ADLER APHASIA CENTER

Connect. Empower. Enrich.

aka Adler Aphasia Center   |   Maywood, NJ   |  www.adleraphasiacenter.org

Mission

Our Mission is to enrich the lives of people with aphasia, their families, and communities. Our Vision is to reach everyone affected by aphasia. The Adler Aphasia Center Board of Directors and Staff gathered for a strategic planning process. As a result of the strategic planning process, the Adler Aphasia Center has a compelling mission and vision as well as a clearly developed plan for the future. The plan provides direction for creating sustainable membership growth, building awareness about aphasia and our services, sourcing sustainable funding, developing a workforce poised to meet future growth needs of the agency, and meeting emerging needs with innovation.

Ruling year info

2003

President and CEO

Ms. Naomi Gewirtz

Main address

60 West Hunter Ave.

Maywood, NJ 07607 USA

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EIN

02-0687863

NTEE code info

Health Treatment Facilities (Primarily Outpatient) (E30)

Senior Centers/Services (P81)

Specifically Named Diseases (G80)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Life-Skills Program

The Center’s life -skills programs and activities are facilitated by speech-language pathologists and healthcare professionals who share the primary goals of enhancing the communication skills of its members with aphasia and providing opportunities for social and peer support, while building members’ self-esteem and confidence. Caregiver needs are addressed through weekly caregiver support groups. Training and educational programs are offered to healthcare professionals, consumers, educators, students, speech-language pathologists and others interested in improving the quality of life for those affected by aphasia. The Center is also actively engaged in research efforts that examine the impact of its programs.

Population(s) Served
People with diseases and illnesses
Caregivers

Where we work

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Members are people with aphasia, who contribute meaningfully to program design and direction.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time,

Financials

ADLER APHASIA CENTER
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

ADLER APHASIA CENTER

Board of directors
as of 10/13/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Mr. Charles Berkowitz

Consultant, Jewish Home Family, NJ

Term: 2013 -


Board co-chair

Ms. Sophie Heymann

Retired, Mayor of Closter, NJ

Term: 2013 -

Elaine Adler

Owner, Myron Corp

William Adler

Bill Adler Realty

Dana Post Adler

VP, Myron Corp

David Albalah

Owner, Albalah Group

Gary Alweiss

Neurologist, Willner & Alweiss

Paul Aronsohn

Dir Executive Communications, Bristol-Myers Squibb

Diana DiGirolamo

Exec Dir, Community Resource Council of Bergen County

Barbara Drench

Community Activist

Sandra Gold

Pres &CEO, Arnold P. Gold Foundation

Sandra Govic

VP, Investment Advisor, PNC Bank

Dennis Gralla

Principal, Cresa NJ

Steven Morey Greenberg

Senior Partner, Greenberg & Lanz

Walter Hecht

Owner, WJH Consultants

Anthony Iovino

Principal, Arcari+Iovino Architects

Ellen Jacobs

Community Activist

Peggy Kabakow

Community Activist

Bernard Koster

Philanthropist

Paul Koury

Senior Counsel, PBF Energy

David Kravecas

Property Manager, Beekman Estate

William Murray

Exec VP, National Director, MWW PR

Christine Ordway

Philanthropist

Susan Penn

Philanthropist

Jill Tekel

North NJ Region Hadassah Board

William Zipse

Retired Pharmacist, and member of Adler Aphasia Center

James Adler

Honorary Board, CEO, Myron Corp

Steve Adubato

Public Television Anchor NYC, author and speaker

Angelica Berrie

President, Russell Berrie Foundation

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Not applicable

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 10/13/2021,

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

No data

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 10/13/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
Policies and processes
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.