Wildlife Messengers

Films for Conservation

Richmond, VA   |  https://wildlifemessengers.org/

Mission

Wildlife Messengers is a nonprofit organization with the purpose of making scientific and educational films, photographs, and audio recordings to promote nature conservation, mainly in countries with lower industrial bases, and to distribute them to national and international audiences. The targeted audiences include government authorities, elementary and middle schools, local indigenous communities, and non-governmental organizations. We will evaluate and publish the impact of such conservation films. We also will establish an online archive of amateur, semi-professional, and professional nature conservation films, photographs, and audio recordings to make them available for the public.

Ruling year info

2017

Treasurer

George Olah PhD

President

Cintia Garai PhD

Main address

5645 Hard Rock Place

Richmond, VA 23230 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

82-1888245

NTEE code info

Natural Resource Conservation and Protection (C30)

Wildlife Preservation/Protection (D30)

Film, Video (A31)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990-N.

Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Today many beautiful wildlife films are being produced, and they all try to bring nature closer to their audience. Some of them even mention conservation issues. However, it is not easy to make the general public understand complex issues such as climate change. The result is that many people become overwhelmed with the problems, and they don't want to think about depressing topics that they feel incapable to change. There is an increasing need for the human population to do something about all sorts of conservation issues. Nature documentaries should show not only the problems, but also possible solutions to encourage people to act in a pro-nature way.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

The Indonesian Parrot Project documentary

In collaboration with the Indonesian Parrot Project we plan to make a conservation documentary about their very important work in Indonesia in the protection of several parrot species.
https://wildlifemessengers.org/ipp

Population(s) Served
Adults
Indigenous peoples

​The Macaw Project - Biologists, Ecotourists and Local Communities for the Amazonian Rainforest (www.macawmovie.com), is a 26-minute documentary of macaw conservation research filmed in the Peruvian tropical rainforest. The documentary was made with the aim to direct public attention towards the problems that macaws and other creatures face in their natural habitat and the importance of scientific conservation research in this region. This film differs from previous nature documentaries because it is filmed mainly by the researchers themselves; something that is rarely seen on the screen. We explain the newest methods of conservation biology and present up-to-date findings in a comprehensible way in this spectacular movie.

The Macaw Project also seeks to provide an alternative solution for biodiversity conservation: an internationally applicable model that can help to protect highly biodiverse places in many different regions of the Earth. Our model incorporates scientific research, eco-tourism, and the collaboration of local communities to live in their ecosystem in a sustainable way.

We would like to express our deepest gratitude for the kindness of our many supporters that made this film a reality via a crowdfunding campaign: http://igg.me/at/macawmovie.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Indigenous peoples

The Macaw Kingdom (https://wildlifemessengers.org/macaw-kingdom) is an award-winning documentary featuring the everyday work of scientists in the Tambopata region of Peru, and showing how they collect important scientific data to conserve this biodiversity hotspot. It was a winner in the section of International Film Review / Scientific documentaries at the International Nature Film Festival Gödöllő in 2018.

After years of preparation, zoologist George Olah finally got what he wanted. A special permission from the government of Peru. The 50+ page document gave him access to the Holy Grail of parrot researchers: the Candamo Basin, in the Peruvian Amazon. A place where wildlife exists without any human disturbance since the beginning of times. Surrounded by the foothills of the Andes, the Candamo Basin hosts one of the very few uninhabited tropical rainforest of the world. Not even native tribes had settled here and decades had passed since the last camera team dared to sail the hostile rapids of the Candamo river.

In February, 2016 the nine members of an international scientific expedition finally got onboard of an Amazonian motorized canoe. It took 4 days for them to reach the location. After setting up their base camp in the rainforest, researchers climbed giant trees, investigated nest hollows, captured and tagged young macaws and collected blood samples and feathers for genetic analysis. But doing serious scientific work in the Amazon is not an easy feat. Jaguars visit the camp, wasps attack the climbers and parasites hunt and bite every free piece of skin. Despite all the challenges the team returns to the lab with the invaluable samples that can help us understand the status of an isolated parrot population.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Academics

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of film festivals participated

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Number of film festivals worldwide, where our documentaries were selected and screened.

Number of sector award nominations earned by the organization

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Number of awards our documentaries won at film festivals worldwide.

Number of Facebook followers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of overall donors

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of stories successfully placed in the media

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Number of articles we have published in print or online media.

Total number of screenings held

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This metric shows how many times we screened our films and videos to the public in movie screenings, presentations, meetings, and TV broadcastings.

Number of casework interviews performed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Number of interviews we gave to news agencies, TV channels, or radios.

Number of Subscribers on YouTube

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The more people subscribe to our YouTube channel, the more people we can reach with our wildlife conservation focussed films and videos. This metric indicated the number of new subscribes per year.

Watch time (in hours) of our films/videos on YouTube

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The total number of hours our wildlife conservation focussed videos were watched on YouTube over a given year.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Conservation films should be made not only to entertain, but also to induce behaviour change. This is what our organisation, Wildlife Messengers, aims to do. The messages of our films are based on scientific results, supervised by academics and researchers active on the ground. Before starting a project, we get prepared about the knowledge and attitude of our audiences. So when we make a film, we tailor it based on research not only on the conservation issues themselves, but also on the audiences.

We collaborate with organizations, scientists, conservationists, and experts who are familiar with the topic. Scientific supervision should accompany every phase of the film production, from research of background information through the filming process to the postproduction in the studio.

We conduct thorough research before the filming phase, during the preproduction, about the conservation issue, the challenges, the audience to be addressed, the attitude and motivation of the target audience, and the desired behaviour change.

We are scientists, conservationists and filmmakers, with extended experience in the field of filmmaking, conservation and research in remote areas, such as in Peru or in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. On our website you can find several of our film credentials as examples of how we try to make a difference.

You can find our previous film credentials on our website, including The Macaw Kingdom, The Macaw Project, and Rhinos in the Fridge.
Our next project is about parrot conservation in Indonesia.
We constantly look for conservation organisations and issues that could use conservation films to achieve better results.

Financials

Wildlife Messengers
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Wildlife Messengers

Board of directors
as of 2/25/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Cintia Garai

Wildlife Messengers

George Olah

Wildlife Messengers

Cintia Garai

Wildlife Messengers

Robert Carrubba

Wildlife Messengers

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? No
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? No
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? No
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 01/03/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male
Disability status
Person without a disability

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data