PLATINUM2024

California Policy Center for Intellectual and Developmental Dis

Research, Policy and Action

Sacramento, CA   |  https://cpcidd.org

Mission

The California Policy Center for Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (CPCIDD) is a non-partisan think tank established to inform, support, and improve upon statewide policies that impact the lives of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. The Center's focus is to identify priorities and challenges within the IDD community and provide policy recommendations based on objective, evidence-based research, data, and policy analysis to help inform the community, as well as the policymaking process.

Ruling year info

2023

Executive Director

Teresa Anderson

Director of Outreach and Engagement

David Manson

Main address

1121 L Street Suite 612

Sacramento, CA 95814 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

92-2247132

NTEE code info

Disabled Persons' Rights (R23)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Our organization is dedicated to improving the quality of life and well-being of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD). We recognize that people with IDD face multiple and complex challenges that limit their opportunities and potential. These challenges include shorter life span, higher poverty and unemployment rates, lack of access to quality services and supports, and social exclusion and discrimination. Our organization aims to address these challenges by researching, analyzing and reporting on evidence-based programs and policies that empower people with IDD to achieve their goals and aspirations. We also seek to measure and evaluate the impact and effectiveness of policies using reliable and valid indicators that reflect the needs and preferences of people with IDD and their families. By doing so, we hope to create a more inclusive and equitable society for people with IDD and contribute to the global efforts to advance their human rights and dignity.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Rise-Up IDD Employment Collaborative

In a collaboration between our Policy Center, the California Retailers Association (CRA) and local Regional Center employment vendors, we have launched a research pilot project to determine the efficacy and outcomes of utilizing the National Retail Foundation's RiseUp employment training curriculum for the IDD community to improve employability and employment outcomes. The training is acknowledged and recognized by CRA members as an industry-approved certification in vital retail skills. Our first classroom cohort started in late fall 2023 and we plan on implementing several other cohorts across the 24 month timeline of the project.

The retail industry is America's largest private-sector employer, offering 32 million first jobs, next chances and lifelong careers to people in every community.

The RISE Up program offers training and credentials that teach foundational skills necessary for career success, from customer service and sales to inventory and supply chain management.

Population(s) Served
People with intellectual disabilities

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of meetings with policymakers or candidates

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of policymakers or candidates reached

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of individuals attending briefings and presentations

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of policy guidelines or proposals developed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of stakeholders/stakeholder groups with whom communication has been achieved and expectations shared

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of research or policy analysis products developed, e.g., reports, briefs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of polls conducted with advocacy audience(s)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of demonstration project or pilot sites

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Rise-Up IDD Employment Collaborative

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of briefings or presentations held

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The California Policy Center for Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (CPCIDD) is a non-partisan think tank established to inform, support, and improve upon statewide policies that impact the lives of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. The Centers focus is to identify priorities and challenges within the IDD community and provide policy recommendations based on objective, evidence-based research, data, and policy analysis to help inform the community, as well as the policymaking process.

We aim to gain a deep understanding of some of the most complex issues facing the IDD community, such as access to affordable housing, the severe workforce shortage, employment of people with disabilities, and access to Early Start services for infants and toddlers with disabilities. Our goal is to become a trusted source of information for the IDD community, interested stakeholders, as well as local, county, and statewide policymakers as it relates to issues of importance to the IDD community.

The Center will conduct objective, evidence-based research and analysis on key policy issues affecting the IDD community, such as access, quality, equity, and innovation of services and supports. The Center will also monitor and evaluate the implementation and outcomes of existing and new policies, programs, and initiatives, and provide recommendations for improvement and best practices. The Center will disseminate its research findings and policy recommendations to the IDD community, the legislature, the DDS, and other interested stakeholders through various channels, such as reports, briefs, webinars, podcasts, speaker series, newsletters, and social media.

The Center will foster policy innovation and collaboration by identifying and promoting emerging and promising practices, models, and policy recommendations for the IDD community. The Center will also facilitate dialogue and partnership among diverse stakeholders, such as individuals with IDD, families, advocates, service providers, researchers, policymakers, and funders, to address common challenges and opportunities, and to leverage collective resources and expertise. CPCIDD is a non-profit, non-partisan, organization that must conform to the restrictions associated with political activity and lobbying. However, CPCIDD is permitted to educate the legislature on issues of importance to the IDD community.

The Centers core values of integrity, impact, and inclusion will guide its work and operations, and ensure that it is responsive, accountable, and respectful to the needs and interests of the IDD community and its partners. The Centers vision is to be a trusted and influential policy center that advances the rights, dignity, and well-being of people with IDD in California.

First and foremost, as an organization we hold a deep philosophical belief that our work must be guided by people, and include individuals with IDD so we ensure that our networking includes building relationships with self-advocates and self-advocacy groups throughout the state. Our capability for achieving our goals begins with our Board of Directors and making sure that we have representation that includes people with IDD, family members, service providers, educators, and researchers who all have a connection to the IDD community. The CPCIDD outreaches to the IDD community by attending several different conferences, social media, surveys, focus groups, interview townhalls, and other community events.

The team at CPCIDD has over 30 years of experience serving, supporting, and networking within the IDD community in California. It is through this extensive experience, and long-time relationship in the community, that we are able to build upon existing relationships and foster new relationships with the aim of achieving our goals. We have existing relationships with a network of researchers, policy analysts, and policy experts who have extensive knowledge and expertise specific to the IDD community. We routinely engage in statewide workgroups, pilot projects, and research projects that expand our reach among those who are currently conducting research in various areas such as employment of people with disabilities, housing, and workforce challenges.

Our team is highly skilled at analyzing data from many different sources including various state databases (i.e. Department of Developmental Services, Health and Human Services, Department of Housing, and Department of Justice), and national databases (i.e. National Core Indicators, American Community Survey, Bureau of Labor and Statistics). For data analysis that exceeds the level of expertise within CPCIDDs team, or statistical analysis of research data, CPCIDD collaborates with academic institutions or employs the services of statistical analysis consultants.

We have the capacity to disseminate our research findings, policy recommendations, and publications statewide, through a wide range of channels including our multiple social media platforms, conferences, podcasts, newsletters, website, speaker series, townhalls, collaborations and networks throughout the state.

To date and given that we received startup funding just under one year ago, we have achieved several major accomplishments. We applied for, and received, our 501(C)(3) status so we could operate as a non-profit organization in California. CPCIDD has developed a strong Board and leadership team with diverse backgrounds and a vision to apply policy research and analysis to innovative concepts and ideas that will ultimately lead to improving the lives of people with IDD in California.

CPCIDD launched a pilot program with a community partner to provide a certificated training program to individuals with IDD who are interested in employment in the retail sector. The pilot program is part of the National Retailers Foundation RISE UP program which is a training and credentialing program that provides foundational employability skills to help people land jobs and get promoted in the retail industry. We have developed metrics to evaluate outcomes of the training specific to job placement and retention within the IDD community in California.

In addition, CPCIDD has established a highly visible presence in the state through our social media platforms, stakeholder meetings, newsletter distribution, and speaking engagements. In just under a year we have met and engaged with over 100 stakeholders in the disability community, published and distributed 4 newsletters, maintained a robust social media presence, and completed 2 research reports in the areas of Homelessness and Housing Needs for People with IDD, and Improving Interactions with Law Enforcement and the IDD community.

The next endeavor for the CPCIDD team is to engage in an in-depth study of the direct support professional (DSP) workforce shortage and the impact it has on people with IDD in California. We plan to conduct surveys, in-person interviews, focus groups, townhalls, and other forms of engagement to ensure we have extensive input from the IDD community. Once we have completed collecting the data and information we will produce a report for distribution statewide. In addition, we will continue our efforts to understand the housing needs of individuals with IDD, innovative employment opportunities, as well as the needs of infants and toddlers as it relates to accessing Early Start services in California.

CPCIDD also plans to continue building our on-line and in-person presence via social media, in-person and on-line speaking engagements, newsletter distribution, advancing research and pilot projects, policy analysis, and stakeholder engagements.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We share the feedback we received with the people we serve, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection

Financials

California Policy Center for Intellectual and Developmental Dis
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

California Policy Center for Intellectual and Developmental Dis

Board of directors
as of 03/11/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Rachel Michelin

CALIFORNIA RETAILERS ASSOCIATION

Term: 2023 - 2026


Board co-chair

Olwyn Brown

Carpenters local #713

Term: 2023 - 2026

Kathleen Van Osten

MVM STRATEGY GROUP, LLC

Chip Robertson

WARLAND INVESTMENTS COMPANY

Michael Bernick

DUANE MORRIS LLP

William H Duncan IV

SIERRA COLLEGE

Dr. Barbara Fireston

THE HELP GROUP

Marjorie Solomon, PhD

UC DAVIS MIND INSTITUTE

Darin Lounds

HOUSING CONSORTIUM OF THE EAST BAY (HCEB)

Don Perata

CALIFORNIA STATE SENATE PRESIDENT PRO-TEM EMERITUS

Sean Spence

SELF ADVOCATE

Azucena Garcia-Ferro

SELF ADVOCATE

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Not applicable
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Not applicable

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 3/11/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female
Disability status
Person without a disability

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Multi-Racial/Multi-Ethnic (2+ races/ethnicities)
Gender identity
Male
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability