Community Improvement, Capacity Building

Animals (and Humans) in Disaster, EMPTY BOWL PET FOOD PANTRY INC,

We help people in crisis!

aka Animals in Disasters (A.I.D.) ' America, R U Prepared, PatchesAZ, Cooperative Collabation Coalition   |   Phoenix, AZ   |  http://aimalsandhumansindisaster.org

Mission

Through community and their beloved pets, we help people in crisis. Though your philanthropy,we serve Arizona to help build resiliency through teamwork, communication and problem solving to help people in crisis to look forward, not back to what has been lost!

Notes from the nonprofit

We do not expend cash for a building. Our Work is IN the communities - especially the small and rural communities of Arizona

Ruling year info

2010

President, CEO

CJ Anderson

Vice President of Operations

Steve Rundquist

Main address

610 E Bell Rd Ste 2-271

Phoenix, AZ 85022 USA

Show more addresses

EIN

01-0975325

Cause area (NTEE code) info

Community, Neighborhood Development, Improvement (S20)

Philanthropy / Charity / Voluntarism Promotion (General) (T50)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (M01)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990-N.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Through pets and community, we help vulnerable populations in crisis to a new norm for sustainability and resiliency. We do this through Coalitions and Partnerships such as: United way Project Connect through Arizona Arizona Military Veterans Resource Network Arizona Veterans Stand Down Az Housing Coalition Hopefest Phoenix, Prescott, Tucson Maricopa Couty Vuleraable Need Population coalition Arizona 211 Vitalyst Health Community coalition Coyote Crisis, Phoenix Food Coalition Maricopa County Food Coalition Arizona State Food Coalition Arizona Coalition to end Domestic Vioolence Gov. Ducey's Arizona State Citizen Corp Council Arizona Statewide Independence Living Council Best Friends Animal Coalition

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Arizona Animal and Human Emergency Response, MRC

We provide assistance to single family home/apartment fires to community wide events, working alongside American Red Cross Grand Canyon Chapter with their function of care for the humans, while we care for the animals.. We are a FEMA disaster unit inside this 501c3, because we know that a government response for a community disaster is confined to the actual disaster event. The budget listed below comes from our 501c3 to support on going services where needed.   We unite the community by providing animal based events that benefit the community and allow agencies, groups and people to come together in these activities to build relationships and to gain experience in problem solving under stressful conditions. https://mrc.hhs.gov/MrcUnits/UnitDetails/2473 for further program information.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged, low-income, and poor people
Unemployed, underemployed, and dislocated people
Budget
$25,000

Between natural disasters, we keep in practice by partnering with other non-profit agencies to help keep pets in their homes during times when people are dealing with personal loss from the economy, sickness or other loss. Through community and pets we help people in crisis by providing meals, inkind donations such as: vet services, dog collars, beds, toys, jackets, etc. We also provide support for other species such as turtles, birds, guinea pigs, rabbits, etc. We have a 10 years history of providing meals and services to Arizona residents and their pets. Seniors, veterans, disabled, homeless, chronically ill and injured are all special need groups that we help during crisis to keep them looking forward to creating a sustainable new life instead of looking backwards to grief and loss. We partner with many coalitions, food banks, churches and other nonprofit agencies. Many people will help their pets but not themselves. Our services are available when people choose to help themselves through crisis for a sustainable lifestyle. People ask for help for their pets, but not for themselves. We coaxing them out of their home, when they come to get food for their pets. Once in the agency, they can get other forms that help stabilize the humans and really helps their pets long tern - AND helps build a community of hope,

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged, low-income, and poor people
General/Unspecified
Budget
$10,000

Please see www.patchesaz.org to join the county wide effort to keep pets in their home and work with Maricopa County in animal adoption. This program has 2 components. 1) a public and private partnership venture to establish a shared shelter facility in the Maricopa County metropolitan area for animal rescue organizations to temporarily house and hold adoption events at an affordable cost. This project will be the first of its kind. 2) Patches Az works with the special need people,~ one on one such as veterans, disabled, sick/injured, seniors etc to help them with their pets beyond basic help! Since2011, we have given pallets of the same kind of food and donated pet food and supplies/equipment to these rural and special rescues in Arizona, so that the animals they rescue receive the same kind of food to get through a crisis or medical food to help senior, handicapped, sick or inured animals.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged, low-income, and poor people
Unemployed, underemployed, and dislocated people
Budget
$1,200

Through Veteran's programs both government, non-profit, chuches and business, we aid with pets and service programs providing donated pet food, leashes, collars, bowls beds, toys kitty littler and other services.

Population(s) Served
Veterans
Families
Budget
$5,000

To assist the general public, especially those with special needs, to be able to effectively plan, prepare for and respond to the first, second and third phases of disasters. First: Evacuate or Stay/ Neighbor helping neighbor before the Emergency Response Agencies are mobilized or called to help communities. Second: The formal government response when we join through our State Animal Medical Response Corp out of State Health Department or County Citizen Corp . Third; is the Community Response after the government response is done but people are still displaced. We also help with making community s and individuals stronger and to have more resiliency for future events.

Population(s) Served
General/Unspecified
Budget
$5,000

This program has 2 components. 1) a public and private partnership venture to establish a shared shelter facility in the Phoenix metropolitan area for animal rescue organizations to temporarily house and hold adoption events at an affordable cost. This project will be the first of its kind. 2) Patches Az works with the special need people,~ one on one such as veterans, disabled, sick/injured, seniors etc to help them with their pets beyond basic help!

Population(s) Served
General/Unspecified
Budget
$5,000

We have been a part of community collaborations for over 5 years. Arizona Veterans Stand downs, United Way's of Arizona Project Connects, Hopefests in Prescott, Phoenix and Tucson and more - we found that they were always helped in the large cities of Arizona, not the rural communities around the state. Our goal is to cultivate cooperative collaboration among communities, break down silos through networking community events, and bridge the gaps in service and identify resource needs to promote resiliency and sustainability in the Communities of Arizona. We are driven by Relationship Building, Resource Sharing, Respectful Communication, Teamwork and Empowering Individual Action throughout the communities in Arizona.

Population(s) Served
General/Unspecified
Budget
$35,000

Where we work

Affiliations & memberships

FEMA Medical Response Corp #2473 2012

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

How many Meals for Cats/Dogs at Non-profit Agencies, Churches and Coalitions were served in Arizona.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Aging, elderly, senior citizens,Economically disadvantaged, low-income, and poor people,People with disabilities

Related Program

Empty Bowl Pet Food Pantry

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Dog meal 3.5 pounds of food Cat meal 1.0 pound of food

How many pounds of dog/cat food (including Veterinary Pet Food) to Animal Rescues/Shelters?

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Patches AZ, Rescue/Shelter Assistance

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Vaues include both wet and dry pet food.

How many dollars worth of pet items such as leashes, collars, bowls, beds, toys, jackets, etc give to disaster and domestic vioence victims and Veterans in Arizona?

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Arizona Animal and Human Emergency Response, MRC

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

For 2016 ,we decided to support all of Arizona Veterans and Disaster victims, the Arizona public wanted to do more. Petsmart also provided a grant that allowed us to give to all Az Veteran's pets.

How many types of animal emergency response activities did we respond to in Arizona?

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Arizona Animal and Human Emergency Response, MRC

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

emergency responses, strengthened public health, served a vulnerable population, supported non-emergency community events, developed/strengthened the MRC unit, improved community preparation

What was the number of hours and economic value we responded to animal emergency response situations in Arizona?

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Arizona Animal and Human Emergency Response, MRC

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Az Animal Emergency Response reported activities.

Charting impact

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

What is the organization aiming to accomplish?

To have neighbor helping neighbor through the magic of animals in these challenging times. To work to change the paradigm that disasters have to be natural and community-wide to a disaster is just as devastating to someone who loses a job,or home, or gets catastrophically sick/injured. To get people who wouldn't lift a finger for humans, but would for animals, to begin to open their heart through their love of animals -to the people that own them. So that a neighbor might then feed a cat, or walk a dog, to graduate to helping that neighbor go shopping for food, or to a doctors, To help people that are overcome by loss, to begin to heal from the love of an animal, because we found that people will ask for help for beloved pets, but NOT ask for help for themselves. so we partner with Coalitions like United Way's Project Connect, Arizona Veterans Stand Down, Hopefest in Prescott, Tucson and Phoenix (25,000 clients) and non-profits, churches and food banks so that when people leave their home to get food for their pets, they can go across the aisle to get help for the humans to get back on their feet, (and REALLY help the pets long term)! To help start-up, rural and small non-profit agencies become stronger, more knowledgeable in managing the special needs of a non-profit business, especially during disasters both in providing services and in surviving during difficult times. To help people, especially our children, discover their humaneness (the quality of compassion or consideration for others (people or animals) through the giving to others as they can.

When we move into an area in Arizona, we are careful to NOT create dependencies or the illusion that we are there to take over. We seek to empower existing efforts and supplement gaps as we are able to, by our donations of cash and in-kind. We seek opportunities to add to existing services, rather than creating them ourselves, this is why our model of belonging to Coalitions like those mentioned, combined with our partnerships for longer-term support and care, goes beyond the pet' needs to their human owners and supports local community building and increase household stability. We serve all 15 counties in Arizona, directly. Through webinars and other tools, we provide service to other non-profits as well. There are 3 phases of our work: 1) Before a community-wide disasters, we are there building relationships, becoming part of their problem-solving. We participate in community events both giving service as well as establishing ourselves as a friend, not an outsider (which for hard-to-reach communities is a critical action). In this strategy, we aid individuals to gain stability through the needs of their pets. 2) When community disasters strike, we move into our role in FEMA activation our Animal Medical Response Team (MRC#2473) through the State Health Disaster Department and work with our Maricopa Citizens citizens to help to ensure the safety and health of the=ose special groups we serve. 3) After the official emergency responders have finished with a disaster event, they leave - but frequently, the community is still trying to recover, in shock because life isn't going to be the same again. This is where we put back on our non-profit status hat, remaining to help the community become stronger then it was before. We are seeing success. In five of the counties we have been helping, Pima, Cochise, Yuma, Coconino and Mohave, new coalitions have formed this year that we continue to aid.

Unlimited. We work in communities, rather than ask them to come to us. Therefore, we do NOT have an administrative office building expenses. Our ability to create relationships means that over ten years, $3,353,752 of In-kind Pet Food/Items and donated cash for all ​services that have been provided in the 15 Counties in Arizona since 2010. Cash donations make the difference for how MUCH service we can give, not the giving of service. During the Coronavirus in February 2020, we looked ahead to see that we would not get the usual donations from the assortment of Community activities we would do around the state from March to (at least) July. We also forecast the supply chain would beak down from either transportation lack or from people getting sick within our manufactures. We were ready - thanks to your donations, to hit the ground running March 1. March 10 the shutdowns started. We served 8 food banks across the Valley of the Sun, Maricopa county, including one food bank that served chronically-terminally ill/injured patients and one that served service dog teams, we added another project of service members of those teams who were over 60, mobility challenged, medically frail and live alone, 60 emergency human food boxes a month. St Marys Foodbank released a survey that food banks are at 600% capacity during this time. This is like a hurricane disaster response. For the first time, all 50 states are listed in the national disaster proclamation. There is nowhere to run, help is not going to arrive from the next county - or state. Starting in May, people emerge from their homes blink in the sun. of the eye of the storm. over the summer, they will begin to put together their lives or build new ones. Then, in the fall - around October/November, the other side of the eye will hit. There will be a second wave. They will discover how frail their life is as systems collapse much faster. The vulnerable populations we serve, will find it much harder to recover between the dark of winter and the holidays that will not be festive.

> As areas learn how to do want we are doing and band together, to work together, our need to supply direct service grows less and we move into a support role. We learned during the CV 19 response, that plan B has to be individual donations again supported by community /block watch-type leaders. This is under development right now. > As communities grow more knowledgeable and skilled in how to respond to disaster, including all its stages -planning, mitigation, response recover and training, we look to see more cooperation in disasters of all levels -from the individual to community. Coconino County actually has been a role model for us, Yavapai county is very strong as well,allowing us to learn how to supplement what is needed in beneficial ways. (We gave supplies to their United Way for the Yarnell Fire that destroyed 1/4 of their community with no "Federal support for 6 months). In spite of the fact that in Mid-May, the last of our large distributors and ceased making donations to charities we are still working going door to door to get donation supplies to give oout and we have several pallets on hand for response to Arizona wildfires and floos this summer. We are seen as a friend rather than outsider, to hard-to-reach communities and are invited in for activities. This is already happened. Our goal is to empower small groups with our support to help in their local area.

We have: >stated to make progress with our non-profit "competitors" by aiding them and working with them for the good of the communities we serve, >our coalitions and partnerships continue to grow across the state, >our programs and their services continue to deepen and broaden in scope, >our community and business relationships expand along with the in-kind donations. > We have helped approximately 42 rescues across 'Arizona with pet food during crisis times. > We have been able to funnel veterinary food and high-grade food to seniors, disabled, ill and injured animals at rescues to allow those rescues to spend more money on medical support and safe more animals that would otherwise be euthanized as too expensive to work with. > We have given approximately 18,000 pounds a year of pet food to people who are severely ill or dying to help them keep their pets with them to the end > We have given approximate 20,000 pounds of high-grade food and treats to service dogs to help people with mobility challenges remain functional in this challenging time. What is still a challenge: >We are slowly building and conduct classes under our social enterprise program to create a stable and routine source of revenue to be able to pay for the few expenses we must to be able to do more of what we do so well. >In 2019, we started a separate department to help small, rural, and start-up non-profits through this tough time to provide more services to needy communities and clients. > Phoenix dog magazine has joined our agency as Pets and People magazine to bring together pet lover support all through Arizona in 2020

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is the organization collecting feedback?

    We regularly collect feedback through: paper surveys, community meetings/town halls, constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees.

  • How is the organization using feedback?

    We use feedback to: to identify and remedy poor client service experiences, to identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, to make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, to inform the development of new programs/projects, to strengthen relationships with the people we serve.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    We share feedback with: our staff, our board, our funders, our community partners.

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to: it is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, it is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection.

  • What significant change resulted from feedback

    The outcome of this feedback is that service is provided equally across diverse locations and gaps in needed or desired service. New programs are started as projects

Financials

Animals (and Humans) in Disaster, EMPTY BOWL PET FOOD PANTRY INC,
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Animals (and Humans) in Disaster, EMPTY BOWL PET FOOD PANTRY INC,

Board of directors
as of 5/14/2020
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

CJ Anderson

Animals In Disaster, Empty Bowl Pet Food Pantry

Term: 2010 -

Steve Rundquist

Vice President Board

Terry Stephens

Treasurer

Ed Checkley

Vice President Operations

Marilyn Wallace

Secretary

Eark Antell

Director Warehouse

Julie Carlson

Director Veteran Program

Karen Duran

Director Animal Disaster

Dave Waller

Director America RU Ready

Pam Checkley

Director Office

Michelle Waller

Chief Oerations Officer

Wayne Miller

Director - PATCHES AZ

Carol Farabee

Director Cooperative Collabrative Coalition

Sharon Keene

Director Avian Alliance

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 04/06/2020

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Gender identity
Female

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not Transgender (Cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 04/06/2020

Policies and practices developed in partnership with Equity in the Center, a project that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems within the social sector to increase racial equity. Learn more

Data
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.

Keywords

seniors, disabled, abused women, veterans, safety, health, crisis, disaster, pets, animals, collaboration, cooperative collaboration, Workforce coalition