PLATINUM2022

The Findlay-Hancock County Community Foundation

Bridging Resources. Granting Opportunity.

Findlay, OH   |  www.community-foundation.com

Mission

The Findlay-Hancock County Community Foundation will improve the quality of life for all in the community.

Ruling year info

1992

President & CEO

Dr. Brian P. Treece

Main address

101 W. Sandusky St. Ste. 207

Findlay, OH 45840 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

FINDLAY-HANCOCK COUTNY COMMUNITY FUND OF THE CLEVELAND FOUNDATION

EIN

34-1713261

NTEE code info

Community Foundations (T31)

Fund Raising and/or Fund Distribution (S12)

Fund Raising and/or Fund Distribution (W12)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2020, 2019 and 2018.
Register now

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The Findlay-Hancock County Community Foundation (TCF) provides financial and non-financial leadership for the betterment of Hancock County. The Foundation helps to assure the high quality of life residents enjoy continues for generations to come. The Foundation addresses the philanthropic and estate planning needs of Hancock County residents, as well as its community leadership needs, four ways: It builds and administers funds that serve as permanent community resources. It assists donors who wish to create permanent funds that will support the community in perpetuity. It assesses community needs, opportunities and challenges; through grants, it supports programs that will address them. It provides leadership to the community on important issues by serving as a convener, catalyst, and collaborator within the community.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

The Family Center

The Family Center is a multi-tenant nonprofit facility owned and operated by the Foundation dedicated to honor the human dignity of those in need of assistance by facilitating collaboration among agencies and increasing awareness of the needs of our neighbors in Hancock County. It is currently home to 13 nonprofit organizations.

Population(s) Served
Adults

The Community Foundation partnered with Vermont’s Orton Family Foundation to bring the Community Heart & Soul process to Hancock County.

Heart & Soul is an approach to community development and planning that increases participation in local decision-making and invites residents to shape the future of their communities based on what matters most to them.

Population(s) Served
Adults

The Community Foundation recognizes that while we are a resource, the nonprofits in our community are the boots-on-the-ground life-changers in our community.

We are dedicated to strengthening and assisting those organizations in any way possible. Schneider Circle is a co-hort style program which provides training, forums, coaching and more.

TCF also offers a regular rotation of national experts who come to our offices to meeting one-on-one with local agencies. They offer coaching in a number of areas, including but not limited to: fundraising, governances, leadership and outreach.

Lastly, TCF administers 300+ charitable funds that grant to nonprofit organizations. Contact our Program Department to start the grant writing process.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Hosted by The Community Foundation, Handbags That Help is a women’s giving circle dedicated to building strong families and increasing philanthropy in Hancock County. HTH funds significant charitable projects and programs in our community.
HTH is committed to providing its members with the skills and knowledge needed to make wise social investments. To this end, HTH organizes educational programs covering a variety of topics related to philanthropy.

HTH educates, inspires, and increases the number of women committed to philanthropy in order to strengthen community and demonstrate the impact that can result from informed, focused grant making.

Population(s) Served
Women and girls

The Community Foundation awarded its first scholarship in 1995. Since then, the program has grown to more than 115 funds, which award approximately $325,000 per year to deserving Hancock County students.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Total number of grants awarded

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Total dollar amount of grants awarded

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Total dollar amount of scholarship awarded

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of new funds established

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Gifts to funds established in current year

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of funds

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of donor advised funds

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of donor advised fund grants

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Total dollar amount of donor advised fund grants

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Total gifts received

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of students who receive scholarship funds and/or tuition assistance

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Scholarships

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The Foundation seeks to be the leading philanthropic institution in Hancock County; provide collaborative community leadership that addresses complex, longstanding community problems; support the self-sufficiency of community non-profits; and maintain a mix of assets and funds that will allow it to endure into the future.

The Foundation employs four strategies to achieve its mission, vision, and long term goals.
1. Support of, and participation in, community problem-solving through collective impact and community stakeholder engagement.
2. Providing on-going access to top local and regional experts in nonprofit management to local community nonprofits. This includes workshops, coaching for board and staff, and support of strategic planning.
3. Donor engagement and education regarding community needs and opportunities,
4. Presenting a comprehensive program of philanthropic tools and strategies to current and prospective donors who wish to give through the Foundation.

The Foundation has full-time staff dedicated to collective impact and stakeholder engagement. Through its grantmaking capacity, more than $65 million has been awarded to local organizations to support collaborative approaches to issues such as addiction, workforce development, early childhood education, and more. Beyond funding, the Foundation owns and operates The Family Center, a multi-tenant nonprofit facility.

The Foundation commits more than $100,000 per year in support of nonprofit organizational strengthening.

The Foundation's development staff has more than 50 years experience in planned giving and stewardship. The staff has strong relationships with local attorneys, accountants, and financial planners from all disciplines. The Foundation sponsors local study groups for individuals wishing to become Chartered Advisors in Philanthropy. One staff members has received the CAP designation.

The Collective Impact process was implemented in Hancock County in 2014 to bring all invested parties together to address the challenges facing our community. The Center for Civic Engagement was created with the help of a TCF grant to serve as a hub to support the coalitions working through the Collective Impact process.

The Family Center is owned by the Foundation and houses more than a dozen nonprofit agencies. The Foundation appoints members of a supporting organization board to oversee its operations. The Family Center sees more than 75,000 visitors per year and addresses some of the most basic needs such as food, clothing and shelter.

In the future, the Foundation hopes to build our Community's Endowment to add flexibility to our assets to enable the Foundation to continue to support these programs and add new to serve more individuals in Hancock County.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Community organizations (nonprofits, local government, collaborative groups) and students via grants and scholarships respectively.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Community meetings/Town halls,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

The Findlay-Hancock County Community Foundation
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

The Findlay-Hancock County Community Foundation

Board of directors
as of 09/30/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Ms. Ginger Jones

Gary Wilson

Professor Emeritus The Ohio State University

Garry Peiffer

Retired, Marathon Petroleum Corporation

Patricia Lucas

University of Findlay

David Thomas

Manager of Hancock County Fairgrounds

Ed Reading

Retired, Cooper Tire & Rubber Company

Richard Kirk

ACI Construction

Don Essex

Director of Human Resources and Performance Excellence at the City of Findlay

Christina Rodriguez

Executive Recruitment Lead at Marathon Petroleum Corporation

Kelly Shroll

President of Blanchard Valley Medical Practices

Beverly Dowling

Accounting Coordination & Recruitment Manager at Marathon Petroleum Corporation

Frank Cosiano

Retired Family Physician

John Livingston

Retired Business & Ethics Professional from Marathon Petroleum Corporation

Frank Cosiano

Retired Family Physician

John Livingston

Retired Business & Ethics Professional from Marathon Petroleum Corporation

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 9/30/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data