PLATINUM2022

Coalition for the Homeless of Houston/Harris County

aka Coalition for the Homeless of Houston/Harris County   |   Houston, TX   |  www.homelesshouston.org

Mission

The Coalition for the Homeless of Houston/Harris County acts as a catalyst, uniting partners and maximizing resources to move people experiencing homelessness into permanent housing with supportive services.

Ruling year info

1988

President/CEO

Mr. Michael Nichols

Main address

2000 Crawford Ste 700

Houston, TX 77002 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

76-0257018

NTEE code info

Homeless Services/Centers (P85)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2022, 2021 and 2020.
Register now

Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The Coalition for the Homeless is uniquely positioned to take a macro view of homelessness in the Houston region and has been incredibly effective at reducing the duplication of services and increasing the effectiveness of homeless programs in the Houston region through its planning and coordination activities. Since the Coalition undertook lead agency responsibilities for The Way Home in 2012, the Houston region has seen a 63% reduction in overall homelessness and more than 35,000 people placed in permanent housing programs with an 90% success rate. Homelessness is a symptom of many other broken systems - criminal justice, mental and physical healthcare, foster care, education, etc. - and is often a last stop for those who have been failed by a lack of support or safety net services. One of our greatest opportunities is to put a spotlight on and bring improvements to those systems.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Project Management

The Coalition for the Homeless serves as the official Lead Agency to the homeless response system in Harris, Fort Bend, and Montgomery counties, Texas, which is known as The Way Home. The Way Home is made up of more than 100 partners from all areas of the community, including homeless service agencies, local governments, public housing authorities, the local Veterans Affairs office, and other nonprofits and community stakeholders. The partners of The Way Home work together to make homelessness rare, brief, and non­recurring in Houston’s region. The Coalition for the Homeless unites partners, secures resources, and drives collaboration to move those experiencing homelessness into permanent housing as quickly as possible.

Population(s) Served

A crucial function of the Coalition is to build capacity — not just for the organization, but for our entire homeless response system. We increase the capacity of the system and individual partners to get people experiencing homelessness off the streets, out of shelters, and into permanent housing. In its Fiscal Year 2022, the Coalition brought $90.3M in public funding for homelessness response to the Houston region and worked with direct service partners to deploy those resources as effectively and efficiently as possible.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people
Homeless people

The Coalition serves as the voice of and for The Way Home and its clients through public education and government relations activities. The Coalition educates key stakeholders including elected officials, members of the media, and the general public about the real causes of —and solutions to — homelessness and builds empathy for people experiencing homelessness in our community. The Coalition engages elected officials and governmental entities to advocate for policies that prevent and end homelessness. This year, the Coalition provided input on multiple state policies, including to the Texas Department of Housing and Community Affairs and to theTexas Health and Human Services Commission.

Population(s) Served

The Coalition is the HMIS lead agency to The Way Home. The Homeless Management InformationSystem (HMIS) is an online database that allows client data sharing between partners of The WayHome, as well as client case coordination and electronic referrals. HMIS also measures and tracks the performance and outcomes of our homeless assistance programs for reporting purposes — and, more importantly, so that we can make data­ informed decisions to meet our clients’ needs. The Way Home does not expand services or adjust programs based on community anecdotes; instead, we make changes based on data, which ensures that all partners remain focused on effectively housing and supporting people experiencing homelessness.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people
Homeless people

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Total number of clients experiencing homelessness

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Homeless people, People with disabilities, People with diseases and illnesses, Age groups, Ethnic and racial groups

Related Program

Project Management

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The 2020 Point-in-Time Homeless Count & Survey found a total of 3,974 individuals experiencing homelessness—2,318 (58.3%) people living sheltered and 1,656 (41.7%) people living unsheltered

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The Coalition believes that we can create and sustain a community where homelessness is rare, brief, and
non-recurring by creating strong public/private partnerships, driving collaboration among stakeholders,
using data to drive our strategies, and educating the public on homelessness and its solutions.

The Coalition for the Homeless leads in the development, advocacy, and coordination of community strategies to prevent and end homelessness. Our vision is that we can create a community where homelessness is rare, brief, and non-recurring. We lead the Houston region toward this goal each day by driving collaboration among stakeholders, creating strong public private partnerships, using data to drive our strategy, and educating the public on homelessness and its solutions.

Since 2011 the Coalition has served as lead agency to The Way Home Continuum of Care (CoC) which is the local homeless response system in Harris, Fort Bend, and Montgomery Counties. In this role, the Coalition can be thought of as the “conductor” of the local homeless response system “orchestra.” Just like an orchestra has musicians and instruments, our community is fortunate to have service providers giving direct assistance to people experiencing homelessness. However, the Coalition leads in three key areas where direct service agencies cannot:

• by aligning stakeholders and community members toward a single vision on solving homelessness,
• by acquiring, aligning, and leveraging public and private resources to implement regional, holistic housing and homelessness service programs, and
• by using data to make sure that our programs meet the local needs and that we are being as effective and efficient as possible with our resources.

The Coalition for the Homeless excels as an agency that has an incredible team of subject matter experts on its
staff who are effective leaders and implementers of proven strategies to solve homelessness in our community.
The Coalition's unique position and ability to take a macro view of homelessness makes it a critical part of the
Houston region's continued success on solving homelessness. The fact that the Coalition for the Homeless is
one step removed from those experiencing a housing crisis affords it the opportunity to lead planning and
implementation of homelessness solutions, engage the public in meaningful conversations and impactful giving
exercises, ensure the sustainability of funding for homeless programs, and continue to build and maintain a
homeless response system that can end homelessness and improve the quality of life for those experiencing a
housing crisis.

Community COVID Housing Program (CCHP):
Due to underlying health conditions and a lack of access to facilities, people experiencing homelessness are moresusceptible to COVID and are at higher risk of experiencing severe symptoms and complications from the disease. On July 1,2020, the City of Houston, Harris County, and Coalition for the Homeless jointly announced an ambitious, $65-million plancalled the Community COVID Housing Program (CCHP) with the goal to serve approximately 5,000 people by September2022 to limit the spread and impact of COVID among those experiencing homelessness. We, along with partners of The Way Home, reached our goal of serving 5,000 people in August 2021 and have begun Phase2 of the CCHP which will extend the program and serve an additional 7,000 people through December 2024. The Coalition is incredibly proud of the unprecedented results that our leadership has achieved on this program to-date. We have served more than 10,000 people as of August 2022 and our outcomes show more than 80% of clients remaining successful in those programs.
Encampment Decommissioning:
Another achievement is the Coalition's leadership, success, and national recognition on decommissioning encampments. The Coalition has always believed that we cannot just move people in encampments down the road; the answer to all unsheltered homelessness, including encampments, is to provide people with permanent housing and supportive services. Thanks to the wealth of housing resources available through the CCHP and the strong partnerships that the Coalition has cultivated with the City of Houston, Harris County, and local management districts, we have been able to decommission 57 encampments since January 2021 with a 90% success rate of those individuals moving into housing. Our leadership on encampments has received national attention. The US Department of Housing and Urban Development(HUD) assigned a technical assistant to study our work on encampments and work jointly with the Coalition to create an encampment decommissioning manual that is being touted as a national best practice on addressing homeless encampments. Our manual has been shared with communities across the nation like Boston, Los Angeles, and Seattle, and we are frequently meeting with other Continuums of Care to offer mentorship and lessons learned as they begin their own work.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We act on the feedback we receive

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time, It is difficult to get honest feedback from the people we serve

Financials

Coalition for the Homeless of Houston/Harris County
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Coalition for the Homeless of Houston/Harris County

Board of directors
as of 11/03/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Troi Taylor

Taylor Construction Management

Cynthia Alvarado

Midtown Management District

Griff Godwin

Greater Houston Builders Association

Andy Icken

City of Houston

Ashley Allen, PhD

Houston Community Land Trust

Devon Anderson

Justice Forward

Tina Arias Peterman

Masterson Advisors

Ric Campo

Camden

Chris Hanslik

BoyarMiller

Teddy Adams

Crown Castle

Doug Foshee

SallyPort Investments

Santhi Periasamy

self-employed

Redick Edwards

Houston Housing Finance Corporation

Alex Triantaphyllis

Harris County Judge's Office

Ken Valach

Trammel Crow Residential

Shannah Stephens

Bank of America

Kris Thomas

retired

Lance Gilliam

Waterman Steele Real Estate Advisors

Chrishelle Palay

HOME Coalition

Annette Garber

HCA Houston Healthcare

Erica Hughes, Esq.

Department of Justice

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 10/14/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 10/14/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.