified personnel to enhance the services we offer and to accomplish the outreach that is at the heart of our vision to bring the healing power of horses to as many people as possible. Equine activities offer ways to understand one’s own and others’ emotions and behaviors. The horse-rider connection developed in our programs has proven to help participants reconnect emotionally, socially, and physically with themselves and others through horses. With information from students’ parents, guidance counselors, and IEPs, we are able to direct the natural effects of the bonding between horse and student to open up whole new realms of connection that can be transferred to relationships and situations in all aspects of our students’ life experiences. We aim to continue offering services that employ best practices identified by the equine-assisted learning and therapies field. To maintain our quality program, we need to be staffed with the right number of personnel for the number of participants we serve. With the social changes that affect our participants and the exciting research being carried out in our field, we strive to keep our instructors’ certifications relevant and up-to-date and our herd of horses appropriate to the needs of program. Fundraising plans for our programming focus on generating diversified revenue streams through appeal campaigns, corporate support, major-donor cultivation, horse shows, and special events. We actively cultivate corporate and local business sponsorships and in-kind partnerships. We employ a variety of cost-saving practices such as buying supplies in bulk, using energy cost-saving measures, securing discounted and pro-bono equine professional services, and soliciting donations of horses and equipment. Each fall, our annual Gleneayre Horse Show and Hunter Derby benefits our programs through entry fees, a silent auction, vendor fees, and in-kind donations of products and services. This event serves not only as a major fundraiser but also as a showcase for our students and as a community festival. Riders from other stables participate in the horse show and derby; spectators are invited to see our students demonstrate their riding skills; local artisans are given are opportunity to market their crafts; and a children’s area offers activities for the whole family. We are also pursuing various grant opportunities.

Gleneayre’s equine-facilitated learning programs are taught by our certified instructors are based on an activity-based curriculum created by Strides for Success, a leading organization in the equine-assisted learning and therapies field. Our group programs are created to focus on each participant’s or group’s specific issues, which include PTSD, depression, family strife, personal health challenges, and community violence. The envisioned new and expanded programs have taken on new urgency as our reputation and our expertise has grown, increasing demand from outside and motivation among our staff to adapt our equine-assisted experiential curricula to reach a wider range of individuals and groups. Since 1999, we have seen the success of our program through the achievements of our participants: better attendance and performance in school, good life choices in the turbulent teenage years, residual positive effects on other family members, and growth into empathetic, competent young adults with life skills beyond riding and horsemanship. We have recently been featured in national equestrian publications and have gained corporate sponsorships that have promoted our programs. With our track record of success over 20 years of running our programs, we aim to serve as inspiration for other equestrian organizations to develop similar “work to ride” and equine-facilitated learning programs to serve at-risk youth in other regions. Having set the standard for our type of programs, gaining additional staff and targeting new populations is a priority to maintain our high standards.

We will focus on the outcomes achieved by the participants in our programs. Each student in our program, whether in the Working Student program or the group Equine-Facilitated Learning program, is assessed before and after participation in the program. Our assessment forms are completed by the participants themselves, as well as by their parents and/or staff members from our collaborating agencies. Our staff complete evaluations of EFL participants at the end of each series of group sessions and of Working Students at scheduled intervals throughout the year. The curriculum for all our at-risk youth participants focuses on the forty positive supports and strengths that young people need to succeed (known as the Developmental Assets Framework). Our pre- and post-participation worksheets chart specific skills identified in this framework, such as honesty, integrity, motivation, time management, self-confidence, social interaction, respect for self and others, cultural competency, responsibility, pride in achievement, and ability to set and respect boundaries. Since 1999, we have seen the success of our program through the achievements of our participants: better attendance and performance in school, good life choices in the turbulent teenage years, residual positive effects on other family members, and growth into empathetic, competent young adults with life skills beyond riding and horsemanship.

Throughout 2019, we served approximately 140 unique students: The Working Student program served 12 students; once students enter the program (at age 10 or above), they are supported each year through their 13th year in school. The EFL program hosted a group of 10 students from the Burlington County Sheriff’s department for four 10-week sessions over the course of the year, serving 40 students. Brookfield Academy enrolled 13 students for two 5-week sessions, a total of 26 students. The EFMH program served 20 participants. Community riding lessons and horsemanship workshops hosted 18 individuals and 20 local Girl Scouts. Gleneayre is one of only a handful of equine-assisted facilities in southern New Jersey and the only program in our immediate area. While some of the facilities offer services for at-risk youth among therapeutic riding programs for people with disabilities, Gleneayre alone offers at-risk youth a “work to ride” program that teaches vocational and life skills through chores around the farm in exchange for riding and caring for a horse assigned to each student. Participants can enter the program as young as age 10 and are continually enrolled in the program until their thirteenth year of school. The program includes mentoring and school support. No other equine program offers such a holistic approach to students’ wellbeing and such long-term investment in their academic and vocational success on top of their equestrian achievements. Gleneayre’s equine-facilitated learning programs taught by our certified instructors are based on an activity-based curriculum created by Strides for Success, a leading organization in the equine-assisted learning and therapies field. Our group programs are created to focus on each participant’s or group’s specific issues, which include PTSD, depression, family strife, personal health challenges, and community violence. As an equine-assisted program, we are unique in our choice and management of our horses. Initially, horses are carefully selected for their temperaments and abilities to enter our Working Student riding program. When the horses are no longer suitable for the riding program (often because of age), they move into our unmounted equine-facilitated group programs. All horses that enter our programs have a forever home at Gleneayre. We seek to expand the number and population of youth served in our current group EFL and Working Student programs by meeting the requests for services we are presently understaffed to provide. We aim to adapt our EFL and EFMH programs for a broader range of youth and adults who can benefit from equine-assisted services.

External Reviews

Affiliations & Memberships

Equine Assisted Growth and Learning Association 2005

Photos

Financials

GLENEAYRE EQUESTRIAN PROGRAM, INC

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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FREE: Gain immediate access to the following:

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  • Forms 990 for 2017, 2016 and 2015
  • A Pro report is also available for this organization.

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Board Leadership Practices

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?

No

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?

No

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

No

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?

No

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?

No