Menlo College

Atherton, CA   |  www.menlo.edu

Mission

At Menlo College, we ignite potential and educate students to make meaningful contributions in the innovation economy.

Ruling year info

1994

President

Steven Alan Weiner

Main address

1000 El Camino Real

Atherton, CA 94027 USA

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EIN

94-3204136

NTEE code info

Higher Education Institutions (B40)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Undergraduate business programs need to respond effectively to 21st century challenges.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Accounting Degree Program

Accountants track and analyze the financial performance of organizations and provide managers with crucial information for decision making. Recent economic and financial crises reinforce the importance of trustworthy, fairly presented accounting information. Menlo College’s Accounting degree is designed to prepare a student for a career in accounting. Students study all of the main areas of financial and managerial accounting in order to have a thorough overview of the field, which is complemented by a practical internship experience.

Accounting majors complete the core curriculum in business (39 units) that is taken by all business students. The core curriculum insures that all business majors have a solid understanding of the totality of the business enterprise. The accounting degree then consists of upper division courses in financial accounting, cost accounting, taxation, accounting information systems and auditing that total 30 units. The accounting major can be completed in four years of study.

The Accounting curriculum enables graduating accounting majors to understand standard concepts and topics in accounting as well as demonstrate written and oral communication in the field of accounting. Learning outcomes for accounting majors include:

Students’ learning outcomes in financial accounting are accomplished in phases through the Intermediate and Advanced Accounting coursework. In ACC 301 (Intermediate Financial Accounting I) they will be able to identify, synthesize and interpret Generally Accepted Accounting Principles as embodied in the FASB codification and demonstrate knowledge in solving homework and exam problems. In ACC 302 (Intermediate Financial Accounting II) and ACC 410 (Advanced Accounting), students will be able to prepare standard financial statements, including the balance sheet, the income statement, and the cash flow statement. Student learning outcomes are measured by students successfully completing practice sets, homework sets, and exams in ACC302 and ACC410.
Students will be able to analyze cost data and make accompanying financial decisions as a result of successfully solving homework problems and exam problems, as well as analyzing cases in ACC 412 (Cost Accounting).
Students will be able to understand, analyze and apply the basic concepts of income tax accounting for individuals and various business entities as a result of completing practice sets and exams in ACC 321 (Tax Accounting: Individual) and ACC 322 (Tax Accounting: Business).
Students will understand the process of auditing and understand the ethical issues associated with conducting an audit and the actual preparation of financial statements. Based on their understanding of auditing and ethics the students will be able to analyze cases and recommend a course of action in ACC300 (Accounting Ethics) and ACC420 (Auditing).
These learning outcomes prepare the accounting graduate to work in a variety of accounting positions in corporate and public accounting, to pursue further graduate level accounting coursework, and to work towards becoming a Certified Public Accountant if desired.

For students interested in pursuing a career as a Certified Public Accountant (CPA), you are now required to obtain 150 credits of study in order to qualify for licensure as a CPA in California. The specific requirements as to the fields of study needed to obtain those 150 credits are quite complicated. Please review the requirements as prepared by the California State Board of Accountancy: Educational Requirements for CPA Licensure. In addition, accounting majors should have members of the accounting faculty designated as their advisors to help ensure that the state’s requirements are all appropriately met.

Population(s) Served

Silicon Valley is known as the cradle of innovation. Apple, Google, Facebook, Intel and eBay, among others, all got their start here. If your goal is to launch your own business and perhaps follow in the footsteps of the above companies, our Entrepreneurship degree may be for you. You may end up as the next Bill Gates, or happily run your own custom furniture business, brewery, or consulting firm, as some of our graduates do.

Entrepreneurship students complete the core curriculum in business (39 units) that is taken by all business students. The core curriculum insures that all business majors have a solid understanding of the totality of the business enterprise. The entrepreneurship degree in the management major then consists of upper division courses in entrepreneurship and opportunity assessment, entrepreneurial finance, social capitalism, and other similar topics including an internship, that total 30 units. The entrepreneurship degree concludes with a special version of the senior capstone in which an actual business is launched. The degree can be completed in four years of study.

In Entrepreneurship students learn about the challenges, issues and opportunities associated with launching a new business enterprise. A number of graduates go on to start their own businesses in a variety of fields. Specific learning outcomes for Entrepreneurship are:

Students can describe the basic issues and challenges associated with starting a new business as a result of taking MGT 363 – Entrepreneurship and Opportunity Assessment.
Students can describe alternative approaches to financing a new business as a result of taking FIN 442 – Entrepreneurial Finance.
Student can identify and develop new investment business opportunities as a result of meeting notable figures from Silicon venture capital and private equity companies, venture management firms and emerging businesses and hearing, first hand, how they employ their knowledge and experiences to evaluate and invest in new business opportunities in MGT401 – Senior Capstone “Launching the Venture.” Textbook material and current business articles support understanding of how successful business opportunities are identified and developed.
Students can effectively communicate and “sell” their identified business opportunities in both oral presentation and written form as a result of development of a written business plan and oral presentation that articulates and justifies the viability of the identified opportunity.
Students will learn the rigors of a “formal presentation” of their final business opportunities to a panel of Venture Capitalists, Private Equity Investors and Entrepreneurs in a “Shark Tank” type environment, appreciate the value of thorough preparation and rehearsal, and appreciate the value of teamwork and common goals.

Population(s) Served

The dynamic world of global finance presents challenging career opportunities to the qualified college graduate, including venture capital, corporate finance, banking, consulting or the financial markets. Students can focus on entrepreneurial finance, corporate finance, financial institutions, investments and real estate. The focused curriculum blends current trends in the real world and advancements in technology with financial theory and internship experiences.

Finance students complete the core curriculum in business (39 units) that is taken by all business students. The core curriculum insures that all business majors have a solid understanding of the totality of the business enterprise. The Finance major then consists of upper division courses in corporate finance and financial modeling, plus electives such as investments, international finance, financial institutions, entrepreneurial finance, and derivatives that total 30 units. The Finance program concludes with an internship. The program can be completed in four years of study.

The Finance major introduces students to relevant and significant financial theories, highlights their applicability in the real world, demonstrates how various types of financial markets and institutions operate, and familiarizes students with best practices in the financial world. Students are trained to develop practice-oriented quantitative skills requiring knowledge of Excel, familiarity with multiple sources of financial data, and presentation of quantitative data in an understandable format. Desired learning outcomes for finance major students are:

Students will be able to identify and collect relevant publicly- available information and conduct quantitative analysis of a company’s financial performance and valuation as a result of completing a group project in FIN 320 (Financial Management 1), cases in FIN 321 (Financial Management 2) and homework assignments and exams in FIN 320, FIN 321 and FIN 335 (Financial Modeling).
Students will be able to analyze financial decisions made by various firms in real life business environment and relate these decisions to theoretical concepts covered in the classroom as a result of case studies in FIN 321 (Financial Management 2) and in-class discussions in FIN 320 (Financial Management 1) and FIN 321.
Students will be familiar with different project and security valuation techniques, with procedures related to the selection of different types of capital, and can determine the appropriate cost of capital for projects as a result of completing homework assignments and exams in FIN 320 (Financial Management 1), FIN 321 (Financial Management 2), FIN 335 (Financial Modeling) and cases in FIN 321.
Students can analyze the historical performance of a portfolio of securities and estimate portfolio’s statistical properties as a result of group project in FIN 320 (Financial Management 1) and homework assignments and exams in FIN 335 (Financial Modeling).
An important component of finance major students’ education at Menlo College is an internship experience with a firm in the corporate or the financial services sector. The internship program enables students to apply their knowledge obtained in the classroom to real-life situations and discover the implications of financial decisions in the real world.

Population(s) Served

If you like working with people and have a penchant for detail, the Human Resource Management Degree Program may be right for you. HR managers are responsible for the hiring, training, development, and compensation of an organization’s employees. They are often involved in strategic planning since, in today’s knowledge based economy, people are typically an organization’s most valuable resource. Courses in the program include benefits and compensation, staffing, training, development, employment law and HRM strategy.

Human Resource Management students complete the core curriculum in business (39 units) that is taken by all business students. The core curriculum insures that all business majors have a solid understanding of the totality of the business enterprise. The Human Resource Management program then consists of upper division courses in human resource management, employment law, HRM strategy, benefits and compensation, staffing, testing, and training. The Human Resource Management program includes a senior thesis and concludes with an internship. The program can be completed in four years of study.

In the HRM option students learn to become strategic partners in the management of people in organizations, and are prepared to assume entry level positions in human resource departments of a variety of organizations. Specific HRM learning outcomes are:

Students can describe the functions and roles of an effective HRM professional as a result of taking HRM 300 – Human Resource Management.
Students can perform activities associated with staffing, training, and compensation as a result of taking HRM 317 – Staffing/Testing/Training and Development and HRM 318 – Benefits and Compensation.
Students will have familiarity with labor laws and the historical background of labor/management relations in the United States and can apply labor law to specific situations through HRM 315 – Employment Law.
Students can develop a macro-level strategic workforce plan as a result of taking HRM 316 – Human Resource Management Strategy, which includes participation in an HRM Management Simulation. The HRM Management Simulation is a competitive simulation where students take on the role of Human Resource Director for a growing organization. It offers students valuable experience with decisions that affect compensation, turnover, productivity, diversity, morale, quality, accident rate, grievances, fringe benefits, absenteeism, and budget utilization.
Students will be able to conduct scholarly research through the completion of a one-year research thesis project. This project includes writing a literature review, designing a field study, analyzing data, discussing findings, and making recommendations. Students accomplish this through MGT 410: Empirical Research and MGT 411: Senior Thesis.

Population(s) Served

Globalization and the rise of the market economy are the two most fundamental and radical shifts in the world today. This program deepens a student’s understanding of the roots of international trade and commerce, the new challenges and opportunities associated with the emerging global economy and the trends and conditions of international markets and international finance. A working knowledge of a foreign language complements courses focused on multinational business operations.

International Management students complete the core curriculum in business (39 units) that is taken by all business students. The core curriculum insures that all business majors have a solid understanding of the totality of the business enterprise. The International Management program then consists of upper division courses in international economics, international finance, international marketing management and international law. The International Management program concludes with an internship which may be in another country. The program can be completed in four years of study.

In International Management students come to understand the challenges associated with working in businesses that operate in multiple countries and are capable of working in a wide variety of organizations with international operations. Specific learning outcomes are:

Students can describe the basic characteristics and issues associated with conducting business internationally as a result of taking IMG 300 – International Management.
Students can describe the basics of the international economic and financial environment as a result of taking IMG 301 – International Economics and/or FIN 438 – International Finance.
Students can effectively manage diversity including managing cultural differences and bridging institutional differences as a result of conducting an in-depth cultural analysis of a country as part of a paper that they are required to submit in IMG 300 – International Management and coverage of cases in the same course.
Students can manage the individual and organizational capabilities necessary for firms to thrive in an economic landscape that is volatile and complex as a result of analyses of various cases in IMG 300 – International Management that highlight the individual and the organizational capabilities necessary for succeeding internationally.

Population(s) Served

Marketers broadly help the organization focus on the “4 Ps” — Product, Price, Place and Promotion. They help identify and design needed products and services, determine appropriate pricing strategies, figure out how to deliver those products or services though appropriate distribution channels and determine how to make customers aware of, and interested in, those products and services. Career possibilities include sales, product development, product management, advertising and marketing research, among others. Individuals with a strong marketing background are well equipped to become entrepreneurs and develop their own businesses.

Marketing students complete the core curriculum in business (39 units) that is taken by all business students. The core curriculum insures that all business majors have a solid understanding of the totality of the business enterprise. The marketing major then consists of upper division courses in marketing strategy, market research, consumer behavior, internet marketing, plus electives to total 30 units. An internship is required of all marketing majors. The degree can be completed in four years of study.

Marketers broadly help the organization focus on the 4 P’s — Product, Price, Place and Promotion. They help identify and design needed products, determine appropriate pricing strategies, figure out how to deliver those products though appropriate distribution channels including the internet, and determine how to make customers aware of and interested in those goods and services.

In the Marketing major:

Students will be able to conduct primary and secondary research to identify potential markets, the needs/wants of consumers, and appropriate market segmentation as a result of taking MKT 335 – Marketing Research and completing the research project therein.
Students will be able to describe consumers for a given set of products or services and understand why consumers behave the way they do in regard to their buying decisions as a result of taking MKT 436 – Consumer Behavior.
Students will understand digital marketing strategies available on the Internet in the context of the traditional elements of product, price, place and promotion. Students will be able to create a digital marketing plan for a product or service as a result of taking MKT 437 – Internet Marketing.
Students will be able to analyze a complex market-based problem, identify potential solutions, recommend a strategy and defend it as a result of preparing case studies in MKT 409 – Strategic Marketing.

Population(s) Served

How do we think? Why do we behave in certain ways – why do we fidget, blush or lie? How does the brain affect our attraction to others, our choice of music or our political leanings? Psychology, the study of the human mind, explores these mysteries to help us better understand ourselves.

At Menlo, we provide a strong foundation for an undergraduate psychology degree through a general psychology curriculum while exploring the most current psychology issues, from sports psychology to human sexuality. Psychology can prepare you for a multitude of career paths, including graduate school, law school, teaching, coaching, human services work or business. Whatever you choose, when you leave Menlo, you’ll be ready.

The Psychology degree includes a common core of classes that every psychology student takes. APA recommends five major areas of learning goals and outcomes to insure that all psychology majors have the general knowledge and skills expected of a typical undergraduate psychology major.

1 – Knowledge base in psychology:

Conceptually this goal means that students have a reasonable breadth and depth of “key concepts, principles and overarching themes in psychology” (APA, 2013, pg. 15). Operationally, students will complete a comprehensive assessment of the core competencies of the curriculum: psychological disorders, lifespan development, biopsychology, and personality theory.

2 – Scientific inquiry & critical thinking:

Conceptually this goal means that students can ”use scientific reasoning to interpret psychological phenomena” (APA, 2013, pg. 20). Operationally, students design and conduct the Senior Thesis project demonstrating psychological information literacy and standards of research design, critique and analysis.

3 – Ethical & social responsibility in a diverse world:

Conceptually this goal means that students can “apply ethical standards to evaluate psychological science and practice” (APA, 2013, pg. 26) in a diverse global community. Operationally, students demonstrate attention to psychosocial issues of diverse populations and ethical practices for research and human services throughout the curriculum, culminating in their critiques of a body of literature in the Senior Thesis.

4 – Communication:

Conceptually this goal means that students “demonstrate effective written…and presentation skills” (APA, 2013, pg. 30). Operationally, students demonstrate written and oral communications skills by conducting and writing an analytical literature review of a key social-psychological issue and orally presenting their findings to a public audience in the Senior Thesis capstone.

5 – Professional development:

Conceptually this goal means that students “develop meaningful professional direction for life after graduation” (APA, 2013, pg. 16) that applies “psychological content and skills to their career goals.” Operationally, evidence from the prior Program Review (17. 2010-2011) demonstrates career planning and professional direction in two courses, PSY101 and PSY401. Over the last decade (2005-2014) at least 30% of all Senior Thesis projects have been directly related to students’ first careers or graduate school matriculation. Students have also completed elective internships in their field of interest.

If the Psychology program moves to include the mandatory internship requirement, career planning and professional direction are components of the proposed curriculum. Specific student learning outcomes will be developed for psychology internships rather than applying those listed earlier in this document for business internships.

Population(s) Served

Real estate is a significant element in the California and U.S. economies. The recent economic recession is intimately connected with the bursting of the real estate bubble. Land use is an on-going issue in California; in the Bay Area, land is a finite commodity with many competing claims for its use. Thus, real estate represents an area of business that will continue to be a major component of the California economy. Graduates with a background in real estate may work as brokers, property managers, developers, in government or even go into real estate law following graduate school.

Real Estate students complete the core curriculum in business (39 units) that is taken by all business students. The core curriculum insures that all business majors have a solid understanding of the totality of the business enterprise. The Real Estate option then consists of upper division courses in real estate law, real estate finance, urban economics and electives to total 30 units. An internship is required of all Real Estate majors. The program can be completed in four years of study.

In Real Estate students learn about the real estate industry and are capable of working in real estate sales, development, and property management. Students complete all but one of the required courses for a California real estate salesperson license. Specific learning outcomes are:

Students can describe the basic characteristics of the real estate industry including listing of properties, valuation, sales transactions and financing options as a result of taking MGT 233- Introduction to Real Estate.
Students understand the financial and economic environment of the real estate industry as a result of taking FIN 433 – Intermediate Real Estate Finance and ECO 316 – Urban Real Estate Economics.
Students understand the elements of real estate law, zoning law, and real property taxation as a result of taking Law 316 – Real Estate Law.
Students can apply academic knowledge to the local real estate market to propose real property transactions with positive financial and social outcomes.

Population(s) Served

Professional sports organizations are big business today. Behind the winning records and famous names are many other employees and activities. The Sports Management degree exposes students to all facets of the business of sports, including sports sponsorship relationships, team and league equity issues, labor and personnel management, and a wide variety of ethical and social issues facing business professionals in both professional and amateur athletics. The degree prepares students for internal positions in sports organizations, public marketing, radio and television programming and events management. An internship in a sports organization blends theory with practice.

Sports management students complete the core curriculum in business (39 units) that is taken by all business students. The core curriculum insures that all business majors have a solid understanding of the totality of the business enterprise. The Sports Management degree program then consists of upper division courses in sports organizations, sports ethics, sports marketing, the economics of sports and the history of sports. An internship is the culmination of the program. The program can be completed in four years of study.

In Sports Management students come to understand the sports industry and are capable of functioning in an entry level position in a sports organization such as a professional or college/university sports team, a fitness center, or a recreation center. Specific learning outcomes are:

Students can describe the basic characteristics of the sports industry including type of businesses and number and type of consumers served as a result of taking SMG 300 – Sports Organization and Business.
Students understand the economic and financial environment of the sports industry as a result of taking SMG 412 – Economics of Sports.
Students can develop promotional materials, engage in sales, and manage facilities and events in the sports industry as a result of taking the required course SMG 402 – Advertising and Marketing in Sports in which teams create a Situation Analysis, SWOT Analysis, determine Marketing Objectives and Marketing Strategies and Tactics, and then develop a final Marketing Plan, including a Strategic Plan Overview/Executive Summary.
Students can identify and make ethical decisions associated with various social and ethical concerns associated with sports as a result of class debates on topics such as whether or not: college athletes should be paid, hunting should be banned, or drug testing should be applied to all college and professional athletes. Students engage in these issues in both SMG 303 – History of Sports and SMG 401 – Legal and Social Issues in Sports Management.
Students develop an understanding of cultural and social issues in sports by examining historical perspectives and writing a historical research report in SMG 303 – History of Sports.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Menlo College’s vision is to redefine undergraduate business education to be dynamically adaptive, innovative, and relevant so that students can recognize opportunities and apply 21st century skills to make a positive impact on the world.

Representing the core values that inform our mission statement, at Menlo College, we:
• Value diverse ideas and celebrate our differences
• Treat all people with fairness and equity
• Develop the full potential in each person
• Support a range of teaching and learning styles
• Continually improve the educational process
• Consider one’s responsibilities to others
• Act with integrity

Our students thrive in an environment that values: small class sizes, experiential learning, engaged and student-centered faculty, holistic advising, exceptional student success resources, robust athletics programs and student leadership activities, and opportunities to engage in the Silicon Valley environment.

Our graduates are able to learn throughout their lives, and to think analytically, creatively, and responsibly in order to drive positive change in organizations and communities. Our faculty members mentor students by identifying potential, cultivating students’ individual talents, and helping them build a roadmap to support their success. We support our faculty in producing research that informs teaching, theory development, and professional practice.

We are transforming the classroom experience - bridging business theory and practice by stronger integration of course design and teaching methods. We are continuously developing our internship program – providing unique opportunities for our students to experience innovation in action together with business integration with premier businesses. We are also actively listening and learning from Silicon Valley’s shortcomings and positioning to be a thought leader for continuous business model changes. Finally, we are embracing the diversity of our student body – developing the skills of our students to work effectively with others with very different values, experiences and expertise.

Financials

Menlo College
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Menlo College

Board of directors
as of 02/11/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Geir Ramleth

PIX Systems

Term: 2014 - 2018

Tom Byers

Stanford University

Alma Clayton-Pedersen

Emeritus Consulting Group

Andrea Cunningham

SeriesC

Howard Dallmar

Newmark Cornish & Carey,

James A. Davlin

General Motors (Retired)

Tyler Edelstein Tuttle

Ocean Endowment Partners

Chris Garret

Devil’s Canyon Brewing Company

J. Michael Gullard

Cornerstone Management

David C. Irmer

Innisfree Companies

Micah Kāne

Hawai‘i Community Foundation

Jordan Long

Software, LLC.

Larry Lopez

Australian Venture Consultants (AVC

Thor Geir Ramleth

GeirHeads, LLC

Laurie Shaw

Citrix

Benjamin Ben Wagner

Dunn & Crutcher LLP

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes