PLATINUM2024

PACT AN ADOPTION ALLIANCE

Honest • Child-Centered • Anti-Racist

aka Pact   |   Emeryville, CA   |  www.pactadopt.org

Mission

Pact, An Adoption Alliance, provides the highest quality adoption services to children of color. Our primary client is the child. In order to serve the child, we address the needs of all the child's parents. We advise families facing a crisis pregnancy and we offer lifelong education to adoptive families and birth families on matters of race and adoption. Our goal is for every child to feel wanted honored and loved, a cherished member of a strong family with proud connections to the rich cultural heritage that is his or her birthright.

Ruling year info

1992

Executive Director

Ms. Beth Hall

Main address

5155 Doyle Street Suite 1

Emeryville, CA 94608 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

94-3148096

NTEE code info

Adoption (P31)

Counseling Support Groups (F60)

Civil Rights, Advocacy for Specific Groups (R20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Pact serves adopted children of color and their families. In every case, the child is always our primary client. In order to best serve children's needs, we provide not only adoptive placement but lifelong education, support, and community for adoptees and their families on issues of adoption and race. Our goal is for every child to feel wanted honored and loved, a cherished member of a strong family with proud connections to the rich cultural heritage that is his or her birthright. We advocate for honesty and authenticity in matters of race and adoption. We strongly believe that adopted children's and adults' connections to birth family and birth heritage should be respected and maintained. We also strive to identify and counteract "adoptism," an unfortunately common social prejudice that challenges the legitimacy of the choice to place a child for adoption or to build a family by adoption. We educate about the pervasive power of race and racism as it intersects with child placement.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Pact Family Camp

A camp like no other
Now in its 17th year, Pact Family Camp is a weeklong summer retreat where adopted children of color of all ages—and their families—share experiences and build community while learning from experts and each other. Pact Family Camp offers children and families life-changing learning experiences—as well as fun family activities, comfortable resort accommodations, and fully catered meals. We create a safe environment where children and their families can speak hard truths about adoption, family, and race among others who understand. Two locations, one West coast, one East coast.

Population(s) Served
Families
Children and youth

The California Adoption Conference is a two-day event featuring talks and workshops for adoptive and foster families, adult adoptees and foster alums, birth parents, and adoption professionals. “Adoption is a lifelong journey,” says Beth Hall, Executive Director of Pact, An Adoption Alliance, and one of the conference organizers. “Placement is only the beginning—everyone involved needs ongoing education and support. That’s why programs like the California Adoption Conference are so important."

The California Adoption Conference is a collaboration between nine Bay Area non-profit organizations that serve youth and families.

Population(s) Served
Parents
Adults

The only program of its kind, “Adoption…It’s Complicated!” draws on both first-hand, personal experiences, and the latest research, to help service providers discuss adoption with honesty, balance, and compassion while offering true options counseling to pregnant women and their families. “Adoption…It’s Complicated!” workshop leaders, themselves first/birth parents whose children have been placed for adoption, offer insights for social workers, options counselors, nurses, therapists, and anyone who might interact with expectant and first/birth parents. Professionals come away with a greater understanding of the needs and experiences of expectant and first/birth parents, both those who make voluntary placements and those whose rights are terminated through the child welfare system.

Population(s) Served
Caregivers
Economically disadvantaged people

Pact's educational programs have a nationwide reputation for excellence, particularly on the subject of adoption and race. We offer a broad range of learning opportunities led by Pact staff as well as other experts in the field. Webinars on topics related to adoption, parenting and race are offered each month offer cutting edge education for parents (adoptive, birth and foster) as well as adoption professionals.

Population(s) Served
Parents
Adults

Pact’s program is designed especially for adopted and fostered teens of color - non-adopted siblings are also invited to participate. Separate Teen and Tween gatherings focus on both social interactions among the youth and mentoring by adult adoptees and fostered adults as well as non-adopted allies of color. Our Mentors/Chaperones have designed a curriculum tailored to adopted and fostered youth of African American, African, Latino, Asian and Native American descent to explore their feelings and experiences related to adoption and race. Often youth who are reluctant to talk about these issues with parents or friends; find comfort and community with our Teen and Tween community. Many participants experience understanding while learning new ways to grow into strong, conscious young adults.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
At-risk youth

The Adoptive Parents of Color Collaborative (APCC) is a group affiliated with Pact, An Adoption Alliance, that is working to uplift the voices, values, and experience of adoptive parents of color.

Although people of color are adopting and fostering at a higher rate (per capita) than White families, very little support exists that reflects the experiences of adoptive families headed by people of color. We want to change that! APPC is a community of and for people of color.

We serve children by supporting the families and communities in which they grow and thrive. By centering our work on the child, we are directly challenging the adoption “industry’s” hyper-focus on the needs and comfort of the adoptive parents, often at the risk of not meeting the needs of the child. By supporting, pushing, and building community for our families we are shifting a narrative with and for adoptees who are being parented by adoptive parents of color.

Population(s) Served
Parents
At-risk youth

Pact is a non-profit full-service adoption agency; our mission is to serve adopted children of color for a lifetime. Our goal is for every child to feel wanted, honored, and loved, a cherished member of a strong family with proud connections to the rich cultural heritage that is his or her birthright.

Adoption is a lifelong pact.
A birth parent and her newborn baby Pact helps expectant parents (or parents who have already given birth) to find adoptive families who want to adopt their African American, Latino, Asian, or multiracial children that are born anywhere in the United States. Pact recruits adoptive families looking to adopt and who want to adopt children of color as their first choice.

Pact embraces expectant parents facing an unplanned pregnancy and at a major turning point in their lives. Some women and men contact us directly. Others come through referrals from adoption agencies or private adoption professionals. We work with expectant parents from all states. We are a full-service adoption agency licensed by the State of California.

All of our adoption services are free to expectant parents.

Population(s) Served
Infants and toddlers
Ethnic and racial groups

We at Pact know how hard it can be to find a therapist who really “gets” the intersections of adoption, race, and parenting—a critical need for many families with adopted children of color. That’s why in 2021 we launched our new Center for Race & Adoption Focused Therapy (CRAFT), to provide adopted youth of color and their families with access to high-quality therapy services. The response has been immediate and astonishing:
• We launched CRAFT with a roster of three therapists in October 2021
• By the end of our first year, we have served over 30 clients
• We have hired a fourth therapist and are seeking another (male)
• About half of our clients live in the Bay Area
• The other half live in other regions of California and are seen remotely
The focus of the program is currently on serving youth up to 25 years old. CRAFT clinicians are a carefully selected, diverse team of licensed therapists of color, all with professional and/or personal experience with adoption/foster care.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Number of clients who self-report increased skills/knowledge after educational program/intervention

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents, Preteens, People of African descent, People of Central American descent, People of East Asian descent

Related Program

Teen & Tween Club

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Participation in Pact youth clubs leads to recognizable positive change: 87% of parents report that Pact mentors have had high impact on their children; 65% of you are able to advocate for themselves.

Number of participants that follow counseling recommendations

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People of African descent, People of Asian descent, People of Latin American descent, Families, Non-adult children

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Center for Race and Adoption Focused Therapy (CRAFT): Therapists have been a good fit and helped to mitigate some of the mental health challenges youth and families are facing.

Number of clients served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Ethnic and racial groups, Families, At-risk youth, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Pact Family Camp

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We served 202 families including 289 BIPOC adopted and fostered youth ages 3 to 18. Families reported life changing learning, 22% of the families received financial support to attend.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Pact is a non-profit organization whose mission is to serve adopted children of color. In every case, the child is always our primary client. In order to best serve children's needs, we provide not only adoptive placement, but lifelong education, support, and community for adoptees and their families on matters of adoption and race.

Pact's strategic plan includes the goals and actions to better serve underserved constituencies, promote equity in adoption, and expand access to Pact’s ethical, child-centered, race-conscious, honesty-based service approach.

Strategic initiatives:
—National Reach through Pact Communities
—Become an Licensed Placement Agency
—Create Adoptive Parents of Color Collaborative
—National Reach through Pact Family Camp Expansion
—National Reach through Digital Education & Interactive Web Engagement

· National Reach through Pact Communities—Our newest initiative focuses on supporting grassroots groups throughout the country who wish to create community for adopted children of color and their families, and incorporate Pact’s approach to adoption, race and family into programs that support youth and educate adults. Local organizers will join in a collaborative partnership with Pact and be offered content frameworks and seed money to start or grow their communities. Target initiative will include 5-7 locations engaged in 2019.
· National Reach through Interactive Web Engagement—This complex and ongoing technology upgrade project will also allow Pact to expand our national reach. The creation of a sophisticated new database is underway, one that will capture the diverse ways in which individuals and families engage with Pact. This will provide the foundation for a new website with more interactive and responsive engagement options. Target completion date is 2020.

Pact has a long track record of being a thought leader in the field of adoption, particularly as it intersects with race. Our accomplishments include:
Strategic initiatives:
—Become an Licensed Placement Agency: We have been licensed in the state of California for one year and have launched an ethical options counseling campaign called Adoption: It's Complicated!
—Create Adoptive Parents of Color Collaborative: We have offered 3 Annual Conferences, are currently launching a social media campaign including Instagram (YesWeDoAdopt), a Blog www.adoptiveparentsofcolor.org and Podcast designed to increase the visibility and voice of adoptive parents of color.
—National Reach through Pact Family Camp Expansion: Now Serving more than 200 families yearly at our two Camp locations (almost double from our previous single site Camp, include 35% parents of color and 45% new families.
—National Reach through Digital Education: Doubled attendance from 2017 to 2018.

For 2019, Pact continued to focus on four areas of equity it considered important:
• Expanding first/birth parent presence at camp: we recruited new attendees and speakers and made a special effort to include fathers. We are proud to say at Camp East, we will welcome 5 first parents as well as one birth sibling and include a birth father in the programing for the first time.
• Ensuring supportive learning spaces for both white transracial adopters and POC-headed families at camp: Pact Family Camp is for adopted children of color and their families; some of those are transracial adoptive families and some are not. We are committed to meeting the needs of both—with a clear understanding that parents of color have been traditionally under-served in the adoption community. We accomplished our goal of at least 30% of attending families being POC-headed at both Camps, this is the first year we have attained this goal at Camp
East!
• Ensuring that Pact Camp is open to families from diverse socio-economic groups
• Ensuring that we bring new children and their families to camp yearly: So many families have told us that their first visit to Pact Camp was transformative—the catalyst for life-altering changes in their perspectives, their priorities, their relationships. It is essential that we reach children and families who deserve and

· 2018: Become an Agency—Pact pursued becoming a licensed adoption agency as part of its commitment to making adoption in America more ethical and less racist. Ethical, anti-racist adoption practices include seeking out and supporting adoptive parents who reflect the racial identity of children being adopted—adoptive and foster parents of color who have been historically neglected and under-served.
· 2018: Adoptive Parents of Color Collaborative—Pact is working to uplift the voices, values, and experiences of adoptive parents of color who are traditionally underserved in adoption by offering a yearly conference, Yes! We Do Adopt digital experience and podcasts and a speakers bureau.
· 2017: National Reach through Camp Expansion—Building on the tremendous success of and high demand for our annual Pact Family Camp in California, a second camp was launched on the East Coast, making the transformative Pact Camp experience accessible to more children and families.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback

Financials

PACT AN ADOPTION ALLIANCE
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

PACT AN ADOPTION ALLIANCE

Board of directors
as of 02/10/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Ms. Christina Feliciana

UC Berkeley

Term: 2022 - 2024

Winslow Holmes

Macy's Corp.

Francois Choquette

Aon, Inc.

Marcia Bedford

Julia Morgan School for Girls

Alan Gellman

Credible

Michael Thompson

Chabot College Professor

Jeff Wilk

Tencue Productions

Nisha Grayson

Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor

Christina Feliciana

Licensed Clinical Social Worker

Jackson Plut

Student

Delrisha White

DEI Specialist

Malaika Parker

Non-Profit ED

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 10/3/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 10/03/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.