GOLD2023

GOOD TIDINGS FOUNDATION

Driven by Dreams

aka Good Tidings Foundation, Good Tidings, GTF, GT   |   Burlingame, CA   |  www.goodtidings.org

Mission

Good Tidings Foundation looks to equally support the growth of marginalized youth in Northern California and beyond by creating environments for Athletics, the Arts, Education, and Wonder. We engage in charitable partnerships with professional sports teams, pro athletes, musicians, artists and other leaders who share our vision on how to create projects within our mission. We believe that every child deserves to have the means to achieve their dreams regardless of financial status, ethnic origin, religion or region of living. It is the Spirit of the Holiday Season, which we were founded upon, with the joy of giving in its simplest form that we look to emulate all year long. Our ‘mission over money’ philosophy is the foundation for everything we do.

Ruling year info

1995

Principal Officer

Mr. Larry Harper

Main address

1469 Rollins Road

Burlingame, CA 94010 USA

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EIN

94-3219013

NTEE code info

Physical Fitness/Community Recreational Facilities (N30)

Arts Education/Schools (A25)

Youth Development Programs (O50)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Art

Good Tidings builds two LeRoy Neiman Art Studios for Youth each year at a school, rec center, Boys and Girls Club, etc.. that is dedicated to serving low-income youths. Art has a unique ability to impact children. It allows children to express themselves without a right or wrong way. Unlike other activities like music or athletics, which require special equipment or skill, art does not discriminate against those with fewer resources. For underserved youth or those speaking English as a second language, art is an even more important medium through which they can communicate their feelings.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Economically disadvantaged people

Good Tidings supports education by providing education grants to high school seniors in need who have dedicated themselves to extraordinary community service projects. Since its inception, we have granted $1,616,000 to over 350 deserving high school seniors. In 1999, the Good Tidings Foundation Community Service Scholarship program started small, with five recipients receiving $1,000 each. Today, our program awards $100,000 annually to 10 underserved high school seniors at $10,000 each, providing much needed support to youth who have demonstrated tremendous leadership potential despite their own economic circumstances.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
Economically disadvantaged people

Good Tidings Foundation partners exclusively with the San Francisco Giants, Golden State Warriors, San Jose Sharks, Oakland Athletics, Sacramento Kings, San Francisco 49ers, NY Yankee CC Sabathia, Olympic Gold Medalist Kerri Walsh and other professional athletes to build or refurbish facilities that benefit underserved communities. To date, we have completed 204 projects.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Economically disadvantaged people

Good Tidings Foundation began back in 1995 as a holiday toy giveaway charity in our Founder's garage. Although we've evolved and have gone on to serve thousands of underserved youth in our key areas of Arts, Education, Athletics and Wonder, we have continued to donate thousands of toys to children each year during the holidays. Good Tidings has gifted over 55,000 toys in the past 20 years. Every holiday, we run a 10-day Winter Wonderland Program where we invite low-income youths and families to our warehouse to pick out toys for the holidays.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Economically disadvantaged people

Where we work

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

We set a goal each year to complete at least 6 athletic facilities and 2 art studios, to award $100,000 in scholarships to high school seniors, and to donate thousands of toys during the holidays. We strive to increase the number of children served by 10% each year, with nearly 40,000 children served annually to date.

We are a leanly staffed organization, so one of our key strategies is to maximize our limited resources so that we can create impact while keeping costs low. One way we are able to implement this strategy is to take advantage of the many partnerships that we have built over the last two decades. For our Art Program, we partner with the LeRoy Neiman Foundation who helps fund the construction of our Art Studios. For our Athletics Program, we partner with the Bay Area professional teams and athletes including the Giants, A's, Warriors, Kings, Sharks, 49ers, Kerri Walsh Jennings, Klay Thompson, and CC Sabathia who help provide funding for the construction of our
athletics facilities. We also have long-standing partnerships with various construction firms and contractors who are respective experts in their fields. They provide the finest, professional quality services for our facilities. We also partner with local government agencies and politicians, including the Oakland Parks and Rec Department, Friends of Oakland Parks & Rec, and Willie Brown. Our partnerships with professional sports teams and contractors are exclusive, giving us restrictive access to funds and resources – human, material and financial – that no other organization can access.

We have been in existence for over twenty years and have successfully completed over 223 projects for low-income children to date. Over this twenty-year period, we have continually adapted our programs to maximize efficiency and effectiveness. Good Tidings Founder Larry Harper has over 20 years of project management experience under his belt. He has worked with dozens of schools and government agencies, professional sports teams and athletes, corporate partners, and thousands of underserved youth. Larry has long-term relationships with these various entities and uses these relationships to maximize our program results.

Since our founding in 1995, we have completed over 223 projects for underserved youth, including 15 (and counting) art studios and over 180 (and counting) athletics facilities. We have awarded over $1.9 in scholarships to low-income high school seniors and have donated over 70,000 toys to underserved children during the holidays. In 2020, we added a new grant program called GT Ventures. With this program we have been able to award 2 young Black entreprenuers with a one-time cash grant of $10,000 each.

As we move forward, we will continue to operate our four key programs while looking for new opportunities to provide enriching experiences for underserved youth.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.)

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

Financials

GOOD TIDINGS FOUNDATION
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

GOOD TIDINGS FOUNDATION

Board of directors
as of 02/15/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Matthew King

King Insurance

Matthew King

King Insurance

Larry Harper

Good Tidings Foundation

Jamie Greene

No Affiliation

Drew Hagen

InVision Communications

Aaron Barulich

BiRite Foodservice Distributors

Rich Sarris

PAC Construction

Jerri Kay-Phillips

Hanson Bridgett

John McNulty

MBH Architects

Glenn DeKraker

CoreMedia Systems

Ali Hinga-Nevitt

Driscoll's

Dave Flemming

San Francisco Giants

Rick Lyons

Board Director

Kim Popovits

Genomic Health

Rachel Nghe

Dropbox

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 2/15/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 02/15/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.