Housing, Shelter

Laurel House DBA Hope Harbor

providing a home for teens in crisis, transforming lives, and strengthening families

Updated in partnership with OC Nonprofit Central

aka Hope Harbor

Tustin, CA

Mission

Providing a home for teens in crisis, transforming lives, and strengthening families.

Ruling Year

1985

President

Mr. Jim Palmer Dr

Main Address

One Hope Drive

Tustin, CA 92782 USA

Keywords

youths, teens, girls, shelter, runaways, homeless, at-risk. long-term, Laurel House, laurelhouse, laurel house boys home, group home

EIN

33-0098433

 Number

6198013754

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Temporary Shelter For the Homeless (L41)

Children's and Youth Services (P30)

Counseling Support Groups (F60)

IRS Filing Requirement

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Social Media

Programs + Results

What we aim to solve

There is a pressing need for mental health care and shelter programs for at-risk youth in Orange County. More than 27,199 children and youths are identified as “homeless or living in unstable housing arrangements” in Orange County (2017). Teens are significantly more susceptible to victimization, especially when living in insecure or unhealthy housing situations. The two most common reasons why teens run away or become homeless are 1) physical or sexual abuse at home and 2) drug or alcohol dependency. Often times, drug and alcohol abuse are coping mechanisms for internalized pain, trauma, or undiagnosed mental illness. At Hope Harbor (formerly knowns as Laurel House), teens no longer need to focus their energy on worrying where the next meal will come from or how their basic needs will be met. They can instead focus on academic achievement at school, attaining personal goals, and resolving the deeper-rooted issues that led to their state of crisis.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

1 3 4

Our programs

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Home for at-risk, runaway, or homeless teenage girls

Where we work

Our Results

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one. These quantitative program results are self-reported by the organization, illustrating their committment to transparency, learning, and interest in helping the whole sector learn and grow.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Number of students at or above a 90% attendance rate

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

No target populations selected

Related program

Home for at-risk, runaway, or homeless teenage girls

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context notes

100% of students achieve a 90% or higher school attendance rate.

Charting Impact

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What is the organization aiming to accomplish?

What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?

What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?

How will they know if they are making progress?

What have they accomplished so far and what's next?

The expected outcome of providing both long-term shelter and mental health care is to prevent homelessness for at-risk teens by reunifying them with their families or transitioning them into positive living situations. Our mission is providing a home for teens in crisis, transforming lives, and strengthening families. As a crisis intervention program, our goal is to keep the family unit intact without requiring the involvement of a public agency, such as social services. An average of 90% of the teens successfully transition back home with their families, and 10% are referred to a higher level of care when necessary.

In addition to basic necessities, the teen girls receive: individual and family counseling, mental health care treatment and referrals, academic support, drug and alcohol prevention education, and live-in case management rather than a rotation of staff. The teens also complete daily chores, volunteer, and are given life enrichment opportunities focused on college readiness and independent living skills. Counseling and mental health care are essential to resolving the deeper rooted issues behind why teen girls become homeless, enter a life of substance abuse, or become victims of human trafficking.

Since 1985, Hope Harbor (formerly knowns as Laurel House) has filled a gap in services as the only long-term, preventative care program for at-risk, runaway, and homeless teens. Hope Harbor is also the only program providing live-in case management, rather than a rotation of staff. As the needs of the homeless grew and evolved within the community, Hope Harbor has expanded to create a second home for teenage boys. President and CEO of Orange County Rescue Mission since 1992, Jim volunteers his time as the President/Executive Director. He has served as a local elected official, a County Housing Commissioner, and a Senate Confirmed Presidential Appointee. Through his various roles, Jim has grown to be a leading expert on the issues and needs of the homeless in Orange County, CA.

Our goal is to prevent teen homelessness in Orange County. To accomplish this goal, we provide critically-needed, crisis intervention services that help the teens and their families address the root issues behind their state of crisis or homelessness. All teen residents are monitored and evaluated by the therapist during weekly counseling sessions for existing mental health conditions. Psychological and psychiatric evaluations are provided as needed. Additionally, the house parent/case manager observes the teens’ behaviors on a daily basis and consults with the therapist regarding any special incidents. We celebrate each teen who receives services and is either reunified with their families or is transitioned into a positive living situation.

For more than 33 years, Hope Harbor (formerly knowns as Laurel House) has helped prevent hundreds of teens from becoming homeless in Orange County. Last year, 11 teen girls were kept safe from living on the streets, incarceration, and human trafficking. Laurel House provided 271 individual and family counseling sessions, 1,700+ shelter bed nights, 8,064 home-cooked meals, 240 individual coaching sessions, and 2,220 rides to school, appointments, and activities. In 2018, Laurel House purchased a second home in Tustin, CA, to establish a shelter home for at-risk and homeless teen boys. We anticipate opening the Laurel House Boys Home in summer 2019.

External Reviews

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Financials

Laurel House DBA Hope Harbor

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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FREE: Gain immediate access to the following:

  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2018, 2017 and 2016
  • A Pro report is also available for this organization.

See what's included

Board Leadership Practices

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?

Not Applicable

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?

Not Applicable

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

Not Applicable

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?

Not Applicable

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?

Not Applicable

Organizational Demographics

In order to support nonprofits and gain valuable insight for the sector, GuideStar worked with D5—a five-year initiative to advance diversity, equity, and inclusion in philanthropy—in creating a questionnaire. This section is a voluntary questionnaire that empowers organizations to share information on the demographics of who works in and leads organizations. To protect the identity of individuals, we do not display sexual orientation or disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff. Any values displayed in this section are percentages of the total number of individuals in each category (e.g. 20% of all Board members for X organization are female).

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Gender

Race & Ethnicity

Sexual Orientation

We do not display sexual orientation information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Diversity Strategies

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We track retention of staff, board, and volunteers across demographic categories
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We track income levels of staff, senior staff, and board across demographic categories
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We track the age of staff, senior staff, and board
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We track the diversity of vendors (e.g., consultants, professional service firms)
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We have a diversity committee in place
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We have a diversity manager in place
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We have a diversity plan
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We use other methods to support diversity