Educational Institutions

Clarke School for the Deaf

aka Clarke Schools for Hearing and Speech

Northampton, MA

Mission

Clarke Schools for Hearing and Speech provides children who are deaf or hard of hearing with the listening and spoken language skills they need to succeed.

Ruling Year

1938

Interim CEO

Mr. Doug S. Scott

Chairman of the Board of Trustees

Hugh Babowal

Main Address

45 Round Hill Rd.

Northampton, MA 01060 USA

Keywords

deaf children, auditory/oral education, deafness, hearing loss, hearing impaired, National, Massachusetts, New York, Pennsylvania and Florida, listening & spoken language program, LSL

EIN

04-2104008

 Number

0739160402

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Education N.E.C. (B99)

Specialized Education Institutions/Schools for Visually or Hearing Impaired, Learning Disabled (B28)

Graduate, Professional(Separate Entities) (B50)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Programs + Results

What we aim to solve New!

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Our programs

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Early Intervention (EI)

Preschool and Pre-Kindergarten Programs

Kindergarten through Grade Eight

Mainstream Services

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Our Results

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one. These quantitative program results are self-reported by the organization, illustrating their committment to transparency, learning, and interest in helping the whole sector learn and grow.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Number of students enrolled

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

People with hearing impairments,

Children and youth (0-19 years)

Context notes

Snapshot of enrollment in April of each year. Enrollment fluctuates as children are diagnosed and enroll then age-out and enter the Mainstream. Does not include children receiving one-time services.

Number of Individualized Education Programs (IEPs) developed

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

Children and youth (0-19 years),

People with hearing impairments

Context notes

Enrollment fluctuates as children age-out and enter the mainstream, Represents IEPs for children ages 3-14 as of April in each year. Does not include IEP assistance provided to Mainstream students.

Number of students per teacher during the reporting period

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

Children and youth (0-19 years),

People with hearing impairments

Context notes

On average, each Preschool-Pre-K and K-8 class features a teacher-student ratio of no greater than 10 students to one Teacher and one Assistant Teacher.

Number of students receiving personal instruction and feedback about their performance

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

Children and youth (0-19 years),

People with hearing impairments

Context notes

Figure mirrors enrollment as each child represented is learning as part of an intensive, direct-service oriented program where Clarke professionals work closely with children and families.

Average number of years of formal education for teachers/instructors

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

Children and youth (0-19 years),

People with hearing impairments

Context notes

Represents total number of years obtaining post-secondary education (undergraduate/graduate) for all teachers providing direct services and Speech Language Pathologists. Does not include audiologists

Percentage of board members making a financial contribution

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

Children and youth (0-19 years),

People with hearing impairments

Context notes

Each year, 100% of Board members provide a financial contribution. Many also support outreach and fundraising efforts with other donors.

Percentage of children performing at average or above average on standardized assessments

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

Children and youth (0-19 years),

People with hearing impairments

Related program

Preschool and Pre-Kindergarten Programs

Context notes

Percentage of preschool children meeting or exceeding assessments of receptive/expressive vocabulary and total language. Data not available for 2013

Charting Impact

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What is the organization aiming to accomplish?

What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?

What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?

How will they know if they are making progress?

What have and haven't they accomplished so far?

Our mission is to provide children who are deaf or hard of hearing with the listening, learning, and spoken language skills needed to succeed. Clarke focus is:

Transforming Lives – Clarke transforms the lives of children who are deaf and hard of hearing by helping them develop the skills they need to succeed in the speaking world.

Listening and Speaking – Clarke teaches children how to listen and speak, laying the foundation of language and communication for fully engaged lives.

Family Partnerships – Clarke partners with families as they navigate the learning process, helping them to identify options and make informed choices to maximize their child's potential.

Whole Child Approach – Clarke responds to the needs of the whole child – social, academic, psychological – creating confidence and independence.

Clarke seeks to ensure that every family of a child who is deaf or hard of hearing that wishes to pursue a Listening and Spoken Language (LSL) approach, has access to high-quality services.

Clarke is deeply committed to helping our children achieve the outcomes described herein as well as to build capacity and sustainability. We continue to expand and to develop more efficient ways to meet the increased demand for LSL services and address the shortage of providers. With the use of technology and through programs such as tVISIT, Clarke is able to provide services regardless of a family's location using a more sustainable service delivery method. Clarke will also continue improving and expanding service delivery through partnerships that utilize public or other existing resources at local and state levels. For example, our professionals recently helped the state of Delaware develop their own LSL program. As described throughout, Clarke is working with its peers to more effectively track, engage with, and collect data on our current students, to both strengthen our Clarke community and to produce evidence-based outcomes that support change in policy regarding how children who are deaf or hard of hearing are served.

Clarke's longtime leadership in the field of deaf education, the collective expertise of our staff in serving young children and their families, our commitment to extending services to people who are currently underserved, and our embrace of new technologies and techniques to help children who are deaf or hard of hearing achieve better outcomes, are significant strengths. Clarke counts many of the nation's most well-known and highly-regarded professionals among our faculty and staff. Several of Clarke's senior staff are considered experts in their field, and participate in state and national committees that support the education of children who are deaf or hard of hearing. We have extensive networks of relationships throughout the systems that serve deaf children and families, and especially in the Early Intervention systems. Clarke's professional development workshops and materials, including our annual Mainstream Conference, and collaboration with Fontbonne University, are considered “best in class" and attract students and professionals from around the world.

The system that serves children with hearing loss requires a host of agencies and individuals to work together to play their part in ensuring that every child receives the services s/he needs: early intervention systems, LEAs (Local Education Agencies), schools and teachers, hospitals, audiologists, speech-language pathologists, etc. Clarke is an integral part of this system and is often the coordinating entity. We constantly work in collaboration with a multitude of agencies and individuals in each of our campus locations. Clarke regularly shares information and provides trainings for students and professionals, and also has developed collegial relationships with programs that primarily use sign language in serving children.

In addition to assessments and data collection/analysis of child outcomes, Clarke goes to great lengths to evaluate our work and to stay on the leading edge of innovations of LSL education. Staff meets regularly to review evaluation results and address areas for improvement. Our lead teachers, all of whom have master's degrees, are required to participate in monthly development programs and participate in workshops and conferences.

Organizationally, Clarke began a strategic planning process in 2009 by forming a Strategic Analysis group consisting of staff, trustees and other stakeholders. Through the Strategic Analysis process, we reaffirmed Clarke's mission and streamlined the mission statement to better reflect our current programs and methodologies. Small groups of trustees and staff were formed to delve deeper into a number of focus areas identified through the analysis process. Through the work of these groups, in conjunction with the Board and administration, several major decisions were made by the board including the reduction of our physical space in order to allocate more funding to direct services. Clarke has always offered a wide breadth of programs and services that support a variety of constituencies. While it is important to continue to bring Clarke's expertise to a wide variety of clients, the strategic planning process led to the identification of four core areas which represent our largest areas of service:
• Birth to 3 Services –early intervention, toddler programs, parent support
• Preschool/Kindergarten – integrated, co-located and independent programs
• Mainstream Services – itinerant, consulting, school district collaborations, teleservices
• Professional Training - conferences, teacher training, webinars

As a result of the strategic planning process, Clarke has gone through a period of extraordinary innovation and expansion, positioning the organization to continue to thrive well into the future. The following is a summary of accomplishments to date:

Reaching children early: Clarke more than tripled the number of children served in home-and center-based settings during what is the most critical phase of language development for children—birth to age three. This time is when the foundation for listening and spoken language is built.

Increasing access for children and families: Clarke developed the tVISIT program, now the largest program of its kind in the US, providing infants, toddlers and their families with services and coaching via live interactive video sessions. Clarke experts can now serve children virtually anywhere.

Growing mainstream services: Clarke has quadrupled the number of mainstream students and teachers served by our professionals. Clarke teachers of the deaf are present in neighborhood schools throughout Massachusetts and Pennsylvania to support children with hearing loss as they learn alongside their peers with typical hearing. Clarke is now the largest nonprofit provider of mainstream services for children who are deaf or hard of hearing in the country. Within the past three years, children who have been served in their classrooms by a Clarke Teacher of the Deaf through the Mainstream Services program have matriculated at a rate of 100%.

Expanding Clarke's presence: In addition to established locations in Florida, Massachusetts, New York and Pennsylvania, Clarke also began regularly serving children in Delaware, New Jersey, Rhode Island and many other areas around the country. Clarke also established a new state-of-the-art preschool on the campus of La Salle University in Philadelphia.

Spearheading model inclusion programs: Clarke co-located its kindergarten through 8th grade program within a Northampton, MA public school. Students learn and play alongside their peers with typical hearing, and gain experience that will facilitate their transition to a mainstream classroom setting. Additionally, Clarke designed and launched an innovative regional program for students with hearing loss in partnership with Hampshire Regional High School.

Strong child outcomes: Using Preschool Language Scale (PLS) and the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test to assess our children's outcomes, during the grant period more than 80% of Clarke's preschool scored at or above the median score in auditory comprehension, expressive communication, and total language and more than 90% scored at or above the median standard for the picture vocabulary test. Median scores reflect the average scores for children with typical hearing.

Training professionals: Clarke and Fontbonne University have partnered to offer a Master of Arts in Deaf Education where students will receive hands-on training at Clarke locations.

External Reviews

Financials

Clarke School for the Deaf

Fiscal year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Need more info?

FREE: Gain immediate access to the following:

  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2016, 2016 and 2015
A Pro report is also available for this organization for $125.
Click here to see what's included.

Board Leadership Practices

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?

Yes

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?

Yes

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

No

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?

Yes

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?

Yes

Organizational Demographics

In order to support nonprofits and gain valuable insight for the sector, GuideStar worked with D5—a five-year initiative to advance diversity, equity, and inclusion in philanthropy—in creating a questionnaire. This section is a voluntary questionnaire that empowers organizations to share information on the demographics of who works in and leads organizations. To protect the identity of individuals, we do not display sexual orientation or disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff. Any values displayed in this section are percentages of the total number of individuals in each category (e.g. 20% of all Board members for X organization are female).

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Gender

This organization reports that it does not collect this information for Full-Time Staff and Part-Time Staff.

Race & Ethnicity

This organization reports that it does not collect this information for Board Members, Senior Staff, Full-Time Staff and Part-Time Staff.

Sexual Orientation

This organization reports that it does not collect this information for Board Members, Senior Staff, Full-Time Staff and Part-Time Staff.

Disability

This organization reports that it does not collect this information for Board Members, Senior Staff, Full-Time Staff and Part-Time Staff.

Diversity Strategies

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We track retention of staff, board, and volunteers across demographic categories
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We track income levels of staff, senior staff, and board across demographic categories
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We track the age of staff, senior staff, and board
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We track the diversity of vendors (e.g., consultants, professional service firms)
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We have a diversity committee in place
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We have a diversity manager in place
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We have a diversity plan
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We use other methods to support diversity
Diversity notes from the nonprofit
The Board is comprised of business and civic leaders as well as alumni and relatives of current and former students. Historically, election to the Board of Trustees is made after a vetting process has been completed. Potential candidates to the Board are put into nomination by a current Trustee or a member of Clarke's Senior Leadership team but without notice to the candidate(s). Prospective candidates are cultivated and invited to be on a committee as a means of educating them on Clarke: this has also been an excellent means of assessing whether the candidate honors the time and participation aspects of committee work, as well as to judge whether the skills, experience, networks and personality of the candidate will further the mission of the organization and be of benefit to the dynamic and diversity of the Board itself. Clarke is an equal opportunity employer, and as such affirms that it does not discriminate on the basis of ethnicity, race, gender, sexual orientation, creed, disability, philosophy, veteran status, marital status or any other basis prohibited by applicable law in either internal policies and procedures or external policies and procedures.