Women for Afghan Women

Afghan Women Rising

aka WAW   |   Fresh Meadows, NY   |  www.womenforafghanwomen.org

Mission

MISSION
Women for Afghan Women (WAW) is dedicated to protecting and promoting the rights of disenfranchised Afghan women and girls in Afghanistan and the U.S. In particular, WAW works to help Afghan women and girls exercise their rights to pursue their individual potential to self-determination, and to representation in all areas of life—political, social, cultural, and economic. WAW relentlessly advocates for women's rights and challenges the norms that underpin gender-based violence wherever opportunities arise to influence attitudes and bring about change.

VISION
A world in which Afghan women and girls enjoy peace, justice, equality, and freedom to participate in all spheres of life and live without fear. A world in which all women and their families thrive and prosper.

Ruling year info

2002

Executive Director

Najia Nasim

Main address

158-24 73 Avenue

Fresh Meadows, NY 11366 USA

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EIN

02-0539734

NTEE code info

Women's Rights (R24)

Rape Victim Services (F42)

Family Violence Shelters and Services (P43)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Afghanistan remains one of the most dangerous countries in the world for women and girls. Due to armed conflict, harmful patriarchal traditions, and widespread violence and discrimination against women. With a resurgent Taliban, a faltering economy, and the lack of security threatens the sustained advancement of Afghan women. These issues are not only prevalent for Afghan women in Afghanistan but also in the immigrant community in NY. The Afghan community in NY consists of refugees or asylum seekers fleeing conflict and poverty in Afghanistan. With little to no access to education and employment in Afghanistan, most have few opportunities for advancement, forcing them to live in poverty and isolation. These challenges contribute to the perpetuation of harmful practices that disproportionally impact women who are at the risk of discrimination and violence. WAW provides life-saving advocacy, education, and social services to ensure that women’s and girls’ safety and rights are protected.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

12 Family Guidance Centers

The Family Guidance Center (FGC) is our flagship program. Our approach begins with an attempt to mediate, through small community meetings called "jirgas.”
Two fundamental principles explain our community-based program design: women do not have to jettison their culture or their religious beliefs in order to take charge of their lives; men as well as women, perpetrators of DV as well as victims, must receive counseling if headway against this social scourge is to be made.
Our FGCs have gained widespread support from government and legal institutions as well as communities and families. This widespread acceptance of our FGCs may be attributed to the fact that mediation for family and marital conflict is endorsed by Islam, and also because the WAW process targets men as well as women, thereby reducing traditional male resistance.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Families

In 2003, when WAW held a conference on women's rights in Kandahar, we visited the women's prisons in Kabul and Kandahar. It was then that we discovered that in Afghanistan, women are imprisoned along with their children, and that no school or other activities are provided for these children. Seeing the women incarcerated in Pul-e-Charki, a hellish medieval-like fortress on a vast, desert-like plain outside Kabul, Manizha vowed to do something about this. A board member went to check it out again in 2008, and was sickened by the conditions: the filth, the chaos, the state of the children. WAW went to work immediately to raise money to get the kids out of there.

WAW's CSC is a model of its kind in Afghanistan and would compare favorably with any similar facility in the world. There's an accelerated learning program to help the kids qualify for entrance into local schools, individual and group therapy, tutoring, computer and English classes, sports, entertainment, field trips. The children arrive angry, out of control, illiterate. Very soon they quiet down and throw themselves into their studies. No children in the world are more eager to learn than these kids. They are starving for education.

Over the years, WAW has been able to track that the children in its CSCs receive exceptional tutoring and one-on-one educational support. They, overall, do better than other Afghan children in school and are often at the top of their class.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Our Halfway House serves women coming out of prison and shelter.
Women coming out of prison often have no home and family to return to, or will be risking their lives if they return home. Most women in prison have committed no crime-- they are in prison because they're have ran away from abuse, are accused of adultery, or are taking the rap for a husband, boyfriend or brother.
Women in shelters often have the same problem. They have shamed the family and must be punished. Women alone often end up walking the streets or turning to prostitution. Many end up dead. There is no solid evidence about this population because they aren't worth worrying about enough to collect data. They are simply erased.
But WAW worries about them and also about their children if they have them. What will happen to the children, now thriving in our Children's Support Centers and attending school if they have to return to a village in the middle of nowhere, without a school to attend, and to extended family who will torture if not kill them and their mothers. These women will enter WAW's Halfway Houses, the only facilities of their kind for women at risk in Afghanistan. There they will learn a vocation, how to read and write, how to manage money and other life skills. In other words, we will help them prepare for their independent futures. We will find them jobs and a place to live when they're ready to move out of these safe places and into the world.
This important project rounds out the mission of our Family Guidance Centers, our shelters, our Children's Support Centers: to preserve and protect human rights for Afghan women.

Population(s) Served
Women and girls

WAW NY is a home away from home for Afghan women. It is a safe space for the women from this community, where their needs are the priority. Most women who frequent the Center live in Queens, although Afghan women from Long Island and other NYC boroughs also participate in our programs. The programs we offer are designed to respond to the needs and challenges of Afghan women living in New York, and to protect their rights.

We provide:
● Confidential case management and onsite legal support for individuals and families dealing with domestic violence, immigration, public benefits, education, employment, interpretation, and any other needs that may arise;
● Adult empowerment classes for women that include daily ESL classes, citizenship classes, driving test preparation, empowerment trainings, and workshops (such as self-defense, financial literacy, and computer programming), and a new citizenship class for men;
● Women’s Circle, a monthly support group program that provides a safe and confidential space for discussions on topics that are timely and relevant, but often taboo, in the community, including domestic violence and women’s rights;
● Girls Leadership and Boys Leadership Programs, empowerment programs for girls and boys aged 10 to 15 that offers life skills training and educates them about leadership, human rights, and career choices;
● Homework Help that provides students of all genders from first to twelfth grades with support on homework and preparing for state testing; and
● Community and Cultural Events that help preserve and celebrate the richness of Afghan culture and traditions with the wider NY community, and serve as an outreach opportunity to reach out to new clients, inform them of WAW’s services, and learn about emerging and current needs of the communities we serve.

Population(s) Served
Women and girls
Families

Our Women’s Protection Centers offer women and girls safe and confidential homes until their legal cases around gender-based violence are resolved.

Within the Women's Protection Centers, WAW provides life-saving, life-changing services:

- Services for survivors of violence and rape;
- Intensive emergency and safety counseling;
- Rescue, transportation, and shelter;
- Safe reintegration into the community; and 
- Literacy and employment classes.

Some actual cases of this work include (names changed to protect confidentiality):
• Miriam was little over 3-years old when she was raped. She was referred to Women for Afghan Women after her case received intense media attention. WAW took the child to the French Medical Institute for Children (FMIC, also known as the Mother and Child Hospital) in Kabul, where the hospital was able to stem the post-rape bleeding but refused to do any further treatment. However, WAW persisted and negotiated with FMIC until it agreed to conduct the surgery Miriam required. She was finally admitted and hospitalized for 10 days.
• Gita is a 30-year old client, who was the victim of extreme violence and abuse by her husband and her in-laws. She was 8-months pregnant when her husband, sisters-in-law, and mother-in-law beat her until the point that she miscarried. Even after her full-term miscarriage, her in-laws did not take her to the hospital. She lost over half of her blood before she was finally referred to a hospital in Kunduz. The hospital felt her case required medical attention that they could not provide and asked that she be referred to Kabul for treatment. WAW was contacted and admitted Gita to a hospital in Kabul. WAW paid for her blood transfusions, but Gita required even more blood transfusions to survive. WAW’s Kabul Family Guidance Center staff donated their own blood to make up for the shortfall. She soon recovered and was sent back to live with her parents.
• Mina was 9-years old when she was promised to another man by her father, so that he could have another wife. A few months later, the 29-year-old fiancé kidnapped her and began to brutally rape her. The fiancé’s mother tried to protect Mina for as long as she could, but her son continued to rape the poor child for weeks. It got so bad that Mina could no longer sit or walk, was bleeding heavily, and eventually contracted a severe infection. A local community leader was made aware of Mina’s condition and he took her to the nearest clinic, where her case was referred to WAW. Mina was in constant, agonizing pain, and required surgery. After six months of medical care, the doctors were still worried she was too weak for surgery and would die under anesthesia due to the frailty of her condition. Mina was moved to Kabul where medical facilities could better manage her condition. She finally underwent the surgery she required and is now recovering in one of WAW’s Women’s Protection Centers, Mina is now doing much better and is healthy, but she will have to undergo further surgery when she is older.
• 16-year old Marzia was repeatedly raped by her own father. Her father tried to cover up his crime, however, eventually he impregnated her. When Marzia went into premature labor, her mother rushed her to the hospital. When the doctors realized the young girl had no husband, they suspected she was the victim of incest, and called the police immediately. The police referred her case to WAW, which took care of Marzia’s medical care. After her recovery, Marzia was placed in one of WAW’s women’s shelters, where she now attends literacy classes for the first time in her life. Her father has been arrested and sentenced to prison for his crime. Today, Marzia is not only safe, but also happy, and eagerly learning how to read and write with the dream of one day obtaining a university degree.

Population(s) Served
Women and girls
Children and youth

Similar to our Halfway House program, our Transitional Houses provide women transitioning out of prison safe homes, education, counseling, and vocational training. Most women in prison have committed no crime-- they are in prison because they're have ran away from abuse, are accused of adultery, or are taking the rap for a husband, boyfriend or brother.

Women in shelters often have the same problem. They have shamed the family and must be punished. Women alone often end up walking the streets or turning to prostitution. Many end up dead. There is no solid evidence about this population because they aren't worth worrying about enough to collect data. They are simply erased.

But WAW worries about them and also about their children if they have them. What will happen to the children, now thriving in our Children's Support Centers and attending school if they have to return to a village in the middle of nowhere, without a school to attend, and to extended family who will torture if not kill them and their mothers. These women will enter WAW's Transitional Houses, the only facilities of their kind for women at risk in Afghanistan. There they will learn a vocation, how to read and write, how to manage money and other life skills. In other words, we will help them prepare for their independent futures. We will find them jobs and a place to live when they're ready to move out of these safe places and into the world.

This important project rounds out the mission of our Family Guidance Centers, our shelters, our Children's Support Centers: to preserve and protect human rights for Afghan women.

Population(s) Served
Women and girls

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of youth receiving services (e.g., groups, skills and job training, etc.) with youths living in their community

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents, Young adults

Related Program

New York Community Center

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of clients and their families receiving case management services in New York.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Families

Related Program

New York Community Center

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of clients and their families receiving legal support services in New York

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

New York Community Center

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of clients participating in adult education classes in New York

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls, Adults

Related Program

New York Community Center

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of individuals receiving services at Family Guidance Center in Afghanistan (e.g., family counseling, mediation and legal representation for human rights violation)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

12 Family Guidance Centers

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of individuals receiving protection services at Women’s Protection Center in Afghanistan (e.g., shelter, legal support, counseling, family remediation, and literacy and life-skills classes)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls

Related Program

12 Women's Protection Centers

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of children receiving services while their mothers are in prison at the Children Support Center in Afghanistan (e.g., safe homes, stability, loving care, and education and tutoring)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

4 Children's Support Centers

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of formerly imprisoned women receiving services at the Transitional Houses in Afghanistan (e.g., safe homes, legal support, family mediation, counseling, education and vocational training)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls

Related Program

3 Transitional Houses

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of individuals receiving long-term shelter and services at the Halfway House in Afghanistan (legal support, family mediation, counseling, education and vocational training)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls

Related Program

3 Transitional Houses

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of refugee returnees and internally displaced families receiving humanitarian services and training on the prevention of gender based violence in Afghanistan.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Number of individuals provided with training and education on women’s rights are human rights trainings in Afghanistan

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of human rights trainings conducted in Afghanistan

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Women and girls, Men and boys

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

WAW is a growing organization with an ambitious vision to reach and empower more Afghan women and families. We seek to be a leader in our field—to be the go-to organization directly serving, assisting, advocating and collaborating for the rights and best interests of Afghan women, children and families.

Our long-term vision for Afghanistan is to open programs in all 34 provinces to ensure that all women and girls have access to justice, safety, and education, while also working towards a world in which Afghan women and girls everywhere enjoy peace and the freedom to participate fully in life without fear.

In New York, we envision WAW's NYCC to become a greater resource for the community and for immigrants and refugees of all backgrounds and ages, especially Muslims. Our language proficiency in six languages and cultural understanding of these communities position us as a valued resource in New York.

In both Afghanistan and in the United States, WAW will continue to advocate for equity and protection of immigrant rights, women’s rights, children’s rights, peace and human rights as a whole.

WAW is the largest and leading human rights organization in Afghanistan with 32 centers and programs in 24 out of the country’s 34 provinces. WAW provides direct social and protection services to women, children, refugee returnees, internally displaced persons (IDPs), and survivors of gender-based violence (GBV). In addition, WAW conducts women’s rights and women in peacebuilding training for the general public in Afghanistan, government officials, civil society organizations, religious leaders, and community stakeholders.

In the US, WAW’s New York Community Center is the only agency with the cultural and linguistic capacities to serve the Afghan immigrant community in NYC and the surrounding region. In addition, WAW also serves South Asian, Muslim, East Asian, and Latinx communities. WAW staff members speak 6 languages: Dari/Farsi, Pashto, Urdu, Hindi, Spanish, and English. Because of WAW’s culturally sensitive services and linguistic proficiencies, WAW serves families outside of NYC remotely, and partners with government agencies and nonprofits to provide services to Muslim families.

WAW works with government agencies to support and improve on policies that protect the rights of women and children. This has included involvement and advocacy around the Elimination of Violence Against Women Law in Afghanistan and encouraging all government agencies and law enforcement to implement the letter of the law. In the US, WAW works with NYC Council Members and Assembly Members to ensure immigrant rights are realized in practicality, such as language access and budget equity in the City Council and NY State.

WAW’s bottom-up culture change work involves family mediation, awareness campaigns, and training for religious and community leaders. All these components discuss healthy relationships, and women’s rights from the perspectives of Islamic law, civil law, and Afghan/Muslim culture. The most concrete effect of this culturally sensitive approach is the gradual and growing support WAW has among community members.

WAW’s work and success are grounded in its community-based approach. All staff are hired locally and have a deep understanding of the communities they serve. The majority of WAW’s 950+ staff are Afghan women, including in senior management and leadership positions.

Similarly, WAW's programming development always follows the results of a needs assessment with target groups and stakeholders. Annual impact and program performance is also evaluated through this needs-based approach to ensure WAW remains responsive to the needs of the families it serves. For example, recent evaluation results revealed the need to expand Children’s Support Centers to Afghanistan's southern provinces to address the lack of shelters for children whose mothers are in prison. Other evaluations identified the need to expand WAW’s domestic violence survivor program in the US to include services for sexual assault suvivors and male survivors of domestic violence.

WAW's grassroots approach and the expertise of its local staff have ensured that WAW has good working relationships with local and national government, community and religious leaders, and community members. These partnerships have allowed WAW to implement programs smoothly and ensure the security of clients and staff. WAW works closely with the Afghan government and the US State Department, the Afghan Ministry of Women's Affairs, and the Office of Afghanistan's First Lady. Other partners include the Afghanistan Independent Human Rights Commission, UN Women, the UN Refugee Agency, and the Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency. WAW is also a proud member of the US-Afghan Women's Council, the Alliance in Support of the Afghan People, the Afghan Shelter Network, and the Afghan Women's Network.

WAW's key stakeholders, program targets, and staff members have been and remain the most marginalized population in Afghanistan—women. WAW is rooted in its grassroots approach, which ensures that it always hires locally in order to best respect and understand local traditions, customs, and challenges. WAW staff is exceptional and regularly go above and beyond their normal duties. In times of acute need, staff members will provide women with shelter in their own homes or volunteer to donate their own blood. In 2014, Najia Nasim, WAW’s Executive Director, was recognized as one of Amnesty International's 10 bravest women in the world and in 2018, she won the Mother Teresa Memorial Award for Social Justice on behalf of WAW. In 2003, WAW received the Union Square Award for social justice and was shortlisted for the 2015 Vaclav Havel Human Rights Prize.

In the US, WAW’s New York Community Center (NYCC) staff are a critical part of establishing trust with the Afghan and Muslim immigrant communities and partnerships with other service-providing agencies and organizations in NYC. The staff members are mostly women from the local community, who have deep connection and understanding of the religious and cultural sensitivities of the community members to meet their critical needs and help uplift women and families to build a better life in the US. Additionally, the New York staff members speak six languages: Dari/Farsi, Pashto, Urdu, Hindi, Spanish, and English. The NYC Mayor’s office has recognized the incredible work of our staff. Our US Country Director, Naheed Samadi Bahram, was accepted into the 2017 Cohort of New York Community Trust Leadership Fellows and honored as an Advocate of New York City by NYC Mayor's Office to Combat Domestic Violence. In 2019, WAW’s NYCC's Case Manager Shgoofa Rahmani was honored as an Advocate of New York City by NYC Mayor’s Office to End Domestic and Gender-Based Violence for her incredible work in the Afghan and Muslim immigrant communities. Today, NYCC is a life-line to the Afghan and Muslim immigrant community and plays a critical role in assisting families transition to their new life in the US and succeed.

• Since WAW’s founding in 2001, WAW has positively impacted the lives of over 1.3 million women, children, refugees, immigrants, and families in Afghanistan and U.S.

• WAW also contributed to the successful passing of the Elimination of Violence Against Women (EVAW) law in 2009 which outlawed rape, sexual assault, forced prostitution and marriage, physical and emotional abuse, and much more in GBV, protecting 15 million+ women and girls.

• WAW now provides life-saving services to 10,000 Afghan women and children each year.

• In total, we have educated 396,500+ men and women on “Women's Rights are Human Rights", and successfully involving local government, religious leaders, community leaders, educators, and community members in education efforts.

• Since 2003, WAW’s NYCC has provided 24,000 case management and legal services to over 7,000 women and families; over 2,800 women have been empowered through adult education; 670 individuals have taken the US naturalization exam with an 87% success rate; and 740 youth have benefitted from tutoring and leadership development programs.

• In 2019, WAW launched the following new programs:

The Peace Building Program to ensure women’s voices are included in Afghanistan’s peace process and trained more than 13,000 individuals to about peacebuilding and peace-sustaining initiatives in Afghanistan.

The #ByHerSide Women’s Health Program benefitted 2,682 women and girls by providing emergency and critical medical care, maternity care, and protection for survivors of rape, incest, and gender-based violence in 14 provinces in Afghanistan.

Mobile centers to reach displaced persons and refugees in Afghanistan.

The Education for Leadership in Crisis program, a full-ride undergraduate scholarship program for Afghan women to study at American University in Beirut. 16 women have already benefited through the program.

A Seniors Program was launched at the NYCC to assist elderly women in the community build a sense of belonging, socialize, and reduce feelings of isolation. 15 women have already benefited.

The NYCC organized Family Nights with local mosques in Queens, NY to reach over 300 community members on healthy families and how to prevent domestic violence.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

Financials

Women for Afghan Women
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Women for Afghan Women

Board of directors
as of 8/30/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Sunita Viswanath

Co-Founder and Board Chair, WAW

Sunita Viswanath

Co-Founder and Board Chair

Masuda Sultan

Afghanistan-based advocate and entrepreneur

Leslie Cunningham

Women's advocate through husband, James B. Cunningham, Diplomat for U.S.

Meg Barnette

Vice President of Strategic Initiatives at Planned Parenthood of New York City

Terry Merkle

Owner, Paradigm Shift Worldwide, Inc; Production & Special Events Services, Inc.

Jackie Moore

Brazilian Journalist, Anchorman, Reporter, Philanthropist, Afghanistan Advocate

Belquis Ahmadi

Liselott Liungman

Annie Pforzheimer

Senior Associate (Non-resident) at Center for Strategic and International Studies

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 05/06/2020

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Afghan
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 05/06/2020

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.