Missouri River Relief

See you on the River!

aka RIVER RELIEF INC   |   Columbia, MO   |  www.riverrelief.org

Mission

Missouri River Relief 's mission is to engage individuals and communities along the Missouri River in the exploration, enjoyment, restoration and care of the river through hands-on river clean-ups, education programs and stewardship activities.

Ruling year info

2002

Executive Director

Steve Schnarr

Main address

PO Box 463

Columbia, MO 65205 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

03-0425187

NTEE code info

Natural Resource Conservation and Protection (C30)

Educational Services and Schools - Other (B90)

Environmental Quality, Protection, and Beautification N.E.C. (C99)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2019, 2018 and 2017.
Register now

Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The Missouri River played a vital role in the development of many cities along its stretch, but that time has now passed. The river has since been neglected by its communities and suffers from illegally dumped and improperly disposed of trash. Missouri River Relief has identified that the communities in which it serves are now eager to assist the river, but often lack the resources and knowledge to convey that care through continued stewardship. People are often unaware that their actions cause watershed pollution such as when litter on the street is washed by stormwater into municipal drainage systems. Forty-three percent of Missourians receive their drinking water from the Missouri River and these contaminants are difficult to remove in the treatment process. Wildlife is also negatively impacted, both biologically with ingested plastic causing strangulation or internal organ failure, and chemically, when pharmaceutical pollution leeches from littered pill bottles.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

River Clean-ups

Since 2001 we have held 203 river cleanups, removed over 1,013 tons of trash from 1,560 miles of the Missouri River with the help of over 29,799 volunteers. Our programs intertwine education with hands-on stewardship to create a sense of responsibility towards the care of the river, leading to long-term change.

https://riverrelief.org/about/our-impact/

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth

Missouri River Education engages participants’ innate sense of wonder and natural curiosity to explore the Missouri River through place-based programs that are interdisciplinary in nature and experiential in character. We seek to build participants’ knowledge and understanding of the Missouri River through hands-on experiences that will deepen their connection and sense of responsibility to its care and stewardship. Informed by our research and experience working with communities along the Missouri River, we believe this approach inspires community engagement, academic achievement and a sense of stewardship.

We've held over 200 educational river trips and engaged with over 30,874 students and teachers.

https://riverrelief.org/programs/river-education/

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Students

A monthly presentation by experts about various topics related to the Missouri River in three venue across the State of Missouri--Kansas City, Rocheport and St. Charles.

https://www.bigmuddyspeakers.org/

Population(s) Served
Students

A 16 or 27 mile canoe/kayak/SUP race on the Missouri River finishing at Wilson's Serenity Point in Jefferson City, MO. Benefits Missouri River Relief.
http://racetothedome.org/

Population(s) Served
Adults

The Missouri 340 is an endurance race across the state of Missouri. Competitors will start in Kansas City and finish, some of them anyway, in St. Charles. With numerous towns, the course offers plenty of opportunity for resupply while enroute. The Missouri River is also incredibly scenic and isolated in some stretches, with wildlife and beautiful vistas to rival any river in North America. But if you’re trying to win this race, you won’t have time to enjoy any of it.

Solo paddlers have 86 hours to complete the course. All others must complete in 85 hours. There are nine checkpoints along the route where paddlers are required to sign in and sign out. Cutoff times will be associated with these checkpoints based on the 86 hour pace. Failure to miss a deadline is grounds for disqualification. To finish this race in 86 hours is a huge accomplishment. Only 2/3 of the teams were able to do so during the 2021 MR340.

Competitors come from all over the world!

https://rivermiles.com

Population(s) Served
Adults
Adults

Where we work

Awards

Conservation Organization of the Year 2018

Conservation Federation of Missouri

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The main objective of our programs is to educate the communities in which we serve on the causes and outcomes of improperly disposed of trash while creating a sense of responsibility for their natural resource through hands-on stewardship activities with tangible results. MRR accomplishes our objectives through our large-scale cleanups which engage volunteers in stewardship along the Missouri River which enforces causes and effects of improperly disposing of waste and instilling a sense of responsibility for natural resources. MRR cleanups are community stewardship and education events that put volunteers on the banks of the Missouri River to work in teams to remove tons of trash, hazardous household waste, trash tires, and recyclable goods from the banks.

Missouri River Relief’s large-scale cleanup events accomplish many objectives while providing safe ways to engage people’s natural curiosity to explore the river. We seek to build an appreciation of the Missouri River through on-the-water cleanups that both create long-term best practices and instill a sense of responsibility for their natural resource. Informed by 19 years working with St. Louis communities, we believe this approach inspires community engagement to improve the environment and divert waste from landfills with recycling practices.

Missouri River Education engages participants’ innate sense of wonder and natural curiosity to explore the Missouri River through place-based programs that are interdisciplinary in nature and experiential in character. We seek to build participants’ knowledge and understanding of the Missouri River through hands-on experiences that will deepen their connection and sense of responsibility for its care and stewardship. Informed by our research and experience working with communities along the Missouri River, we believe this approach inspires community engagement, academic achievement and a sense of stewardship.

Missouri River Education focuses on the development of three core competencies that are integrated into each program. These core competencies serve as targets for participant’s growth, points of participant’s dialogue and criteria for program assessment. - Knowledgeable Ecologist, Insightful Historian, conscientious community member.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    A large percent of Missourians use the Missouri River for drinking water, food, and recreation. Missouri River Relief serves them and anyone else who lives downstream. The Missouri River's watershed reaches as north as Canada and as west as the Rocky Mountains, so anyone in the watershed has an affect on this river. We are a volunteer and equipment-based organization dedicated to connecting people to the Missouri River through hands-on river cleanups, education programs, and recreational opportunities.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Community meetings/Town halls,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Because of Covid-19, we had to cancel a lot of our programs/events. People asked us how they could still get out of their homes and participate, which sparked the creation of a new program called, "Trash Mobs" to give community groups an opportunity to still cleanup their neighborhoods or waterways. We had 105 Trash Mobs participate in the 2020 year. We also changed our cleanup model to fit the necessary restrictions of Covid-19 during 2021 since our biggest feedback was more participation options. This cleanup event model went from 1 cleanup day with 200+ people to 3 cleanup days with no more than 30 people each day.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Since our mission is to connect people to the river, we want people to be comfortable to volunteer for us and see the change we're making. Ultimately, we want the people we serve to come out and see the river through their own lenses. For example, we had a new program for the 2021 year called "Mornings at the River" where families and their children under 5 have the opportunity to come out and enjoy river/camping activities. One of the mothers shared, “Thank you for providing this awesome opportunity. I am terrified of rivers, so taking my kids to the river is something I wouldn't be likely to do on my own, so thank you for encouraging this experience!” We've taken our feedback from this program and realized more of what we can do for families with younger children.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time,

Financials

Missouri River Relief
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Missouri River Relief

Board of directors
as of 11/23/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Lynne Hooper

Hydrologist - Boone County, MO

Term: 2019 - 2021

Michael Crist

Owner and Operator of Dry Holler Foods, Executive Director, Managing member of Tatanka Resources

Kory Kaufman

Retired Science Teacher - Columbia Public Schools

Bill Fessler

Kansas City Parks and Recreation

Diana Papoulias

Retired Fisheries Biologist - U.S. Geological Survey; Acsension Mission Leader of Exxpedition

Nic Rogers

Ozark Regional Land Trust

Cathy Gunther

University of Missouri - Columbia

Dana Kee

Ellis Fischel Cancer Center

Drew Lemberger

Owner, Mt. Nebo Inn B&B & Missouri Boatworks

Tom Lemley

Attorney, Bridgepoint Law Firm, LLC

Kent Robinson

Plumb Supply, Race Director of Osage Spring 12

Heidi Sharp

Veterans United

Kris Mattern

Owner of Kristyle Marketing, Freelance Graphic Artist: Pring, Digital & Web

Sandy Neal

Regional Director of Utitlity Acquisitions at Central States Water Resources

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 11/23/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data