Agriculture, Food, Nutrition

FOOD for Lane County

Because no one should be hungry.

Mission

FOOD for Lane County (FFLC) is a private, nonprofit food bank dedicated to alleviating hunger by creating access to food. We accomplish this by soliciting, collecting, rescuing, growing, preparing and packaging food for distribution to a network of social service agencies and programs, and through public awareness, education and community advocacy.

Ruling Year

1986

2018

Stephen Mallery Mallery Financial 2017

Main Address

770 Bailey Hill Rd

Eugene, OR 97402 USA

Keywords

Food, Food Bank, Emergency Food, Hunger, Food Security, Gardens, Meal Sites, Food Rescue, Food Repackaging

EIN

93-0888347

 Number

3903879934

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Food Banks, Food Pantries (K31)

Food Service, Free Food Distribution Programs (K30)

Disaster Preparedness and Relief Services (M20)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Social Media

Programs + Results

What we aim to solve New!

FOOD for Lane County is a private, nonprofit food bank dedicated to alleviating hunger by creating access to food. We accomplish this by soliciting, collecting, rescuing, growing, preparing and packaging food for distribution to a network of social service agencies and programs, and through public awareness, education and community advocacy. Making food easily available to the people who need it is at the core of our commitment to serve. FFLC serves the emergency food needs for the 369,519 people living in Lane County, Oregon. The 7.6 million pounds of food distributed last year resulted in five million meals for those in need. Our programs help low-income individuals and families obtain nutritious food when they cannot afford to buy it. FFLC is widely recognized for both developing creative solutions to alleviate hunger and for supporting the empowerment of clients, social service agencies and large numbers of community volunteers in the development and promotion of self-sufficiency.

Our programs

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Food Distribution Network

Family Dinner Program

Gardens

Summer Food Program

Meals on Wheels

Nutrition Education

Rural Delivery

Extra Helping

Senior Grocery

Produce Plus

Where we workNew!

Our Results

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one. These quantitative program results are self-reported by the organization, illustrating their committment to transparency, learning, and interest in helping the whole sector learn and grow.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Number of people within the organization's service area accessing food aid

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

Economically disadvantaged, low-income, and poor people

Related program

Food Distribution Network

Context notes

This metric is the number of individuals who accessed food from the emergency food box program. The numbers reflect fiscal years and not calendar years.

Percentage of participants who report that they are able to meet their food needs for the month with this service.

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

Economically disadvantaged, low-income, and poor people

Related program

Food Distribution Network

Context notes

This information is collected through the Hunger Factors Survey, which is administered at food box pantries every two to three years. It demonstrates that the program is accomplishing its goal.

Charting Impact

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What is the organization aiming to accomplish?

What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?

What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?

How will they know if they are making progress?

What have and haven't they accomplished so far?

Our Strategic Plan for 2018-2020 includes these strategic directions: 1. Ensure that FOOD for Lane County's facilities remain adaptable and adequately sized to allow for efficient operations and sustainable growth to better serve the community.
2. Address community needs through expanding existing programming and developing innovative programming to reach identified populations and high needs areas.
3. Work toward our vision of eliminating hunger in Lane County by focusing on programs, partnerships, and activities that affect hunger's root causes.

1. Adjust emergency food and supplemental programs as community needs change
2. Focus on feeding programs that help the increasing senior population
3. Focus on programs that meet the needs of children and youth
4. Develop programs and support efforts that help service users learn skills to obtain and maintain employment or stretch existing financial resources
5. Increase access to healthy food and nutrition information through healthcare partnerships
6. Partner with affordable housing sites for coordinated service delivery, education, and advocacy
7. Expand education efforts to increase the ability to grow and prepare healthy food

FFLC has been feeding those who are in need of food for 33 years. Our programs and services accomplished the following during fiscal year 2016-17: Distributed 5,166,993 pounds of food to 31 pantries in our Food Distribution Network, which provided 95,594 Emergency Food Boxes; served approximately 53,800 hot meals to children this summer at 56 sites through the Summer Food Program; rescued, prepared and packaged a record amount of food—more than a million pounds—through our Food Rescue Express (FREX) program; In 2016-17 our Gardens Program grew and harvested over 155,000 pounds of fresh, organic produce from FFLC's two educational gardens; delivered over 7,000 Weekend Snack Packs to elementary school-aged children in need; the Rural Delivery program provided rural Lane County residents with 197,751 pounds of produce, dairy, and perishable items; the Extra Helping program provided 1,724 low-income households access to fresh produce and dairy items.
FFLC programs and partnerships respond to the immediate crisis of hunger while other programs help individuals and families address chronic food insecurity through self-sufficiency and education programs. The majority of the food we distribute is given to clients at our partner agencies through our Emergency Food Box Program. The eligibility criteria for this program are: household income at or below 185% of the federal poverty level or currently participating in the Food Stamp Program (Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program - SNAP), Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), Social Security Income (SSI) or Low Income Energy Assistance Program (LIEAP).
As the second largest food bank in Oregon, FFLC is a member of the Oregon Food Bank Network, United Way of Lane County and a distribution partner of Feeding America, the national food bank network.

Each strategic direction has a management team member who stewards, oversees, and is accountable for the delivery of the proposed actions and results. Each strategic action has a staff member or team of staff who are responsible for the completion of the action. Progress on the Strategic Plan is reported to the Board of Directors and FFLC staff every six months. Staff make adjustments as needed in our expectations and our annual work plans as our environment, capabilities, and possibilities change over the three-year period.

FOOD for Lane County has successfully met the food needs for the emergency food system for over 30 years. We have adapted and responded to changes in community demographics by expanding outreach to multicultural populations, seniors, and children. We have responded to changes in food supply by creating produce-only programs and sourcing and growing our own food. Nutrition education offers participants a chance to learn to use the food they get from a food program, and gardening education teaches participants to grow their own food. Our future holds the development of a job training program that provides short-term vocational training to help people with skills that lead to jobs that create self-sufficiency. We have purchased a new warehouse space, which will be ready for our use in the spring of 2018.

External Reviews

External Assessments

Evaluated via the Impact Genome Project (2017)

Affiliations & Memberships

Feeding America

Financials

FOOD for Lane County

Fiscal year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

Need more info on this nonprofit?

Need more info on this nonprofit?

FREE: Gain immediate access to the following:

  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2017, 2016 and 2016
A Pro report is also available for this organization for $125.
Click here to view a Sample Report.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Need more info?

FREE: Gain immediate access to the following:

  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2017, 2016 and 2016
A Pro report is also available for this organization for $125.
Click here to see what's included.

Board Leadership Practices

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?

Yes

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?

Yes

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

Yes

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?

Yes

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?

Yes

Organizational Demographics

In order to support nonprofits and gain valuable insight for the sector, GuideStar worked with D5—a five-year initiative to advance diversity, equity, and inclusion in philanthropy—in creating a questionnaire. This section is a voluntary questionnaire that empowers organizations to share information on the demographics of who works in and leads organizations. To protect the identity of individuals, we do not display sexual orientation or disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff. Any values displayed in this section are percentages of the total number of individuals in each category (e.g. 20% of all Board members for X organization are female).

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Gender

Race & Ethnicity

Sexual Orientation

This organization reports that it does not collect this information for Board Members.

Disability

This organization reports that it does not collect this information for Board Members.

Diversity Strategies

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We track retention of staff, board, and volunteers across demographic categories
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We track income levels of staff, senior staff, and board across demographic categories
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We track the age of staff, senior staff, and board
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We track the diversity of vendors (e.g., consultants, professional service firms)
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We have a diversity committee in place
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We have a diversity manager in place
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We have a diversity plan
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We use other methods to support diversity
Diversity notes from the nonprofit
FFLC is an equal opportunity provider and employer. FFLC adheres to the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s nondiscrimination policy: The USDA prohibits discrimination against its customers on the bases of race, color, national origin, age, disability, sex, gender identity, religion, reprisal, and where applicable, political beliefs, marital status, familial or parental status, sexual orientation, or all or part of an individual’s income is derived from any public assistance program, in any program or activity conducted or funded by the Department. In addition, two of our organizational values are: Diversity: We ensure that culturally appropriate food assistance is readily available to diverse populations through programs that reduce barriers to access. We encourage and value diversity among our staff, volunteers and the people we serve. Service with Dignity: We deliver all services with respect and compassion.