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ARCHway Institute for Mental Health and Addictive Disorders

We believe in recovery from the disease of addiction.

aka ARCHway Institute for Addictive Disease and Co-Existing Mental Health Disorders   |   Punta Gorda, FL   |  https://thearchwayinstitute.org/

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Mission

Since ARCHway was created in 2013, it has grown to be active in seven states and has helped individuals find resources nationwide. ARCHway and our volunteers focus on: 1. Assisting individuals impacted by addictive diseases and co-existing mental health issues by finding resources, including providing financial assistance for treatment. 2. Providing education on the medical research and best practices concerning the disease of addiction as well as co-existing mental health issues to help change the stigma attached to this disease. 3. Offering hope to families seeking support for recovery. 4. Change the paradigms about addiction.

Ruling year info

2014

Chief Executive Officer

Mrs. Emily Stuckey

Main address

3941 Tamiami Trail STE 3157-53

Punta Gorda, FL 33950 USA

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Formerly known as

ARCHway Institute for Mental Health and Addictive Disorders

EIN

46-2500358

NTEE code info

Alcohol, Drug and Substance Abuse, Dependency Prevention and Treatment (F20)

Fund Raising and/or Fund Distribution (F12)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

In our country, 1 out of every 3 families is dealing with at least one loved one with a substance use disorder and 1 in 10 people over the age of 13 have a substance use disorder. However, only 20% ever seek professional help. The number one reason they don’t ask is because of the stigma attached to this disease. Furthermore, when people do seek professional help, 9 out of 10 people are turned away because of a lack of beds (medical resources) or a lack of funds. For the first time, drug overdose death have exceeded 100,000 within one year. According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, "Provisional data from CDC’s National Center for Health Statistics indicate that there were an estimated 100,306 drug overdose deaths in the United States during 12-month period ending in April 2021, an increase of 28.5% from the 78,056 deaths during the same period the year before." We want to help combat these numbers and let people know that recovery is possible!

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

ARCHway Advocates for HOPE Program

Advocates for Hope are individuals thriving in recovery and caregivers affected by addiction. We offer conversations to individuals and families who don’t know where to turn. We provide emotional support, information, and advocacy for individuals and families regarding options for treatment, recovery housing, or other recovery resources.

Population(s) Served
Substance abusers
Caregivers

The ARCHway HOPE Fund is the primary vehicle by which ARCHway is able to award grants and scholarships to recovery-oriented systems of care including treatment providers, recovery housing providers, recovery community organizations, and prevention. Scholarships have been used for a variety of needs including co-pays for treatment, rent in recovery housing, transportation to and from treatment, community outreach, educational/prevention efforts, and more. ARCHway releases $50,000 in grants and scholarships each year through our ARCHway HOPE Fund.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Adults

Where we work

Affiliations & memberships

The National Peer Recovery Alliance 2020

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Total revenue earned to support advocacy efforts

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Substance abusers

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

An indicator of growth, our revenue comes from our supporters.

Number of Facebook followers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Substance abusers, Caregivers

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We feel this number best represents our educational & awareness efforts. This number includes both Facebook Followers and Newsletter Subscribers to ARCHway Institute.

Total dollar amount of grants awarded

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Substance abusers

Related Program

ARCHway's HOPE Fund Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

An indicator that we do what we say we are going to do by providing financial assistance to increase access to treatment and recovery resources for those in need.

Total number of grants awarded

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Substance abusers

Related Program

ARCHway's HOPE Fund Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This is an extension of the last metric (Value of Grants Giving throughout the Year). Each grant may help one or several individuals who have been diagnosed with a substance use disorder.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Vision: We envision long-term recovery for everyone impacted by substance use and co-occurring mental health disorders.

Mission: ARCHway Institute serves the community by providing education to increase awareness and transform perspectives around substance use and co-occurring mental health disorders. As an organization, we advocate for long-term recovery by providing guidance and financial support to expand access to care and healthy solutions.

We want more individuals and families to find recovery!

ARCHway Institute aims to reduce stigma, increase awareness, and help people heal. We do this through three strategies - education, peer support, and financial assistance to increase access to care.

ARCHway Institute works to educate individuals, families, and communities about substance use and co-occurring mental health disorders. We do this through our speaker series and free seminars and virtual events. We also utilize newsletters, social media, and our website to provide the public with information, resources, and stories of recovery/hope. In addition, we have created and distributed educational videos, and in 2021, we published a book called "Igniting Hope: The Story of a Community Lighting the Way to Recovery" about ARCHway's journey to help people recover. Through this education and being open to telling our own personal stories, we 1) hope to see more people reach out for professional help and 2) hope to see the community at large start changing some of the false notions and stereotypes people have about these disorders.

ARCHway provides peer support through our Advocates for HOPE Program. This program includes people thriving in recovery and caregivers who have been impacted by a loved one's substance use disorder, who can offer caring and compassionate conversation and support as well as guidance around the treatment and recovery resources that are available in the community. Our peers strive to connect people to the professional resources they need in order to recover. ARCHway truly believes in the value that peers bring to the behavioral health field, and so ARCHway has also partnered with the National Peer Recovery Alliance in its work to elevate and empower the peer workforce.

ARCHway also provides financial assistance to increase access to treatment and recovery resources for individuals in need. These grants can help to cover the cost of treatment, recovery housing, transportation, early intervention efforts, peer services, and more. In 2021, ARCHway release over $57,000 in grants, and our goal is to release $70,000 in 2022, so that funding is not a barrier to long-term recovery from the individuals and families impacted.

ARCHway Institute does not provide direct medical treatment, nor do we provide recovery housing. This is a strategic move by the ARCHway Institute to ensure the unbiased intentions of the organization. Our goals are simple: education about the disease and helping individuals and families get the information and professional assistance they need.

ARCHway Institute has a very diverse Board of Directors and staff who understand the needs of the recovery community. Our Board and staff are comprised of several individuals in recovery, several individuals that are caregivers for a loved one with a substance use disorder (SUD), individuals from the criminal justice system, medical doctors, counselors, and clergy. ARCHway Institute balances an understanding of SUD personally and professionally while leveraging this knowledge to meet our goals.

ARCHway institute has teams of staff and/or volunteers that currently work in 7 different states to support our mission. Each year we look towards adding teams in additional communities and additional states. These teams work in the local communities by participating in the Drug-Free Coalitions, running educational events, running fundraising events, and helping individuals and families find the information and resources they need through our Advocates for HOPE Program.

ARCHway is also very active using social media and newsletters to drive our messaging. This includes:
Website: https://thearchwayinstitute.org/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/thearchwayinstitute
Intagram: https://www.instagram.com/advocates4hope/
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/the-archway-institute-for-mental-health-and-addictive-disorders/?viewAsMember=true
Twitter: https://twitter.com/ARCHwayInstitut
Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCWExdtPZDRb2XucgxfojZaQ
Vimeo: https://vimeo.com/archwayinstitute?fbclid=IwAR3alGINHqv5JeCbXQMBVHvYEX2aMoR_IfWHKVaZV52KDIP-Xa5g-HiRUDQ

ARCHway Institute will celebrate its 10 year anniversary in 2022. Over those 10 years, ARCHway Institute has seen steady growth in our metrics -- from followers, donations received, grants released, and number of communities impacted by our messaging.

The metrics of growth in 2021 for the ARCHway Institute were:

- In 2021, ARCHway reached 10,000+ people through our education and awareness efforts.
- In 2021, ARCHway responded to 105 requests for assistance (financial, treatment, housing, peer support, etc.) through our Advocates for HOPE Program. This is a 31% increase from 2020.
- In 2021, ARCHway awarded $57,218 grants to increase access to treatment and recovery resources across the country, a 14% increase from 2020.
- In 2021, ARCHway generated just under $395,000, a 32% increase from 2020. This included a one-time, generous donation through our Legacy of HOPE Program (planned giving / estate planing) that significantly increased our funds raised.
- In 2021, ARCHway added 16 new HOPE Fund Sponsors bringing our total to 76. In 2021, ARCHway brought in $215,000 in donation to the ARCHway HOPE Fund to increase access to treatment and recovery resources for those in need.
- ARCHway launched its Legacy of HOPE Program in late 2020, and now we have 60 people committed. This is an estimated $944,475 in pledges.

In the non-profit fundraising arena, analysis of the prior year's giving is the BEST predictor of the future year's giving. Based on the continued growth in funds raised each year, and the amazing generosity of the ARCHway community, ARCHway is well-positioned to achieve the 2022 budget revenue target of $375,000.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We share the feedback we received with the people we serve, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time

Financials

ARCHway Institute for Mental Health and Addictive Disorders
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

ARCHway Institute for Mental Health and Addictive Disorders

Board of directors
as of 04/24/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Dan Stuckey

Executive - New Business Development - Retired

Term: 2015 - 2025

Dan Stuckey

Donna Whiteley

Professional Counselor at Mercy Hospital

Maurice Clarett

Red Zone

Brian Sieve

Peer Support Specialist

Mark Fitzsimmons

Missouri Judge - Retired

David Ehrlich

Private Equity Investor at Battle Investment Firm

Matt Boggs

President & CEO, Ryker Douglas

Dawn Belamarich

President & CEO, Collaboratory

Kelly Prunty

Previous Founder & Executive Director, Addiction is Real

Laurel Dawson

Chief of Staff, Governor DeWine

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 4/24/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

Transgender Identity

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 04/24/2024

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.