Human Services

GEORGIA COALITION AGAINST DOMESTIC VIOLENCE, INC.

We begins with me.

DECATUR, GA

Mission

GCADV envisions a Georgia free of domestic violence. We empower survivors and the programs that serve them, we educate the public and we advocate for responsive public policy. Our strength is in numbers as we collaborate throughout Georgia to stop domestic violence.

Ruling Year

1993

Executive Director

Ms. Jan Christiansen

Main Address

114 NEW STREET Suite B

DECATUR, GA 30030 USA

Keywords

Domestic violence, coalition, victim services, capacity building, training, technical assistance, advocacy, public policy, organizing, outreach

EIN

58-1854962

 Number

5014862892

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (P01)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Social Media

Programs + Results

What we aim to solve

GCADV works to address domestic violence in Georgia. Domestic violence (DV) is a widespread problem that affects tens of thousands of Georgians annually, with 52,282 crisis calls made to state-certified DV programs between October 2018 and September 2019. As of 2018, Georgia ranked 25th in the nation for the rate at which women are killed by men. More than 850 Georgians were killed by a firearm in DV-related incidents between 2010 and 2018. GCADV works to end domestic violence and strengthen the service provider and criminal justice response in order to ensure justice and healing. In recognition of the disproportionate impacts on survivors from marginalized identities, GCADV takes a social justice approach to promote equity for survivors who are racial, ethnic, religious minorities, LGBTQ, who have a disability, who are immigrants/refugees, and others.

Our programs

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Training

Technical Assistance

Public Policy and Advocacy

Statewide Outreach

24-Hour Statewide Hotline

Child & Youth Project

Justice for Incarcerated Survivors Project

Economic Justice Project

Community Engagement Project

BRIDGES

Where we work

Our Results

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one. These quantitative program results are self-reported by the organization, illustrating their committment to transparency, learning, and interest in helping the whole sector learn and grow.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Number of crisis hotline calls answered

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

No target populations selected

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of community events or trainings held and attendance

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

No target populations selected

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of hours of training

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

No target populations selected

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Charting Impact

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What is the organization aiming to accomplish?

What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?

What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?

How will they know if they are making progress?

What have they accomplished so far and what's next?

The Georgia Coalition Against Domestic Violence (GCADV) is the state’s federally recognized coalition for domestic violence agencies, advocates, allied individuals and survivors. GCADV’s mission is to collaborate, advocate, educate, and empower. We envision a Georgia that is free of domestic violence. GCADV empowers survivors and the programs that serve them, educates the public, and advocates for responsive public policy. State and territorial domestic violence coalitions are non-governmental, non-profit, membership organizations that work with their members and allies to: ● Promote quality services for victims that focus on safety and self-determination; ● Advocate and educate on behalf of survivors, their children, and their advocates; ● Facilitate partnerships among victim advocates, allied organizations, and state agencies, mobilizing a statewide voice on domestic violence; ● Connect local, state and national work; and ● Engage in the prevention and social change efforts that challenge the social, economic and political conditions that sustain a culture of violence in which domestic and sexual violence is condoned. Coalitions involve at least the majority of domestic violence service providers in the state, as well as advocates for Native American/Indigenous survivors and for those marginalized on the basis of race, color, religion, ethnicity, national origin, ancestry, citizenship, gender/gender identity, sexual orientation, physical/cognitive ability, age, marital status, class, or legal status. GCADV is proud to embrace this role for Georgia and to provide leadership on a statewide basis. GCADV’s current strategic plan goals are: 1. Historically marginalized and oppressed communities are elevated, self-directing and liberated. 2. The impact of domestic violence is mitigated through trauma healing and authentic relationships. 3. Diverse funding is catalyzed. 4. Survivors have access to services in their communities. 5. GCADV is recognized as the central, expert voice for the movement in Georgia.

1. Elevate the voices of historically marginalized and oppressed individuals and communities. 2. Engage and support groups offering services to survivors or domestic violence including member programs and other community-based groups. 3. Create a common language about domestic violence and its impact in Georgia. 4. Catalyze funding 5. Cultivate unity through authentic, generative relationships will all concerned. Work with and not for.

As the state’s federally-recognized domestic violence coalition, GCADV is uniquely able to address the issue of domestic violence. GCADV is governed by a 16-member board of directors and led by a highly qualified staff of twelve passionate advocates. Twelve of our board members represent our network of approximately 50 member organizations. GCADV’s budget consists of nearly $1.8 million and is effective at managing federal and state funds. We undergo an annual audit by an independent accounting firm and have the policies and procedures in place to ensure proper administration of funds. We are also guided by a board-approved strategic plan. GCADV leverages resources and partnerships across the state to ensure that the holistic needs of victims and their families are met. GCADV is a member of several statewide coalitions and collaborations to enhance and coordinate services for domestic violence and underserved/minority immigrant victims. GCADV serves on the Georgia’s S.T.O.P. VAWA Implementation Plan Committee, and its staff lead several sub-committees. GCADV also serves on the Georgia Immigrant and Refugee Rights Coalition, United 4 Safety Task Force, Fatality Reduction Initiative, Georgia Latinos Against Domestic Violence Task Force, Georgia Domestic Violence Media Watch, Fatality Review Implementation Committee, and the Emory Center for Injury Control. GCADV also works closely with national and regional groups such as the National Network to End Domestic Violence, Women of Color Network, Resonance Network, and many others. These partnerships enable GCADV to effectively serve survivors and incorporate intersectionality as a key partner in a global movement to end violence and oppression. Participation in these groups expands our capacity to serve Georgia’s 159 counties through coordinating efforts with other agencies, and enhances our capacity to serve underserved victim populations.

GCADV evaluates success using bi-annual member surveys, communication engagement metrics, and pre- and post-training evaluations. GCADV prepares monthly activity reports for all social media platforms. We perform annual communications surveys via all social media platforms, newsletter, membership meetings, and board meetings. GCADV shares feedback with the Board and uses assessment results to improve activities. Our strategic plan includes a strategy screen, a list of determinants used to guide strategic decision making. Organizational members may deny all or some of the strategic questions and still choose to move forward with a decision. The importance of the strategy screen is that it helps GCADV’s leadership make informed decisions. Members of the Board and Staff of GCADV listed the following determinants to be used when considering making a strategic decision. 1. Is this mission-aligned? 2. Do the resources exist or can we get the resources to do this? 3. Will this build power and agency in communities? 4. What is the impact on survivors? 5. What is the impact on member programs? 6. What is the impact on historically marginalized communities? 7. Are we the right group to do this? Could someone else do it better? 8. Does it align with our values? 9. Does it further our position in Georgia? 10. What evidence is there that this is a true solution? 11. What are the risks? GCADV’s staff and board review the plan annually, making adjustments as needed.

GCADV’s work has focused on expanding awareness and broadening our impact, while intentionally striving to live into the values of equity, wholeness, and freedom. GCADV was instrumental in securing and administering state funds for the inaugural cohort of Georgia’s domestic violence shelters in 1982 which was a catalyst to mobilize local grassroots DV advocates and leaders. Over the past 30 years, GCADV has successfully advocated to protect and include unmarried people in Georgia’s Domestic Violence Act, achieve child support for victims as a part of a Temporary Protective Order, successfully fought against the elimination of the Georgia Commission on Family Violence, and advocated for a $200,000 funding increase for Georgia’s certified domestic violence shelters. Among these policy victories, GCADV has also hosted countless trainings statewide that focused on safety and survival for survivors and technical assistance centered on trauma, safety, and healing for survivors and communities. GCADV is also engaged in a variety of statewide collaborative projects designed to 1) support the unique needs of underserved victim populations; 2) analyze and address trends and service barriers; 3) assist victims with self-sufficiency goals, and 4) provide coordinated access to shelters throughout the state. Programs such as the Community Engagement Project continue to support community-based programs and learn from historically oppressed and marginalized communities how to better support survivors from those communities. The Child and Youth Project support those who work with young people exposed to domestic violence including child advocates and mental health therapists. Our Disabilities Project continues to work with member pilot sites to build their capacity to serve Deaf and Hard of Hearing survivors. And, the Fatality Review Project, in its 15th year, focused on the connection between domestic violence fatalities and stalking. As a result of GCADV’s efforts, we are able to promote greater understanding of DV and its impacts, more survivor-centered policies, greater offender accountability, and a stronger network of advocates and service providers.

External Reviews

External Assessments

Evaluated via the Impact Genome Project (2018)

Photos

Financials

GEORGIA COALITION AGAINST DOMESTIC VIOLENCE, INC.

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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FREE: Gain immediate access to the following:

  • Address, phone, website and contact information
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  • A Pro report is also available for this organization.

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Board Leadership Practices

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?

Yes

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?

Yes

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

Yes

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?

Yes

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?

Yes

Organizational Demographics

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? This organization has voluntarily shared information to answer this important question and to support sector-wide learning. GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 02/05/2020

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & Ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender Identity
Female, Not Transgender (Cisgender)
Sexual Orientation
Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, or other sexual orientations in the LGBTQIA+ community
Disability Status
Person with a disability

Race & Ethnicity

Gender Identity

Sexual Orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity Strategies

Last updated: 02/05/2020

Policies and practices developed in partnership with Equity in the Center, a project that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems within the social sector to increase racial equity. Learn more

Data

done
We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
done
We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
done
We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
done
We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
done
We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
done
We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
done
We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.

Policies and processes

done
We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
done
We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
done
We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
done
We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
done
We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
done
We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.