Natural Resources Council, Inc.

Protecting the Nature of Maine since 1959

aka Natural Resources Council of Maine (NRCM)   |   Augusta, ME   |  http://www.nrcm.org

Mission

Founded in 1959, the Natural Resources Council of Maine is a nonprofit membership organization working to protect, restore and conserve Maine's environment, now and for future generations.

Ruling year info

1963

Chief Executive Officer

Dr. Lisa Pohlmann PhD

Main address

3 Wade Street

Augusta, ME 04330 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

01-0270690

NTEE code info

Natural Resource Conservation and Protection (C30)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (C01)

Energy Resources Conservation and Development (C35)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The Natural Resources Council of Maine seeks to protect the nature of Maine, now and for future generations, by harnessing the power of science, the law, and the voices of people who value Maine's environment.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Protecting the Nature of Maine

The Natural Resources Council of Maine (NRCM) focuses on five issue areas vital to the health of Maine's environment and economy: 1. Addressing climate change through renewable energy, efficiency, and clean transportation; 2. Restoration of Maine’s rivers, lakes, streams and coastal waters; 3. Conservation of Maine’s forests and wildlife; 4. Promoting sustainability measures that reduce pollution and waste; and, 5. Federal policies that benefit Maine's environment.

NRCM is Maine’s leading environmental watchdog. We tackle the most pressing issues facing our environment, and proactively identify and address emerging issues critical to the well-being of Maine communities, our state's wildlife, and our nature-based economy. We use science, outreach, and citizen engagement to educate and engage our members, supporters, policy makers, businesses, and the public, and work to inspire people statewide and beyond to become better stewards of Maine’s natural resources and communities.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth

Where we work

Awards

Environmental Award 1985

Down East Maganize

Affiliations & memberships

National Wildlife Federation 1964

National Wildlife Federation Women in Conservation 2015

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of supporters

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Young adults

Related Program

Protecting the Nature of Maine

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Number of supporters represents a combination of our members, donors and activists.

Number of Facebook followers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Young adults

Related Program

Protecting the Nature of Maine

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We are keenly focused on building our social media networks. As of November 15, 2019 we have 15,750 Facebook "fans" as well as 3,200 followers on Twitter and 1,501 on Instagram.

Retention rate for dues-paying members

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Young adults

Related Program

Protecting the Nature of Maine

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

One way we measure success is by evaluating the percentage rate at which our members renew their membership.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Founded in 1959 by Maine people, the Natural Resources Council of Maine (NRCM) works to protect, restore and conserve Maine’s environment, now and for future generations.

NRCM educates and engages people with the most pressing environmental issues facing our state, and inspires them to become better stewards of Maine’s natural resources. We advance public policies and programs to expand renewable energy, energy efficiency, electric transportation, and bolster climate action. We work to decrease water pollution, restore free-flowing rivers, and improve native fish passage. We advocate for more public ownership of Maine lands, and support responsible land development and sustainable forest practices that protect sensitive ecosystems and Maine wildlife. We work with Maine communities to reduce plastic pollution, decrease waste, and increase recycling and composting. We also mobilize citizens to communicate with Maine’s Congressional leaders about federal policies that impact Maine’s environment, communities, and economy.

NRCM uses our staff expertise, communications, and partnerships to build support for the most effective environmental protections for Maine. We work closely with our elected officials to shape policy; we participate in agency-led reviews of rules and permit applications; and we advise legislators, state-appointed commissions and local bodies about the impact of changes to public policy.

We also work closely with our members and activists. Grassroots citizen engagement is the cornerstone of our work. Throughout our history, NRCM has seen that this is the most effective way to ensure we secure and maintain strong protections for Maine’s environment and people.

We communicate with our members, supporters, policy makers and the public using direct mail, our website, email, and a variety of social media sites. Our staff also research and make available fact sheets, testimony given before the Maine Legislature, comments we provide to state agencies, and special publications on key environmental issues.

NRCM has a full-time staff of 25 with expertise in science, policy, communications, and grassroots outreach. Our active Board of Directors adds to our capacity by offering expertise in such disciplines as education, medicine, the law, and conservation, and by helping create new and strategic partnerships. NRCM also has the largest, most passionate grassroots network in Maine, and represents over 25,000 members and supporters.

We foster partnerships with traditional and unexpected allies, including businesses; local, state and federal agencies; tribal leaders and faith-based groups; and other conservation groups. Over the years we have developed a reputation as a solutions-oriented organization that knows how to find common ground to help solve environmental problems.

NRCM is also fiscally strong and carefully manages our budget. We are supported solely through private funding that includes membership dues, individual donations, foundation grants, business sponsorships for public engagement events, national environmental non-profit partners, and in-kind support. We offer a variety of ways for people to contribute and diversify our revenues through our monthly giving program, Partners in Maine's Future, and our planned giving program, the Wintergreen Society.

NRCM partnered with Maine people to achieve victories such as: designation of the Allagash Wilderness Waterway; restoration of the Kennebec and Penobscot rivers; and, creation of the Land for Maine’s Future program that conserves land across all 16 Maine counties. We also led adoption of Maine’s recycling programs and helped the state adopt a billboard ban that keeps our roadways uncluttered and scenic.

Over the past several years we celebrated the completion of the Penobscot River Restoration Trust (NRCM was a founding member) that opened up 2,000 miles of river habitat, and designation of the Katahdin Woods and Waters National Monument which protects 87,500 acres of spectacular forests and waterways. NRCM led a five year effort that resulted in public support to conserve the area. NRCM also helped Maine adopt the strongest mining law in the U.S. It prohibits large-scale open-pit mining; mining on public lands and under high-value waterways or coastal wetlands; and requires companies to pay enough up front for any future mining disaster.

In 2021, NRCM led the grassroots campaign that secured Maine's place as the first U.S. state to adopt Extended Producer Responsibility for Packaging, a policy to require producers to fund the collection and recycling of excess packaging materials (e.g. plastic, steel, aluminum, glass, cardboard). More than 40 jurisdictions around the world have adopted such programs, including all European Union countries and most Canadian provinces. This success follows our 2019 campaign that resulted in Maine becoming the first state in the nation to ban polystyrene foam food containers and the fourth state to ban single-use plastic take-out bags. Plastic pollution is a global threat to the health of our oceans and wildlife, and NRCM sees reducing single-use plastics in Maine as one of our highest priorities.

NRCM is also leading climate and energy policy in Maine. In 2019, NRCM led a successful campaign that resulted in a landmark climate policy requiring Maine to reduce its carbon emissions 80% by 2050. Throughout 2020, NRCM dedicated substantial staff expertise to the Maine Climate Council (MCC) process that resulted in Maine’s first Climate Action Plan (CAP) in 15 years, Maine Won’t Wait. Now that the CAP is final, NRCM is mobilizing our advocacy, outreach, and communications resources toward implementing the plan.

Financials

Natural Resources Council, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
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  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Natural Resources Council, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 11/22/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Ms. Maria Gallace

Events & Charitable Giving Director, East Brown Cow Management, Inc.

Term: 2024 - 2017

Emily Beck

Retired Owner and Partner, Young Beck LLP

Michael Catania

Retired Conservation Executive

Sarah Cotton

Custom Program Coordinator & Course Advisor, Hurricane Island Outward Bound School

Seana Cullinan

Business Owner, Larkspur Design

Francesca Galluccio-Steele

Retired Educator

Marcia Harrington

Survey Research Director, Alarum Institute

Dennis King

CEO, Maine Behavioral Healthcare

Norton Lamb, Jr.

Retired Business Owner

William Meserve

Retired Partner, Ropes & Gray

Peter Millard

Medical Director, Seaport Community Health Center

Sadie Lloyd-Mudge

Business Owner, Bee Balm & Nettle

Kathryn Olmstead

Retired Associate Dean, University of Maine

Liz Rettenmaier

Senior Facilitator and Project Manager, The Council Oak

Sarah Short

Development Director, Mitchell Institute

Edward Simmons

Managing Director and Partner, Hightower Advisors

Stephanie Smith

Retired Nonprofit Manager

Annie Winchester

Retired Commercial Banker

Bonnie Wood

Professor Emerita, University of Maine at Presque Isle

Aaron Anker

Business Owner, Grandy Oats

Amy Scott

Program Manager, Northern Forest Center

Lucy Abbott

Retired, U.S. Foreign Service

Ben Whalen

Owner, Bumbleroot Organic Farm

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 11/22/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, or other sexual orientations in the LGBTQIA+ community

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data