PLATINUM2024

Animal Rescue League of Boston

A champion for animals

Dedham, MA   |  www.arlboston.org

Mission

The Animal Rescue League (ARL) is an unwavering champion for animals in need, committed to keeping them safe and healthy in habitats and homes.

Ruling year info

1943

President & CEO

Dr. Edward Schettino

Main address

10 Anna's Place

Dedham, MA 02026 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

04-2103714

NTEE code info

Animal Protection and Welfare (includes Humane Societies and SPCAs) (D20)

Veterinary Services (D40)

Animal Related Activities N.E.C. (D99)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2022, 2021 and 2020.
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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Our vision is to confront animal cruelty and neglect at its root causes. Through programs, services, and facilities focused on accessible animal care, public advocacy, and sustained anti-cruelty efforts, we will be a resource for people and an unwavering champion for animals most in need. Our focus will be to meet people and animals where they are, bringing veterinary and wellness services directly to those who need it most, so that animals are safe and healthy living in communities and out of shelters. We will align our resources to support this vision through a coordination of existing programs and the development of new, community-based services. The impact of our work will be seen in the lives of animals most in need across Massachusetts, with the greatest effect in our primary service areas of Greater Boston, Eastern Massachusetts, and the Cape Cod regions.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Animal Care and Adoption

Animal Care and Adoption services include intake, shelter and care, behavioral assessment, enrichment, and adoption. These services are offered at three centers located in Boston, Dedham, and Brewster.

The Transport Waggin’ links together ARL’s locations and programs so that animals have access to the exact resources they need. The vehicle also allows ARL to transport out-of-state animals, and assist municipal shelters, animal control facilities, and smaller rescue groups.

Healthy Moms, Happy Litters provides assistance to local families and their pets. The program offers free high-quality spay/neuter services and vaccinations for mother/father cats or dogs, and the litter of kittens/puppies will be placed up for adoption once eligible.

In 2021 outcomes include:
2,872 Adoptions
90% Live Release Rate – the rate of adoptions or return to field outcomes, as defined by the ASPCA
564 Activities completed by the Transport Waggin'
351 Animals transported from out of state

Population(s) Served
Adults

Law Enforcement investigates crimes of animal cruelty, abuse, and neglect. ARL employs Special State Police Officers, with the authority to enforce animal cruelty and neglect laws. These officers work closely with local, state, and federal law enforcement agencies, prosecutors, and animal control officers throughout the Commonwealth.

2021 outcomes include:

3,701 animals inspected
544 Active Investigations
3 cases resulting in large-scale animal intake

Population(s) Served
Adults

Community Veterinary Services serves animals and people in the communities where they live.

The Spay Waggin’, a mobile veterinary surgical unit, provides low cost spay and neuter services in Southeastern Massachusetts, Cape Cod, and the Islands.

The Wellness Waggin’, a mobile veterinary unit, hosts low cost weekly pet wellness clinics in Greater Boston.

The Community Surgical Clinic provides both veterinary and surgical services at our Dedham campus, including the Community Cat Initiative.

Shelter Veterinary Services provides comprehensive veterinary services for ARL’s Animal Care and Adoption Centers

2021 outcomes include:

5,030 veterinarian exams by Shelter Veterinary Services
4,401 Spay/Neuter surgeries provided by the Spay Waggin’
3,650 pets seen at pet wellness clinics in Dorchester, Mattapan, Roxbury, and East Boston
1,995 surgeries performed by Shelter Veterinary Services
435 surgeries provided by the Community Surgical clinic
15 Partner sites for the Spay Waggin’

Population(s) Served
Adults
Economically disadvantaged people

Field Services provides rescue for injured domestic animals, livestock, and birds of prey.

Keep Pets S.A.F.E. (Supporting Animals Facing Emergencies) provides emergency services to help keep pets with their families, including delivery of pet food and essential supplies; temporary shelter for pets; and arrangements for the emergency surrender of pets.

Temporary Pet Housing offers 120 days of housing for pets whose owners may be experiencing housing instability or are at imminent risk of homelessness.

The Community Cat Initiative assists “community cats” (feral, semi-feral and outdoor cats). A dedicated field services agent assesses a colony of cats and formulates TNR (Trap-Neuter-Return) plans. Cats also receive veterinary car and are evaluated for adoption potential.

2021 outcomes include:

2,787 activities completed by Field Services
896 activities completed by Keep Pets SAFE
504 Community cats adopted
249 Trap-Neuter-Return surgeries completed

Population(s) Served
Adults
Economically disadvantaged people

ARL seeks to make long-term gains for animals by advocating for humane laws, policies, and regulations. ARL engages dedicated staff and volunteers to draft and advocate for legislation and policy with local, state, and federal government.

Population(s) Served
Adults

ARL recruits and supports over 1,000 volunteers and over 500 foster families who contribute more than 39,000 hours of service each year. Volunteers provide critical support for animal enrichment, and socialization; as well as advocacy, administration, and customer service roles.

In 2021, 1,059 volunteers contributed 39,515 hours of service.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Affiliations & memberships

American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals

Humane Society of the United States

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of animals receiving subsidized or free spay/neuter services

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Community & Shelter Medicine

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Includes subsidized spay/neuter surgeries provided by the Spay Waggin' & Community Surgical Clinic. These programs were affected by temporary program suspensions and operations changed due to COVID

Number of veterinary field clinics held

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Community & Shelter Medicine

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

2018 was the first year of our Pet Wellness Clinics. In 2023, 3,229 pets received wellness exams.

Number of animals spayed and neutered

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Community & Shelter Medicine

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of animal adoptions

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Animal Care and Adoption

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

In 2020, our adoption numbers were affected by temporary program suspensions due to COVID-19

Average number of days of shelter stay for dogs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Animal Care and Adoption

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Shelter Stay (SS) is affected by animals who need to stay in shelter care for longer periods of time for various reasons - law enforcement cases, behavior/medical care, etc. 2023 Median SS = 13 days

Average number of days of shelter stay for cats and small animals

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Animal Care and Adoption

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Cats - Avg Shelter Stay: 14 days; Median Shelter Stay: 8 days Small Animals - Avg Shelter Stay: 32 days; Median Shelter Stay: 11 days

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our vision is to confront animal cruelty and neglect at its root causes. Through programs, services, and facilities focused on accessible animal care, public advocacy, and sustained anti-cruelty efforts, we will be a resource for people and an unwavering champion for animals most in need.

Our focus will be to meet people and animals where they are, bringing veterinary and wellness services directly to those who need it most, so that animals are safe and healthy living in communities and out of shelters. We will align our resources to support this vision through a coordination of existing programs and the development of new, community-based services.

The impact of our work will be seen in the lives of animals most in need across Massachusetts, with the greatest effect in our primary service areas of Greater Boston, Eastern Massachusetts, and the Cape Cod regions.

In order to see our vision realized, ARL’s areas of focus for the next 5 years are:

1. Prevent animal cruelty and neglect by strengthening law and public policy and increasing community awareness and action to report and combat abuse.
2. Grow and refocus programs targeted towards those animals in greatest need and to the people who care for them.
3. Grow volunteer membership and attract and retain a well-trained, committed staff to support program growth and strategic goals.
4. Increase financial resources to achieve greater impact for animals in need.
5. Enhance the capacity of ARL infrastructure to ensure the most effective and efficient use of resources for achieving organizational goals.

The ARL team is comprised of professionals committed to delivering high-quality direct animal care which meets best practice standards in animal welfare. Our team consists of skilled shelter agents, veterinarians, law enforcement police officers, technical animal rescue technicians, community liaisons and dedicated volunteers -- all committed to carry out our mission every day.

1. Prevent animal cruelty and neglect by strengthening law and public policy and increasing community awareness and action to report and combat abuse.
• Began recruitment and utilization of volunteers for virtual advocacy work.
• Promoted the annual, Too Hot for Spot®, public awareness campaign for the 7th consecutive year.
• Provided two trainings on reporting animal cruelty and how to recognize and report animal abuse to the Massachusetts State Police Academy and a training at the Department of Children and Families.

2. Grow and refocus programs targeted towards those animals in greatest need and to the people who care for them.
- To best serve these people and animals we launched two new programs:
• The Keep Pets S.A.F.E. (Supporting Animals Facing Emergencies) program provides emergency services to help keep pets with their families during the COVID-19 pandemic, including contactless delivery of pet food and essential supplies; pick up and transfer of pets to provide critical veterinary care; temporary emergency shelter for pets; and arrangements for the emergency surrender of pets.
• The Temporary Pet Housing Initiative assists pet owners who may be experiencing housing instability or who may be in imminent risk of homelessness as a result of COVID-related eviction. The initiative offers eligible clients up to 120 days of temporary pet housing.

• Expanded the Wellness Waggin’ to a new East Boston site and established a spay/neuter referral program for clients through the Spay Waggin’ and Community Surgical Clinic.
• Mobilized a new, state-of-the-art Spay Waggin’ vehicle in June and resumed operations in the City of Boston for the first time in over a decade.

3. Grow volunteer membership and attract and retain a well-trained, committed staff to support program growth and strategic goals.
• 840 dedicated volunteers contributed over 63,000 hours.
• Grew foster network to 435 families.
• Promoted 7 staff members.

4. Increase financial resources to achieve greater impact for animals in need.
• Raised more than $3M in public support from 11,710 donors, an increase from 2019.
• Grew individual giving by more than 10%.

5.Enhance the capacity of ARL infrastructure to ensure the most effective and efficient use of resources for achieving organizational goals.
• Converted the old Spay Waggin’ to a stationary surgical suite in Brewster to lower outside veterinary expenses and the stress on animals being transported.
• Received approval from the Planning Board for the Dedham construction project. Schematic designs, design development, and construction documents were completed.
• Responded to the COVID-19 crisis with a rapid shift to remote operations supported by IT. Phone trees were rerouted and new software was implemented to allow for telemedicine veterinary services.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We act on the feedback we receive

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, It is difficult to identify actionable feedback

Financials

Animal Rescue League of Boston
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
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  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Animal Rescue League of Boston

Board of directors
as of 02/02/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Mr. Walter Kenyon

Retired

Term: 2019 -


Board co-chair

Laura Tomasetti

360PR+

Term: 2020 -

Edward Schettino. DVM, PhD

Animal Rescue League of Boston, President

Walter Kenyon

Richard Kelly

Alisa Plazonja

Christina Nagler

Heather Ridill

Tara Oliver

Laura Tomasetti

Chris Primiano

Jose Rodriguez-Villalobos

Nadine Pellegrini

Renee Knilans

Rod MacDonald

Cynthia Kettyle

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 4/27/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, or other sexual orientations in the LGBTQIA+ community
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

No data

Transgender Identity

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 10/04/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.