Community Resource Center, Inc.

Success Strategies for Colorado Nonprofits

Denver, CO   |  http://crcamerica.org/

Mission

Community Resource Center's mission is to support, strengthen, and galvanize change-makers across the nonprofit ecosystem, working together to create a more equitable Colorado. Community Resource Center (CRC) is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization that provides professional development opportunities, resources, and customized training to nonprofits and community-based organizations in Colorado. CRC empowers nonprofits to fulfill their missions by building capacity, strengthening skills, and providing strategies for success.

Notes from the nonprofit

Community Resource Center (CRC) was founded in 1981. The initial mission was to assist organizations that used community organizing to promote social change in Denver’s inner city. By 1984, the mission expanded to encompass the broad range of nonprofit organizations and community groups that provide services throughout Colorado. CRC has responded to the needs of the sector by continually developing new ways to serve Colorado’s nonprofits. For over 40 years, CRC has been serving nonprofits across the state in order to build our sector’s capacity and in turn build more resilient communities. We know that our success has been a direct result of the energy of activists, dreamers, and doers, who believe we can fix what has been broken or never worked. Through collaboration and commitment to a better future for all, we will improve our sector and continue to strengthen our communities throughout Colorado.

Ruling year info

1981

Chief Executive Officer

Maria Fabula

Main address

789 Sherman Street Suite 210

Denver, CO 80203 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

84-0838406

NTEE code info

Community Improvement, Capacity Building N.E.C. (S99)

Fund Raising and/or Fund Distribution (B12)

Rural (S32)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Rural Action Network (RAN)

The Rural Action Network (RAN) works to build nonprofit capacity, foster relationships, and regional collaboration which leads to increased grant dollars awarded to rural communities. The goals of RAN are to:
1) Convene a network of change-makers across the nonprofit ecosystem to tackle persistent issues in rural Colorado.
2) Develop & cultivate rural leadership to more effectively lead within their organizations and communities.
3) Align and increase the giving of philanthropy with rural nonprofits to support thriving and just communities across rural Colorado.

CRC’s comprehensive ongoing engagement and capacity building for rural communities including Rural Philanthropy Days™ (RPD) conferences, Regional Leadership Committees (RLCs), Virtual Funder Roundtables, and a Rural Advisory Committee. In 2021 RAN served 1,545 individuals from 56 counties across Colorado.

Population(s) Served

CRC published the inaugural edition of the Colorado Grants Guide™ in 1991, providing the first comprehensive guide to funding sources for Colorado nonprofits. This database empowers nonprofits to connect with foundations whose grantmaking initiatives align with their work. By streamlining grant research, nonprofits can focus development efforts on cultivating relationships with potential funding partners, leading to more financially stable organizations. In 2001, CRC established an online version with a continuously updated searchable database and . launched a new platform in 2022 offering a more streamlined process for researching funders and grant opportunities.

Population(s) Served

Adopted by Community Resource Center in 2015, this established program equips nonprofits to effectively advocate for their missions and to build inclusive, civic programs which engage their clients and communities.

Population(s) Served
Adults

More than 5,100 nonprofit organizations operate within rural Colorado. These organizations play a vital role in improving the quality of life in Colorado’s communities and providing services that alleviate poverty, addressing everything from transitional housing to early childhood education to strengthening local food systems. Serving as a Volunteer in Service to America (VISTA) member, members gain professional skills, collaborate with local, regional, and state leaders, learn more about a new community, and get first-hand experience for future employment. VISTA members enable an organization to turn dream projects into reality. They build the organizational, operational, programmatic, and financial capacity of nonprofits that serve communities with less access to resources, building on their own strengths to alleviate poverty. In order to build the capacity of rural nonprofits in Colorado, CRC provides a number of AmeriCorps VISTA members to nonprofit partners across the state.

Population(s) Served

CRC launched a new national service opportunity in 2022, the Colorado Healthcare Corps (CHC), in collaboration with the offices of Governor Polis, Lt. Governor Primavera, Serve Colorado, and the Colorado Departments of Public Health & Environment and Labor & Employment. The goal of this program is to provide urgently needed capacity to healthcare facilities, which are experiencing a historic shortage of skilled workers, which is driven and exacerbated by the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic as healthcare workers continue to leave the field. In addition to meeting these urgent needs, the program will provide a pathway to enter or reenter high-demand careers in the healthcare industry for 150 Healthcare Corps members who are entering or reentering the healthcare field to work in-person in understaffed roles such as certified nursing aides, qualified medication administrators, medical assistants, or other non-medical support services.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Awards

H. Chase Stone Award of Excellence- Community 2008

El Pomar Foundation

Comcast Inclusiveness Award 2007

American Red Cross, Mile High Chapter

Colorado Ethics in Business Award 1995

Samaritan Institute

Outstanding Service Program Award 2021

America’s Service Commission

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of referrals to resources offered

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

In 2021, CRC staff members made referrals to 207 individuals or organizations for services being sought.

Number of convenings hosted by the organization

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

In 2021 CRC organized and hosted, both virtually and in person, 311 convenings across the state of Colorado, including 51 trainings.

Number of conferences held

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

In 2021, we held two Rural Philanthropy Days conferences safely in person, despite the pandemic and served 317 nonprofit professionals.

Number of conference attendees

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Rural Action Network (RAN)

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

In 2021, we held two Rural Philanthropy Days conferences safely in person, despite the pandemic and served 317 nonprofit professionals.

Total dollar amount of grants awarded

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

In 2021, CRC was awarded over $3 million in grants.

Number of training workshops

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Served over 1,300 individuals via 48 public and private training workshops and convenings throughout Colorado.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

CRC has a reputation for tackling difficult issues with its “hands on" practical approach to organizational problem solving and the development of strong and lasting community leadership. In short – CRC's goal is to help other organizations fulfill their missions.

Strategic Goals:
Goal 1: CRC equips individuals within our sector with knowledge and resources to more effectively lead within their organizations and communities.

Goal 2: CRC strengthens the organizational health of our partners so they can better meet their missions, with a focus on impact and equity.

Goal 3: CRC convenes networks across the nonprofit ecosystem to catalyze community-centered power to lead transformational change.

Goal 4: CRC invests in our own organizational and financial infrastructure to ensure we are well-positioned and able to meet the needs of our partners and community.

CRC empowers nonprofits to fulfill their missions by building capacity, strengthening skills, and providing strategies for success. Over the past 40+ years, CRC has worked with thousands of organizations in Front Range and rural communities throughout Colorado. CRC has worked to convene organizations and communities to expand resources and address important community issues and while building a network of partners and supporters.

To meet our strategic goals, we develop the skills and increases the knowledge of nonprofit leaders, staff, and volunteers through professional development opportunities. CRC affects change within organizations by engaging many levels of stakeholders and promoting meaningful organizational culture change. We also work alongside nonprofits, government entities, foundations, and other community stakeholders creating broader connections and impact within the community.

For over 40 years, CRC has worked with thousands of organizations in Front Range and rural communities throughout Colorado. CRC has worked to convene organizations and communities to expand resources and address important community issues and while building a network of partners and supporters.

In 1990, CRC founded the Rural Philanthropy Days (RPD) conference.
In 1990, CRC launched the Colorado Nonprofit Leadership and Management Program for Executive Directors.
In 1991, CRC launched the Colorado Grants Guide.
In 1995, CRC received The Samaritan Institute Award from the Colorado Ethics in Business Awards Committee for illustrating the importance of ethical values in its community work.
In 2001, CRC took the lead in creating Save Our Section 8 (SOS 8), a coalition of tenants of Section 8 housing, to press for the preservation of current subsidized housing and the creation of new low-income housing initiatives. By 2003, SOS8 had become an independent 501(c)(3), led by a board of Section 8 tenants, with its own staff and office.
In 2001, CRC launched the online version of the Colorado Grants Guide.
In 2003, CRC launched NPower Colorado in 2003 as a technology resource center for nonprofit organizations.
In December 2006, Steve Graham, CRC’s Executive Director, passed away unexpectedly.
From 2010 to 2019, in partnership with Philanthropy CO and the CO Nonprofit, CRC executed the C3 Forum.
In 2015, CRC acquired the Colorado Participation Project.
In 2013, Maria Fabula became CRC’s new President and Chief Executive Officer.
From 2013 to 2016, CRC collaborated with partners to host a statewide listening tour for funders across rural Colorado.
In 2014 CRC established the statewide AmeriCorps VISTA Program.
In 2017, CRC established the Root Causes Network, to provide a permanent infrastructure to build the capacity of human service nonprofits to advance inclusive and community-centered policy.
In 2017, CRC hosted the first annual State of the Sector event.
In 2018 CRC became a certified service enterprise organization.
In 2020, CRC developed the Rural Action Network (RAN) as an overarching umbrella for rural work that serves as a comprehensive model for rural engagement.
In 2020 and 2021, CRC advanced the Colorado COVID Containment Corps (CCRC), a national service program which recruited AmeriCorps members to help curb the spread of COVID-19 by providing critical capacity to the State of Colorado with contact tracing and case investigation and ultimately serving more than 21,000 people.
In 2021, CRC accepted the America’s Service Commissions Outstanding Service Program award for its efforts providing critical capacity to the State of Colorado in the CCRC.
In 2022, CRC launched the Colorado Healthcare Corps in collaboration with the offices of Governor Polis, Lt. Governor Primavera, Serve Colorado, and the Colorado Depts of Public Health & Environment and Labor & Employment to address the critical shortage of skilled healthcare workers
In 2022 CRC’s annual budget is $8.3 million and employs 33 regular staff members, in addition to temporary staff, interns and volunteers.
In 2022, CRC registered the Rural Philanthropy Days and RPD Trademark on the US Principal Registry

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Community meetings/Town halls, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

Financials

Community Resource Center, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Community Resource Center, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 06/14/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Patricia Greer

Assistant Professor

Term: 2023 - 2018


Board co-chair

Leslie Baldwin

Boettcher Foundation

Term: 2020 - 2026

Aaron Miltenberger

Boys and Girls Club

Patricia Greer

University of Denver

Leslie Baldwin

Boettcher Foundation

Lorni Sharrow

Moye & White, LLP

Jaclyn Lensen

Colorado Health Foundation

Lee Wheeler-Berliner

Colorado Workplace Development Council

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 5/30/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Hispanic/Latino/Latina/Latinx
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data