Progressive Life Center, Inc.

Forging Community for Children and Families

aka PLC   |   Washington, DC   |  https://progressivelifecenter.org

Mission

Progressive Life Center continues to transform the lives of children, youth and families with its unique approach that embraces each individual’s psychological, spiritual, and cultural needs. With a focus on child welfare, behavioral health and juvenile justice, PLC connects people to their communities to ensure long-term success.

Ruling year info

1984

President and CEO

Diana Banks

Main address

1704 17th St Ne

Washington, DC 20002 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

52-1326357

NTEE code info

Other Mental Health, Crisis Intervention N.E.C. (F99)

Foster Care (P32)

Family Services (P40)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

A primary focus of PLC's programming is supporting the needs of children and families engaged with our regions’ child welfare agencies, and specifically those in the foster care system. According to Child Trends, the number of children in foster care has increased in recent years, climbing to 443,000 in 2017 from a recent historic low of 397,000 in 2012. The National Conference on State Legislatures (NCSL) reports that youth in the system have higher rates of school transfer, school absence or tardiness, and suspension and expulsion. NCSL reports they are more likely to perform below grade level and less likely to receive a high school diploma. The National Foster Youth Institute (NFYI) reports that 20% of youth in foster care will become instantly homeless upon aging out. NFYI found there is less than a 3% chance they will succeed in higher education, and that only 50% will have employment at age 24. NFYI also states that as many as 25% who have aged out are affected by PTSD.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

DC YouthLink

PLC serves as the Administrative Partner for the District of Columbia Department of Youth Rehabilitative Services’ Community Programing Initiative. In this role, PLC coordinates a continuum of community-based service providers who support court-involved youth and their families.
PLC’s “care coordination pathway” streamlines each youth’s treatment from beginning to end and includes the youth, his/her primary care-givers, natural supports (e.g. local pastor, teacher) and others, such as social workers and case managers. This practice allows PLC to establish a rapport with youth being served and develop long-lasting relationships with those who are providing services to the youth and family. Through these efforts, PLC ensures that court-involved youth and their families achieve personal goals and milestones through participation in a wide range of programs that emphasize individual strengths, personal accountability, public safety, skill development, family involvement and community support.

Population(s) Served
At-risk youth

Since 2013, PLC has provided afterschool services to youth in the community. Our program is offered Monday through Friday afterschool and during the day on Saturday, empowering and enriching the lives of adolescents between the ages of 12 to 17 years, free of charge.

In addition to academic and cultural enrichment, The Adolescent Clubhouse provides a therapeutic approach that focuses on harm reduction and reducing high-risk behaviors such as alcohol and drug use and unsafe sex. Services are provided in group settings, based on age and gender, to ensure that activities are developmentally and gender appropriate. We incorporate NTU, an Afrocentric, culturally-centered and spiritually-based psychotherapeutic treatment model developed by PLC, which increases our success rate for treatment and healing.

Population(s) Served
At-risk youth
Adolescents

Since 1990, PLC has provided traditional and therapeutic foster care for children in underserved communities in Washington, DC; Baltimore, MD; Landover, MD; Philadelphia, PA; and Newark, DE. Our primary emphasis is on the well-being of each child in our care, with the ultimate goal of permanent placement.

The children and youth we serve often come to us with significant behavioral, emotional and development issues compounded by the consequences of systemic neglect and abuse. Others have a medical diagnosis that requires close or ongoing supervision. While each needs special care, they deserve a loving, nurturing home environment in order to thrive and grow into healthy, productive adults.

To ensure that the children we serve have a secure and loving home to heal, grow and thrive, PLC recruits and rigorously screens and trains foster parents. Each member of the foster family is extensively screened and must complete a comprehensive training program. After successful completion, we assign a multi-disciplinary treatment team to the foster family.

Teamwork and community collaboration are integral to our specialized foster care model. Each foster care home receives 24-hour support from their assigned team of trained professionals. By emphasizing the child and the treatment parents, PLC successfully enhances the cultural identity, spiritual, emotional and social functioning of the children we serve. Importantly, our Foster Care Program facilitates stability and permanency – and allows the children to thrive.

Our Foster Care Services
Biological Family and Community
Partnerships
Clinical Support
Crisis Intervention
Individualized Residential Treatment
In-home Family Therapy
Parenting-skills Training
Psychiatric Counseling
Respite Care
Spiritually and Culturally Focused Counseling
Foster Parents in Prince George’s Maryland
Are at least 21 years of age
Can be single, married, divorced or widowed
Both men and women can become foster/adoptive parents
Able to obtain medical clearance from a health provider
Must be able to meet your family’s current financial obligations
Your home must pass a health and fire inspection
Police clearance and fingerprinting is required for everyone 18 years & older who reside in your home
You need to be willing to work in the best interest of the child

Population(s) Served
Families
Children and youth

PLC is distinguished as the only private-care organization that provides Kinship Care services in Prince George’s County, MD. We provide case management and supportive services to families residing in the county who care for a relative’s child or children. Our Kinship Care program is a home visiting program specifically designed to provide these selfless caregivers with needed emotional support, guidance, counseling and financial assistance.

By providing weekly home visits, resources, referrals, family advocacy, crisis intervention, recreational and cultural activities, and parenting classes, we increase the likelihood that children will remain in the care of loving relatives – and prevent the necessity for placement in foster care.

Families can participate in the Kinship Care Program for up to two months. Families who have participated in the Kinship Care Program are better equipped to continue raising children in their care if the biological parents are unwilling or unable to do so due to substance abuse, domestic violence, incarceration, unemployment, illness or other major crises.

A follow-up is conducted every six months and 1-year after closure to ensure permanency. Families are eligible and welcome to attend Triple P Parenting and/or Mental Health First Aid training during and/or after the service delivery period.

Who is Eligible?
You live in Prince George’s County, MD
Provide care for children related to you
The children are 18 years or younger
Children must live with you in your home

Population(s) Served
Families
Children and youth

Where we work

Accreditations

Council on Accreditation (COA) 2020

Affiliations & memberships

Council on Accreditation (COA) 2020

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of youth who have a positive adult role model

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Young adults, Children and youth, At-risk youth, Family relationships, Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of children placed in foster homes

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, At-risk youth, Economically disadvantaged people, Family relationships, Ethnic and racial groups

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

It is Progressive Life Center’s goal to reach more children, youth and families and help make connections to community and family supports that provide opportunities to live happy and fulfilling lives. We seek to ensure that the children we serve have a secure and loving home to heal, grow and thrive, often in a temporary placement, but with the goal of family reunification or another permanent home.

Through our intensive, in-home intervention model, when appropriate, we seek to avert at-risk children being placed in foster care by providing families in crisis with therapeutic services that protect the children while supporting, strengthening and stabilizing the family.

Through after-school and summer programming for foster youth and other youth at-risk, we seek to offer academic, cultural and career enrichment with a therapeutic approach that focuses on harm reduction, reducing high-risk behaviors and promoting pro-social behavior and general mental, spiritual and physical health.

For more than three decades, PLC has delivered positive outcomes for children and youth who are the most vulnerable: those in the child welfare and juvenile justice systems, and others facing economic insecurity, housing instability, and mental health/behavioral challenges. PLC weaves its clinical and administrative capacities to offer outstanding and proven services and strategies in the communities we serve.

Through our foster care programming, PLC recruits and rigorously screens and trains foster parents to ensure a safe and loving home. Each member of the foster family is extensively screened and must complete a comprehensive training program. After successful completion, we assign a multi-disciplinary treatment team to the foster family. Teamwork and community collaboration are integral to our specialized foster care model.

Building on our success in foster care programming, and in providing auxiliary supports to foster youth through programs like ICAN, the Adolescent Clubhouse and the Illumination Project, initially planned to open in 2020 but placed on hold due to COVID-related issues, PLC will soon launch the Prince George’s County Educational and Cultural Enrichment Center to augment children’s public education and expand high-quality learning experiences to improve academic, personal and social skills. After school and summer programming will focus on academic, career and cultural enrichment, and will provide youth with individual and group counseling to address the unique needs of foster and at-risk youth.

As mentioned, PLC’s clinical and administrative infrastructure serve as a vehicle for ongoing success and for growth. For instance, since the early 2000s, PLC has earned renewing contracts to serve as the Administrative Partner for the District of Columbia’s Department of Youth Rehabilitative Services’ Community Programming Initiative. In this role, PLC coordinates a continuum of community-based service providers who support court-involved youth and their families. This serves as one of many examples of PLC’s experience and understanding of human services systems and infrastructure that secures our position for continued success and expansion in any of the seven regions we serve.

PLC’s maintains strong and invested board of directors and senior leadership team with proven and extensive expertise in nonprofit oversight and growth. Each of the seven PLC locations provides administrative support, but under the umbrella of PLC’s Headquarters’ Team that boast a capable finance, human resources and administrative staff of 15, ensuring the health and growth potential of the organization.

Through the provision of effective and well-managed programs, PLC has earned the respect of the various human services agencies with which it has garnered program grants and contracts. Over the years, PLC has consistently earned extended and re-awarded grants and contracts from our county and state partners.

Since our founding in 1983, through our pre-adjudication programming, PLC has helped divert hundreds of youth from the juvenile justice system by providing in-home family therapy in both the District of Columbia and in Maryland. In the mid-1980s, PLC improved individual and community health through a contract with the DC office of Aids Administration to provide counseling to HIV-positive African Americans. Over the years, PLC has certified hundreds of foster parents in DC, Maryland, Pennsylvania and Delaware, helping to provide safe, loving and nurturing homes for thousands of children and adolescents. Family preservation in our Maryland territories has helped keep children in place by providing families with comprehensive services including counseling and community connections. In the District, Maryland and in Delaware, PLC has supported youth in and aging out of foster care, and other at-risk youth to achieve greater independence through counseling and life skills training. In Maryland, PLC has provides youth with substance abuse prevention programming. Much of the aforementioned good work continues throughout the District, and in Maryland, Pennsylvania and Delaware. And there is much more ahead for PLC.
Of significant note in the Prince George's County Education and Cultural Enrichment Center (The Center). The Center will augment children’s public education and expand high-quality learning experiences to improve academic, personal and social skills. Importantly, The Center will address any special education needs to confirm both the identification and the appropriate instruction and support required for these children. Center programs will focus on enhancing analytical thinking and academic skills with an emphasis on reading and STEM. In addition, students will be exposed to a range of career options through guest speakers, workplace site visits and Career Days. Students will also participate in field trips designed to ignite their curiosity and imagination and align their thinking towards seeing themselves as worthy, confident and contributing members of our community.

Educators widely recognize the middle grade years as a critical period of adolescent development. According to the U.S. Department of Education, high-quality middle grade schooling is essential for getting young people ready for high school, college, and careers. In high-poverty schools in particular, the middle grades can “either put students on a path to college and careers—or it can steer them to dropping out and the unemployment line.” The DOE emphasizes that early intervention is easier and more cost-effective than waiting until high school. For this reason, PLC’s Center will initially target students in grades 6-9 and will expand to serve the K-12 continuum over time.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Youth and families

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Frustrated with their children’s unrealistic career expectations (e.g., pro athlete or social media star), caregivers of the Baltimore City youth served at our “Meet Me Halfway” Adolescent Clubhouse asked for more activities that expose their teens to realistic career & vocational opportunities. In response, we now offer a weekly enrichment activity - fieldtrips to workplaces, universities & vocational schools, & opportunities to interact with staff, students & instructors. We empower youth by offering resume writing workshops & helping youth find summer jobs. For the Clubhouse & across PLC programming, we responded to caregiver & youth’s desire for hybrid virtual/in-person programming, providing additional opportunities to connect without compromising important face-to-face exchanges.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board, Our funders,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Our 20+ year accreditation from the Council on Accreditation (COA) recognizes PLC’s commitment to client surveys that drive programmatic change. Our service delivery model is one that celebrates individual and family strengths, and fosters the empowerment of those we serve. Satisfaction surveys play an important role in the empowerment process. Clients have expressed appreciation to being heard, and gratitude for our genuine interest in understanding and accommodating their needs. These exchanges raise expectations of client caregivers, youth and children, to believe their feedback is important and can inform and guide change.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback,

Financials

Progressive Life Center, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Progressive Life Center, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 4/12/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Dr. James Ray

Ray’s Consultant Group, LLC

Adam Ostrach

Capital One

Michael Graff

McGuireWoods

Rebecca McCabe

Freddie Mac

Malcolm Jackson

Deloitte Consulting LLP

Pamela Lucas

The PAMCO Group

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Not applicable

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 04/12/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American/African
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 04/14/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.