PLATINUM2023

United Way of Tri County Inc.

Helping Those Most in Need

aka UWTC   |   Framingham, MA   |  www.uwotc.org

Mission

United Way Of Tri-County 's Mission is to increase the organized capacity of people to care for one another.

Ruling year info

1960

President & CEO

Paul Mina

Main address

46 Park Street

Framingham, MA 01702 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

04-2104231

NTEE code info

Fund Raising Organizations That Cross Categories includes Community Funds/Trusts and Federated Giving Programs) e.g. United Way (T70)

Human Services - Multipurpose and Other N.E.C. (P99)

Personal Social Services (P50)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2022, 2021 and 2021.
Register now

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

This profile needs more info.

If it is your nonprofit, add a problem overview.

Login and update

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Basic Human Needs

The United Way of Tri-County seeks to increase it's funding base address high priority needs. UWOTC focuses on Feeding the hungry through it's 3 UWOTC owned & operated food pantries and 2 community cafe's. We also run Mass 2-1-1/Call2talk, a free 24/7 state-side information and referral/mental health suicide prevention service. UWOTC also provides funds to community organizations that offer programs that meet the two categories of need, "Keeping Kids On Track" and provide a "Community Safety Net".

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth
Ethnic and racial groups

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Estimated dollar value of food donations distributed to community feedings programs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Over $4.5 million dollars worth of Food was distributed in 2022 by UWOTC through our 3 UWOTC owned & operated food pantries an 2 Community Cafe's that served over 35,000 hot meals in valued at $157K

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our organization in addition to funding other agencies to address community need is a "Direct Service Provider" working on 5 primary goals:

1. Feeding The Hungry (through our 3 UWOTC owned & operated food pantries & 2 Community Cafe's)
2. Providing a Free 24/7 Information & Referral Hotline (Mass2-1-1 which we house, manage and founded in the in
Massachusetts in 2006)
3. Addressing Mental Health/Suicide Prevention Issues through our (Call2talk 24/7 Hotline)
4. Provide residents of the Metrowest/495 Corridor with free household items through our United Way Warehouse
Store)
5. Building additional financial & human resources that are renewable and sustainable as part of our capacity building efforts.

Continuing to seek grants, corporate giving and sponsorships as part of our capacity building efforts. Engaging in a more strategic way our Board and individual donors of high net worth so that they are vested and involved in our capacity building efforts.

Vigorously seek and obtain local, state and federal program grants for food security and ou 2 help lines.

Expand food security and I & R services to an additional 5-10 communities through our "Gus the Grocery Bus" mobile service center.

Gain added exposure and public relations benefit from our new on site Community Garden that we are creating with the Metrowest Regional Transit uthority.

We have the ability to implement and apply for the above through our staff Team which now includes a new Grant Writer. Our lobbying efforts by management of the State & Federal funding departments is on point and in place.

We've received several grants for Food Security, Capacity Building, Mass2-1-1 and Call2Talk.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We share the feedback we received with the people we serve, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time, It is difficult to get honest feedback from the people we serve

Financials

United Way of Tri County Inc.
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

United Way of Tri County Inc.

Board of directors
as of 04/18/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

MS. Ellen McGovern

Clinton Savings Bank


Board co-chair

MS. Larissa Thurston

St. Mary's Credit Union

Term: 2023 - 2024

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 4/14/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person with a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 04/14/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.