SILVER2023

First Community Capital Inc

Empowering Entrepreneurs; Strengthening Communities

Temecula , CA   |  https://www.fccbi.org

Mission

Our mission is to foster economic justice and opportunity by providing access to capital and technical assistance to economically disadvantage micro and rural businesses. Our emphasis is on those businesses owned by people of color including women, veterans, refugees, immigrants, and prisoner reentry individuals.

Ruling year info

2020

Principal Officer

Jay Diallo

Main address

26111 Ynez Rd B30

Temecula , CA 92591 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

84-3804891

NTEE code info

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (J01)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

irst Community Capital (FCC) aims to address the problem of economic inequality and underinvestment in underserved communities, particularly low-income individuals, minority communities, and rural populations. These communities often lack access to affordable financing, technical assistance, and other resources needed to start and grow businesses, develop affordable housing, and promote economic development. FCC's goal is to provide these communities with the resources and support they need to build more sustainable and equitable local economies, reduce poverty and unemployment, and create opportunities for long-term financial stability and prosperity. They also advocate for policies that promote economic inclusion and address systemic barriers to economic opportunity in underserved communities.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Microlending and Technical Assistance

First Community Capital help low-income entrepreneurs who lack sufficient training and education to gain access to capital and thereby delivering long-term economic small businesses recovery and resiliency.

We often lend to borrowers that may not meet mainstream institutions underwriting criteria, helping to bridge the gap between conventional lending standards and the needs of hard-to-reach borrowers.

Population(s) Served
Ethnic and racial groups
Social and economic status

Where we work

Affiliations & memberships

CDFI Certified 2021

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of businesses developed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Multiracial people, People of African descent, People of Latin American descent, Economically disadvantaged people, Immigrants and migrants

Related Program

Microlending and Technical Assistance

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Total dollars loaned to businesses

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Multiracial people, People of African descent, People of Latin American descent, Economically disadvantaged people, Immigrants and migrants

Related Program

Microlending and Technical Assistance

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of loaned made to businesses

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Multiracial people, People of African descent, People of Latin American descent, Economically disadvantaged people, Immigrants and migrants

Related Program

Microlending and Technical Assistance

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

First Community Capital (FCC) is a non-profit community development financial institution (CDFI) based in California, USA. Its primary goal is to provide financial resources and support to underserved and underrepresented communities, businesses, and individuals, with a focus on empowering low-income individuals, minority communities, and rural populations.

FCC seeks to achieve this goal by providing affordable financing, technical assistance, and capacity building services to small businesses, affordable housing developers, and community organizations. They also aim to promote economic development and job creation in disadvantaged areas through their lending and investment activities.

In addition to providing financial resources, FCC strives to create a more equitable and just society by advocating for policies that support economic inclusion, affordable housing, and sustainable community development. They work to build strong partnerships with local community organizations, government agencies, and other stakeholders to leverage resources and maximize impact.

Overall, FCC's mission is to build stronger, more resilient communities by increasing access to capital, promoting economic opportunity, and supporting community-driven solutions to address systemic challenges faced by underserved communities.

First Community Capital (FCC) employs several strategies to eradicate poverty and promote economic development in underserved communities, including:

Providing affordable financing: FCC offers loans and other financial products with favorable terms and lower interest rates than traditional lenders, making it easier for small businesses, affordable housing developers, and community organizations to access the capital they need to start or expand their operations.

Offering technical assistance and capacity building: FCC provides technical assistance, training, and other resources to help borrowers develop business plans, improve financial management, and build capacity. This support helps increase the likelihood of success for these organizations, creating more sustainable local economies and reducing poverty.

Investing in community-driven solutions: FCC partners with local community organizations to identify and invest in projects that address the specific needs of underserved communities. This approach ensures that resources are directed to where they can have the most impact, and that the solutions are tailored to the unique challenges facing each community.

Advocating for policies that promote economic inclusion: FCC works to influence policies at the local, state, and national levels to create a more equitable and just economic system that benefits all members of society, particularly those who are most marginalized.

Overall, FCC's strategies aim to empower underserved communities by providing them with the tools, resources, and support they need to build sustainable local economies, create jobs, and reduce poverty.

First Community Capital (FCC) has several capabilities that enable it to effectively meet its goals of eradicating poverty and promoting economic development in underserved communities, including:

Expertise in community development finance: FCC has extensive experience in providing affordable financing, technical assistance, and capacity building to small businesses, affordable housing developers, and community organizations. Its staff members are experts in community development finance and have a deep understanding of the challenges facing underserved communities.

Partnerships with local organizations: FCC has strong partnerships with local community organizations, government agencies, and other stakeholders. These partnerships enable FCC to leverage resources and collaborate on projects that promote economic development and reduce poverty.

Access to capital: As a community development financial institution (CDFI), FCC has access to funding from a variety of sources, including government grants, private foundations, and impact investors. This funding enables FCC to provide affordable financing and other resources to underserved communities.

Advocacy and policy expertise: FCC has a strong advocacy and policy team that works to influence policies at the local, state, and national levels. This team uses its expertise in community development finance and its understanding of the needs of underserved communities to advocate for policies that promote economic inclusion and address systemic barriers to economic opportunity.

Overall, FCC's capabilities enable it to effectively meet its goals of eradicating poverty and promoting economic development in underserved communities by providing affordable financing, technical assistance, capacity building, and advocating for policies that promote economic inclusion.

First Community Capital (FCC) has made significant progress in its mission to promote economic development and reduce poverty in underserved communities. Some of FCC's notable achievements include:

Financing over $500 thousand in community development projects: Since its inception, FCC has provided over $500 thousand in financing to small businesses, supporting job creation and economic development in underserved communities.

Supporting small businesses and job creation: FCC has provided financing and technical assistance to over 350 small businesses, helping them to start or grow their operations and create jobs in their communities.

Advocating for policies that promote economic inclusion: FCC has been a strong advocate for policies that promote economic inclusion and address systemic barriers to economic opportunity in underserved communities. Its advocacy efforts have helped to influence policies at the local, state, and national levels, creating a more equitable and just economic system.

Overall, FCC's progress demonstrates its commitment to promoting economic development and reducing poverty in underserved communities. Its efforts have helped to create jobs and support small businesses, contributing to more sustainable and equitable local economies.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We share the feedback we received with the people we serve, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection

Financials

First Community Capital Inc
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

First Community Capital Inc

Board of directors
as of 11/26/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mark Davis

Sun Flower Bank

Term: 2022 - 2024

Vincent McCoy

Luvicent, Inc

Edward Johnson

JCH Management Group LLC

Fatimoh Muhammed

Wamufat International

Karen Suarez

Uplift San Bernardino

Kelly Rivas

Kelly Mortgage Center

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 11/26/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American
Gender identity
Male

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 07/09/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.