Human Services

Kristi House, Inc.

Heal and Eradicate Child Abuse and Sex Trafficking

Miami, FL   |  www.kristihouse.org

Mission

Kristi House is dedicated to eradicating child abuse and child sex trafficking – working nationally on solutions, and locally to heal child-victims. Operating the nationally accredited, State-designated Child Advocacy Center (CAC) for Miami-Dade County, Kristi House is responsible for coordinating the seven community partners involved in the investigation, prosecution and treatment of child abuse cases. Kristi House assists child-victims and their families in navigating the complex services involved in the healing process. We are nationally recognized for our evidence-based, therapeutic expertise in treating child sexual abuse and other forms of child trauma. All services are provided at no charge to victims and families.

Notes from the nonprofit

Kristi House is proud to be serving the South Florida community for 25 years, working with a dedicated multi-disciplinary team of agency-partners all focused on healing children who have been abused and holding their perpetrators responsible.

Ruling year info

1995

Executive Director

Amanda G. Altman

Main address

1265 NW 12th Ave

Miami, FL 33136 USA

Show more addresses

EIN

65-0576650

Cause area (NTEE code) info

Children's and Youth Services (P30)

Victims' Services (P62)

Emergency Assistance (Food, Clothing, Cash) (P60)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Kristi House aims to heal and eradicate child abuse and child sex trafficking.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Family Advocacy

Because the legal system can be difficult to negotiate, and gaining access to supportive agencies and therapy can also be complicated, Kristi House Family Advocates work directly with families to facilitate these processes. They determine the needs of children and families, make referrals for needed services, assist families in accessing those services, and assist in the coordination of services with agencies in the Center, and community, to help reduce system trauma. Kristi House provides a vital support system to victims encouraging them to pursue all avenues of treatment and all legal means to stop the abuse and ensure long-term recovery. Family Advocates provide an avenue for families to work with law enforcement agencies and/or the State Attorney's Office when a criminal investigation process is necessary. They also educate the families about the investigative and prosecutorial process and connect children and families to appropriate service providers in the community.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth (0-19 years)
Victims and oppressed people

Therapy is a critical component in helping children overcome the trauma of child sexual abuse. While child sexual abuse has been Kristi House’s specialty since founding, its mental health unit has the proven treatment interventions for many types of childhood trauma including: child sex trafficking, problematic sexual behavior, physical abuse, and substance abuse. Kristi House is one of a very few agencies in Miami-Dade County providing specialized mental health services for child abuse regardless of families' ability to pay. Because untreated child sexual abuse often manifests itself in health, sexual and social problems throughout life, it is vitally important that Kristi House provides abused children with mental health services. Dedicated to protocols with proven results, Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT) provides the foundation for most interventions at Kristi House. Types of therapy provided include play therapy, individual therapy, group therapy, and family therapy. During intake or at any point throughout the course of treatment, a therapist may refer a child victim for an evaluation to the in-house Doctor of Psychiatry.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth (0-19 years)

With national studies finding 1 in 4 girls and 1 in 6 boys will be sexually abused by the age of 18, Kristi House remains dedicated to child sexual abuse prevention training and education in its mission focused exclusively on child sexual abuse. We deliver best practice programs for schools, community groups, corporations and faith-based organizations, with different curricula specifically geared for children, parents and providers. In addition, since 2007 Kristi House has grown its practice and training to address a previously overlooked form of child sexual abuse, the commercial sexual exploitation of children. Kristi House offers programs for children, parents/caregivers and the service provider community. Since founding 23 years ago, Kristi House has provided classes, training and education programs to more than 112,000 participants.

Population(s) Served
General/Unspecified

To work with children at the Center, special events and fund raising.

Population(s) Served
Adults
General/Unspecified

For children in the dependency system with allegations of sexual abuse, Kristi House provides comprehensive level of care assessments and mental health evaluations for the courts to help determine a child's best placement.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth (0-19 years)
Victims and oppressed people

Where we work

Accreditations

Council on Accreditation (COA) 2004

National Children's Alliance - Accreditation 2002

Awards

3-Year Grant to expand Project GOLD to include strong mentoring component and expand services for boys and LGBTQI 2014

U.S Department of Justice - Office of Juvenile Justice & Delinquency Prevention

National Children's Alliance Grants for Program Improvement and Expansion 2014

National Children's Alliance

Create Miami C-START, project to enhance trauma-Informed services and provide training for provider community in evidence-based treatment for child sexual-related trauma 2012

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Center for Substance Abuse Prevention.

4-Year Grant for Commercially Sexually Exploited Girls 2011

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

Urban Initiative Grant 2011

National Children's Alliance

Grant for Addressing the Commercial Sexual Exploitation of Children 2009

US Department of Justice

Bud Cramer Award - Nelson Diaz - Safe Harbor advocacy work 2014

National Children's Alliance

Women Who Make a Difference Award - Project GOLD 2013

Junior League of Miami

Justice for All Award - Outstanding Contributions to Victims of Crime 2014

Office of the Attorney General

Advocate of the Year - Trudy Novicki - for Child Sex Trafficking 2012

Florida Children and Youth Cabinet in Tallahassee

Chosen Evaluation Fellow for Retooling Professionals 2010

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

Women Who Make a Difference - Trudy Novicki 2009

Junior League of Miami

"Best of Miami" Civic Leader 2008

MIAMI TODAY Newspaper

Reflections in Excellence Award 2007

MIAMI TODAY Newspaper

NOVO Award for Non-Profit Innovation 2007

Greater Miami Chamber of Commerce

Sapphire Award - Outstanding Health Services to Undeserved Communities 2006

The Blue Foundation

Violence Prevention and Treatment Social Services Award 2007

The Melissa Institute

Office for Victims of Crime for Project GOLD "Bridges to the Future" Job Training and Education 2018

U.S. Dept. of Justice

Affiliations & memberships

National Child Traumatic Stress Network 2012

National Children's Alliance - Full Member 2000

Council of Accreditation of Child and Family Services, Inc. 2004

Number of children served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth (0-19 years),At-risk youth

Related Program

Family Advocacy

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The total of 1,770 represents child-victims of abuse served and does not include their family members.

Number of people trained

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

General/Unspecified,Adults,At-risk youth

Related Program

Education and Outreach

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Charting impact

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

What is the organization aiming to accomplish?

EXPANSION/ENHANCEMENT OF SERVICES: Kristi House will continue to expand and enhance services in the Miami-Dade community to all child victims of sexual abuse, including those victims of sexual exploitation, through direct service and the Multidisciplinary Team. EDUCATION AND OUTREACH: Kristi House will increase education and outreach to the Miami-Dade community to improve outcomes for all children and increase the visibility of the organization. STAFF EXPERTISE: Kristi House staff will continue to be experts in the field of child sexual abuse through the development and marketing of that expertise. FINANCIAL STABILITY: Kristi House Board and staff will ensure the financial sustainability of our mission. ENDOWMENT: Kristi House Board and Staff will kick off an endowment fundraising campaign in 2018-19. PARTNERSHIPS AND COLLABORATIONS: Kristi House Board and Staff will continue our commitment to partnerships and collaboration surrounding child sexual abuse and exploitation.

EXPANSION/ENHANCEMENT OF SERVICES: This strategic priority calls for enhancing services specifically for sexual exploitation, which involves adding transportation, critical for client engagement; partnering with University of Miami to research mental health interventions for CSEC; and expanding programming and services offered to Project GOLD clients. Another specific strategy under this area calls for increasing services for Kristi House case coordination and therapy to better reach children in Homestead and Florida City. EDUCATION AND OUTREACH: Strategies in this area take a multipronged approach to providing prevention programming in schools, particularly those at greatest risk, developing new child trauma trainings in partnership with FIU, obtaining CEUs for training participants, whenever possible, and continuing to target adults and others responsible for keeping children safe. STAFF EXPERTISE: Strategies in this area include continuing to provide education and training programs in a variety of venues on the topics of CSEC, children and traumatic stress, sexual abuse awareness, and children with problematic sexual behavior. Service providers, educators, workers in child-serving organizations and parents are targeted. FINANCIAL STABILITY: Strategies in this area are multipronged, involving increasing private/personal giving, restoring State funding we had for 15 years, and ensuring maximum earnings through Medicaid reimbursement. It also calls for careful analysis of all fundraising efforts to ensure appropriate cost to earnings ratios are maintained, and increased fundraising on the part of Board members. An endowment fund is needed; its anticipated launch is 2018. PARTNERSHIPS AND COLLABORATIONS: This area seeks to expand and enhance our community partnerships through our work at the CSEC Drop In Center, through our SAMHSA training grant in partnership with child welfare, through presentations at major conferences, increased board participation and PR outreach.

Kristi House's strength lies in its people. STAFF: Kristi House has a staff of 49 employees. They are led by a senior staff management team of five professionals: the CEO, CFO, COO, Programs Director and Director of Development. Staff is comprised of experienced, qualified clinicians, case managers and administrators who reflect Miami's diverse community. The front-line program staff are multilingual in five languages and many are first-generation immigrants to the U.S. from Central and South America and Caribbean countries including Cuba, Haiti, Jamaica, Guatemala, Nicaragua, Colombia, Honduras, Puerto Rico, Peru, Bolivia, and Italy. They reflect the cultural diversity of Miami-Dade County, unmatched anywhere in the United States. BOARD: A volunteer board of 25 community leaders, social services specialists and doctors set policy for the organization, raise funds and plan for the future. Board members meet at eight regular meetings annually, and in committees on a monthly or quarterly basis. The Board is active and committed to fulfilling its governance responsibilities, as reflected in successful re-accreditations, program audits and state and federal funding awards. MANAGEMENT: Kristi House finances are independently audited with no corrective actions in the past 15 years. Kristi House is an accredited member of National Children's Alliance. Kristi House is also accredited by COA, renewed in June 2016, “expedited through the Pre-Commission Review Report (PCR) process as a result of not receiving any out-of-compliance ratings in any of the fundamental practice standards." Kristi House's stakeholder survey scores outpaced the field of COA-accredited not-for-profits in 82% of the measures.

Kristi House closely monitors client outcomes to ensure that its services are meeting child-victims' needs, and that they are indeed significantly improving as a result of services at Kristi House. Kristi House tracks the following outputs for its mental health programs:<br/><br/>• the number of organizations collaborating and sharing resources<br/>• the number of people trained in the EBPs<br/>• level of consumer involvement<br/>• people receiving prevention training<br/>• children screened for interventions<br/>• children receiving the interventions<br/>• children successfully completing treatment <br/><br/>In addition, client outcomes are measured using standardized assessment tools for each intervention. Kristi House's SAMHSA project is being analyzed by an evaluation team led by University of Miami's Dunspaugh-Dalton Community & Educational Well-Being Research Center. Results from the first cohort showed significant improvement in symptoms across a variety of assessment scales in clients who completed treatment. Improvements were seen in PTSD symptoms, anxiety, depression, anger, dissociation and sexual concern subscales. <br/><br/>For CSEC clients, we are tracking girls' level of engagement with programming, case management and therapy. We have set monthly benchmarks for “Active Members," defined as those engaging in 16 or more services per month, and “Emerging Members" receiving 5 to 15 services per month. <br/><br/>We are also measuring participants' readiness to exit the life of exploitation. We are looking at how many girls who are members of the Project GOLD Drop In Center for at least 6 months move forward at least one step on the URICA scale. And we are measuring the number of participants who report no longer being involved in exploitation.<br/><br/>The University of Rhode Island Change Assessment scale (URICA) is used to assess client change. It is a 32-item self-report measure that includes four subscales measuring the stages of change: pre-contemplation, contemplation, action and maintenance. Participants also complete a Client Satisfaction Survey, which enables us to gain information about which services clients find most satisfactory as well feedback about each service obtained. For Project GOLD clients engaged in individual therapy, the Child PTSD Symptom Scale (CPSS) is given to assess trauma symptoms, yielding both a total symptom severity score and a severity of impairment score, as well as the Trauma Symptom Checklist for Children. The Youth Self Report (YSR) is also administered to clients to screen for behavioral and emotional problems. <br/><br/>For those Project GOLD clients who engage in therapy, the therapist uses standardized assessment tools to monitor client progress as well achievement of each individual's treatment plan goals.

We have helped 18,750 children overcome the trauma of sexual abuse so that it does not forever define their lives. We have provided education, prevention and training courses and classes to more than 120,000 participants. We are seeking dedicated and sustained funding to ensure that Kristi House continues to provide this high level of care, services and healing at no cost to families so that cost is never a barrier to a child getting the help they need. We have yet to accomplish this, but have it in our sights.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is the organization collecting feedback?

    We regularly collect feedback through: electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), paper surveys, focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), case management notes, constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees, suggestion box/email.

  • How is the organization using feedback?

    We use feedback to: to identify and remedy poor client service experiences, to identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, to make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, to inform the development of new programs/projects, to identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, to strengthen relationships with the people we serve.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    We share feedback with: the people we serve, our staff, our board, our funders, our community partners.

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to: it is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback.

  • What significant change resulted from feedback

    Kristi House began its initiative to improve client engagement in 2018. The project involved enhancing our processes and approach to improve support to parents and caregivers of victims who are reticent or anxious about treatment. We found that parents were often too upset, fearful, or distrusting to accept the no-cost, proven services we offer. We added a full-time, bilingual Family Engagement Specialist, simplified trilingual materials, and worked to improve our communication with parents so that they could better understand services, and their necessity for their child’s emotional healing and future wellbeing. Our goals were to increase our rates of Intakes, Therapy Acceptance and Case Closures, all of which showed significant improvement in 2019 compared to 2018.

Financials

Kristi House, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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This organization has no recorded board members.

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 08/28/2020

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Keywords

children, abuse, violence, sexual abuse, internet crime, therapy, social work