RED BARN FOUNDATION

Faith, Hope, and Love

aka The Red Barn   |   Leeds, AL   |  www.theredbarn.org

Mission

The mission of The Red Barn is to promote and provide equine assisted services to low-income individuals with disabilities and special circumstances.

Notes from the nonprofit

The Red Barn is a place of faith, hope, and love. We provide children and adults with physical, cognitive, and emotional disabilities equine assisted horsemanship, equine assisted therapy, inclusive academic enrichment classes (equine assisted learning), and recreational activities including art education. We also serve children who are considered at-risk or have special circumstances, as well as active or inactive military personnel and their families. Our unique programs offer recreational and therapeutic activities to an average of 100 individuals per week. Even throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, our donors rallied behind us and we made significant progress fulfilling our mission during that "down" time. While the activities offered might have looked a little different than before, our students knew that we had not forgotten them and that the barn would still be there for them when it became safe to meet again in-person.

Ruling year info

2012

Executive Director

Joy O'Neal

Main address

2722 Bailey Road

Leeds, AL 35094 USA

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Formerly known as

Spirit of Hope Youth Ranch

EIN

45-2593191

NTEE code info

Children's and Youth Services (P30)

Animal Related Activities N.E.C. (D99)

Developmentally Disabled Services/Centers (P82)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Many children and adults with special needs and circumstances find themselves without appropriate, safe, and affordable extracurricular activities. This can leave people without healthy outlets and opportunities for growth and fun. Additionally, many families with children who have the need for speech, occupational, and physical therapy struggle to afford those therapies. The Red Barn seeks to provide a place of faith, hope, and love where people from all socioeconomic situations can strengthen their minds, bodies, and souls while working with horses.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Equine Assisted Learning

Educational camps and classes are taught by employees with knowledge of disabilities and experience adapting activities to encourage participation. Our camps and classes give children a chance to participate in educational and recreational activities in an outdoor setting. Sessions are "ground based," meaning that participants do not ride. Our animals, like rabbits, goats, and horses, provide a chance for children to learn life skills through a variety of interactions. Examples of interactions include observations of herd dynamics, leading activities, grooming, or inclusion of animals in the learning activities.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
People with disabilities
At-risk youth
Low-income people

Riding lessons at the barn are taught by Certified Therapeutic Riding Instructors. Lessons focus on proper riding position and riding skills. The strategies for riding skills are adapted based on the abilities of the rider. The rider is taught how to use their body to influence the horse's movement.

Population(s) Served

This program is defined by the participants rather than the activity.  Participants in this program are veterans, active or inactive military personnel, and their families.  Offered free of charge to participants.

Population(s) Served
Veterans
Families

Those interested in learning about equine assisted therapies, improving their horsemanship skills, becoming an instructor, or opening a similar agency can come and receive relevant training.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Horse Sense is a unique program made possible by the American Legion’s Child Welfare Foundation grant and is provided by The Red Barn and The JAYC Foundation.

Each year, law enforcement officers have thousands of interactions with children who have communicative disorders. These moments can be stressful for both the officer and child. It doesn’t have to be that way. With just a little “horse sense,” officers can learn how to approach a child with special needs or atypical communication skills in a positive way, with positive results for everyone. That’s where the horse comes in. Horses are similar to a child with a communication disorder. They will let you know when they’re scared, when they need space, and when they trust you. Reading body language and adjusting your approach accordingly can make all the difference in your experience. And, that’s what horses can teach us about interacting with children diagnosed with communication disorders like autism, Tourette’s Syndrome, cerebral palsy, ADHD and other challenges known to affect communication.

“Horse Sense” is a unique program funded by the American Legion’s Child Welfare Foundation and offered at select barns across the country.

Population(s) Served
People with disabilities
Emergency responders

Occupational therapy sessions are conducted by a licensed Occupational Therapist with specific training on how to safely incorporate the movement of the horse. The goal of therapy sessions is to improve neurological functioning in cognition, body movement, organization, and attention levels to improve function in all environments. Horses provide a rhythmic 3D pattern of movement that is used in an intentional manner to enhance responses to therapy.

Population(s) Served
People with disabilities
At-risk youth
Low-income people
Children and youth
People with disabilities
At-risk youth
Low-income people
Children and youth

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of program hours provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People with disabilities, Children and youth, Foster and adoptive children, Economically disadvantaged people, Veterans

Related Program

Equine Assisted Horsemanship

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

This is the total number of hours provided to clients in all of our programs (Saddle Up, Horse Play, Take the Reins, and Training).

Percentage of lessons taught

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

At-risk youth, People with disabilities, Children and youth, Economically disadvantaged people, Veterans

Related Program

Equine Assisted Horsemanship

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

This is the percentage of lessons taught (out of 100) based on the number of lessons offered each year.

Percentage of parents who report improvements in self-confidence and self-esteem at home

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Percentage of parents who report an improvement in following directions at home

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Percentage of parents who report an improvement in their child's communication skills at home

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The Red Barn aspires to offer the highest quality in equine assisted horsemanship, learning, and therapy. We aspire to grow our programs and develop a scholarship program that allows families to participate regardless of their finances. The Red Barn also aims to be a leader in the special needs and equine assisted services communities by providing training and mentorship to other organizations and professionals in the field.

The Red Barn's programs designed to serve individuals are equine assisted learning, equine assisted horsemanship, equine assisted therapy, a veteran's program, and instructor training. Therapeutic horseback riding lessons are individualized according to the student's goals and adapted according to the student's abilities. They are led by certified instructors who are specifically matched with students and horses suited to their needs, goal-directed, and meticulously recorded for the purpose of evaluation at the end of the term. All camps and classes are inclusive. Research shows that inclusive programs, particularly those incorporating equine assisted services, can improve social interaction, self-regulation and motor skills, provide greater access to the general curriculum, and promote an appreciation of individual differences. The program for veterans offers therapeutic, recreational, and educational activities to active and inactive veterans and their families at no cost. The instructor training program aims to equip the future leaders in special needs and equine assisted services by hosting regular professional development certifications, classes, and workshops.

The Red Barn's program staff are professionally trained to safely and effectively serve our participants. Many of our instructors possess both the Certified Horsemanship Association's certification for Instructors of Riders with Disabilities as well as certification from the Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship, International. Additionally, The Red Barn employs a certified Occupational Therapist, special education teachers, and autism specialists in order to better serve our participants. The Red Barn's Executive Director holds both a certificate in Non-Profit Management as well as a Master's in Public Administration.

The Red Barn also has a strong relationship with community partners to help better meet our goals and serve the community. These partners include Amelia Center, the Lakeshore Foundation, Lifeline Children's Services, JBS, the JAYC Foundation, Mitchell's Place, Magnolia Eating Disorder Clinic, APAC, Full Life Ahead Foundation, United Ability, and local area schools.

The Red Barn faced a tough 2020 like all organizations, but significant progress was still made on strategic planning goals.

One of our strategic goals is to offer excellent equine assisted activities and therapies to meet the needs of those who would not be able to receive services elsewhere. To meet this goal, the following actions were taken:
- Three research studies with the University of Alabama and UAB continued.
- All wait list students were evaluated in person. COVID interrupted this process to an extent, but evaluations are being conducted again.
- Students without compromised immune systems who have a degree of independence riding continued lessons safely throughout the pandemic.

Our strategic goal to have abundant resources was furthered by the following actions:
- Admin staff continued working with The Better Fundraising Company, seeing a slight increase in the amount raised from contributions even during a global pandemic.
- Continued working with the Junior Board, recruiting new members and planning activities to take place post-pandemic.
- Earned the Equus Foundation’s Messenger designation, the highest that can be earned.

Our goal of becoming known as experts in the industry was furthered by a “Barn in a Box” project wherein flow charts, copies of relevant documents, and documentation of processes and procedures are being collected. This project began in 2019 and has launched. Over 140 volunteer management professionals have signed up for the Volunteer Management class, proving a significant need for training in the area. Additional classes are scheduled to launch in 2021.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Case management notes, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback,

Financials

RED BARN FOUNDATION
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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RED BARN FOUNDATION

Board of directors
as of 10/11/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Joy O'Neal

Joy O'Neal

Emmet O'Neal

Alexis Braswell

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Not applicable
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Not applicable
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Not applicable
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Not applicable
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Not applicable

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 03/06/2020

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability