CHAMPLAIN COMMUNITY SERVICES

Everyone participates, everyone belongs

aka CCS, Inc.   |   Colchester, VT   |  www.ccs-vt.org

Mission

Champlain Community Services provides essential supports to people with intellectual disabilities and autism, building a community where everyone participates and everyone belongs.

Ruling year info

1968

Executive Director

Elizabeth Sightler

Main address

512 Troy Avenue

Colchester, VT 05446 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

03-6015899

NTEE code info

Developmentally Disabled Services/Centers (P82)

Employment Training (J22)

Other Youth Development N.E.C. (O99)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2020, 2019 and 2018.
Register now

Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

As a nonprofit serving Vermont, Champlain Community Service (CCS) believes all Vermonters deserve the opportunity to earn income, achieve independence, fully participate and truly belong in their communities. For more than 50 years, CCS has supported people with intellectual disabilities and autism in their quest for full participation. Unfortunately, barriers remain: our neighbors with disabilities are too often marginalized or excluded in their efforts to find work or housing and achieve independence. Large discrepancies in unemployment between disabled and non-disabled citizens are still reflected in employment data. As a Specialized Services Agency (SSA) within the State of Vermont's internationally recognized developmental services system of care, CCS is focused on employment. Through a state-of-the-art program of assessment, training, placement, coaching, and support - and powerful partnerships with area employers - we are showing that with proper supports, anyone can work.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Way2Work Program

Way2Work is a nationally-recognized supported employment program serving individuals with developmental and intellectual disabilities. Way2Work offers skills assessment, career development, job training, placement, and support for meaningful jobs in the competitive economy. Way2Work also supports aspiring entrepreneurs with disabilities to plan, launch, and pursue their own micro-business start-ups.

Population(s) Served
Adults

A high school to work career development transition program for students with developmental and intellectual disabilities.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
People with intellectual disabilities

Bridging helps school-aged youth with disabilities step confidently into their adult years by introducing them to meaningful community opportunities, exploring topics connected to healthy adult living and building healthy relationships.
Working with para-educators from partner schools, Bridging Coordinator Emily Anderson, guides students through a full academic year organized around four learning modules: career exploration, community connection, independent living, and advocacy.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
People with intellectual disabilities

Where we work

Accreditations

Our Way2Work Employment program named Top Performing program in Vermont by State of Vermont 2019

Awards

Shortlist: Employment 2021 2020

Zero Project Award

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Average hourly wage of clients who became employed after job skills training

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Health

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Percentage of participating employers satisfied with the program

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

CCS seeks to build a community where everyone participates and belongs. We provide an array of supports to people with intellectual disabilities and autism - at work, at home, at school, for life. We deliver services with a personal approach: individualized, carefully coordinated, and community based.

Our focus is employment, so our goal is to eliminate the stigma of disability in the workplace and support those we serve in gaining meaningful, minimum-wage or higher jobs that fill real needs for their employers and offer opportunities for both independence and advancement. We want students with disabilities to be thinking of work after high school while still in high school (as non-disabled students are routinely encouraged and supported to do).

We want to break the cycle of isolation that impacts many people with disabilities, Clearly the workplace is one step, but so too is ensuring access to independent living situations and full participation in community activities: from recreation and fitness, to leisure, continuing education and cultural activities, to voting and participation in community leadership and governance.

We host and co-facilitate an active Self-Advocates group, Champlain Voices.

We outreach community groups and associations, as well as employers, to offer education and build the partnerships that break down the "service-delivery" model and build real connections for participation and achievement.

Our main strategy is full participation and partnership. The goals we seek can only be achieved in the broader community. Gaining full participation and inclusion for people with intellectual disabilities is not an academic puzzle to be solved in our offices or at a group home. It's in real life: at work, at school, in the neighborhood or apartment building. And it's not 9-to-5, but 24/7.

Our Way2Work program is so successful, in part, because it meets employers where they are. "Hey, there's a labor shortage! Need good employees? Let's design a training program together that meets YOUR needs as well as ours!"

We encourage our consumers to get involved in the community as leaders. Two serve on our own Board of Directors. Other serve on boards or as community volunteers throughout our service area. Our self-advocates do workshops and TV shows. It's our belief that "everyone participates and everyone belongs." So, we push participation and that leads to belonging!

We participate as an organization: we are members of the Lake Champlain Regional Chamber of Commerce and Vermont Businesses for Social Responsibility (VBSR). We are part of the Vermont Care Partners collaborative, we are part of a Public Health Partnership that works with medical students at the University of Vermont Medical Center. We collaborate with Think College VT to help provide post-secondary education experiences to students with intellectual disabilities.

For us, community is where the action is, so we are involved, visible, and engaged.

Our supported employment program, Way2Work, has been named the top such program by the State of Vermont for eight consecutive years. (And that means a lot! Vermont's supported employment system itself was recognized internationally last year with a Zero Project Award for Innovation in Employment, awarded at the United Nations in Vienna, Austria). We've built the program and refine it continuously. We now offer a continuum of supports - unique in Vermont, and perhaps regionally or nationally) that offers employment support from high school to retirement age; from pre-vocational experiences and assessments, through transitional jobs and internships, to first jobs, to career development and advancement.

Our pre-vocational component, Bridging, offers high school students career exploration as well as community engagement and advocacy experiences in partnership with five Chittenden County high schools (though we expect this to expand to other counties). The program has gone to a whole new level since CCS took over its coordination three years ago (at the urging of our partner schools). School2Work works with school to career transitions for graduating students (or those "aging out" of high school)

We have created service delivery models that are setting standards for replication, we are financially stable, have an extremely strong network of community partners, and all five members of our Senior Management team have been with the agency for 12-plus years. Our management staff is engaged and veteran, our consumers have a store voice in our operation, and our direct support staff is deep and well-trained.
We are a known and respected community partner, twice named "Best Non-Profit" in the region by a business magazine.

CCS has been named the top supported employment program in the state for the past eight years. We have earned "National Best Practices" recognition through APSE: The Network on Employment. CCS was selected to train supported employment and vocational rehabilitation professionals throughout Vermont on supporting entrepreneurs with disabilities to launch micro-businesses. We have earned consistently high (90-plus percent) from employers and program participants.

Other agencies and community partners are contracting with CCS to enhance their employment programs (or even manage them), we are coordinating Bridging on behalf of Chittenden County high schools, have recently expanded our home and shared living supports to include Homeward, an independent alternative to assisted living or "nursing homes" for seniors or young adults with disabilities, and will soon host a site for Global Campus.

We've changed the face of employment in Vermont, together with our colleagues in the field and the Developmental Service system: for institutions, to "sheltered workshops" to fledgling supported employment initiatives, to a world leader in that field, while also providing self-employment and post-secondary education opportunities to People with intellectual disabilities.

What's next? How can even more naturally collaborative partnerships enhance our model of full inclusion and participation? For our consumers, and our community partners. Our goal must be to stay open to innovation, new partners, approaches, and models.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    SMS text surveys, Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Community meetings/Town halls, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    CCS supports Vermonters with intellectual disabilities and autism. One of our key goals is to encourage self-advocacy and self-determination. We host a robust self-advocates group called Champlain Voices. The group met to ask for our agency to tweak our COVID-19 meeting guidelines to allow for hybrid meetings (on-line and in-person) for that group. The group's President made a strong formal presentation to our COVID-19 Task Force and we jointly worked out revised safety protocols that insured masking and distancing while allowing greater in-person meeting capabilities. WE also purchased tents to allow for outdoor meeting space.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

CHAMPLAIN COMMUNITY SERVICES
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

CHAMPLAIN COMMUNITY SERVICES

Board of directors
as of 2/18/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Zoltan Sachs

MBF Bioscience

Term: 2013 - 2022

Peter McDougall

Moira Mulligan

Secretary

Jim Caffry

Peggy Day

Vice President

Ken Lafoe

Peter McDougall

Jay Lafayette

Bethany Dubuque

Treasurer

Carter Bradshaw

Jackson DeLilli

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 2/18/2021,

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

No data

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data