Interfaith Social Services Inc.

Neighbors helping neighbors

Quincy, MA   |  www.interfaithsocialservices.org

Mission

Mission: Interfaith Social Services compassionately provides our community with the resources necessary to sustain a healthy and fulfilling life. We are committed to alleviating hunger, providing mental health counseling, supporting children and families, and preventing homelessness. Vision: An empowered community where everyone’s fundamental human needs are met. Governing Principles / Values: Promote an inclusive culture where our clients, donors, volunteers, staff and community partners feel the utmost dignity, RESPECT and compassion. COLLABORATE with other local organizations to form partnerships and foster a sense of community. Nurture COMMUNITY involvement through volunteerism. Act as conscientious STEWARDS for all donations that we receive.

Ruling year info

1968

Executive Director

Mr. Rick Doane

Main address

105 Adams Street

Quincy, MA 02169 USA

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Formerly known as

Protestant Social Service Bureau

EIN

04-2104853

NTEE code info

Personal Social Services (P50)

Food Banks, Food Pantries (K31)

Mental Health Treatment (F30)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Interfaith Social Services aspires to eliminate hunger, mental illness, and poverty in the communities that we serve. We seek to address the emergency needs of the clients that we as well as their emotional and psychological needs. • Thousands of South Shore residents struggle to provide basic necessities for their families. • Many local residents cannot afford treatment for their mental illness and/or addiction recovery. • Too many households face the tragedy of homelessness each year because we live in one of the most challenging rental markets in the country. • Each year supermarkets discard an absurd amount of food that is perfectly fit for human consumption. • Local residents yearn for a place where they make a significant impact serving their neighbors in need.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Career Closet

Interfaith Social Services' Career Closet program provides free professional attire to low-income job seekers. Interfaith's volunteers help clients choose several outfits to wear to job interview or for a new employment. A local spa partners with Interfaith to offer a complimentary hair cut and style immediately before the interview. This program helps people dress for success and it gives them a boost of self-esteem to help secure employment. This program allows families and individuals to break cycles of poverty. Interfaith developed the Career Closet because we wanted to do something to help the unemployed and underemployed in our service area. Although there are a number of job training programs as well as a career center in our area, no one was providing professional clothing to job seekers. After consulting with other local organizations, we created the Career Closet.Local community groups, career centers, job training programs and homeless shelters refer individuals who are actively seeking employment to Interfaith's Career Closet program.

Population(s) Served
Adults

The Pantry Shelf is one of the largest food pantries in Greater Boston. The program provides free groceries for economically disadvantaged families and individuals in ten towns on Boston's South Shore. The ten towns are Quincy, Braintree, Cohasset, Hingham, Holbrook, Hull, Milton, Randolph, Scituate and Weymouth. ThePantry Shelf is open five mornings a week as well as the third Tuesday evening and the third Saturday morning of each month. These evening and weekend hours are designed to assist the working poor. The majority of our clientsare currently unemployed, and for many we are their only source of supplemental food. At Thanksgiving, Interfaith distributes meal baskets to its food pantry clients; we distribute Easter baskets to the children of food pantry clients; and we sponsor an adopt-a-family program to ensure that the children of food pantry clients receive Christmas gifts.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Interfaith Social Services' HomeSafe program provides emergency financial assistance to disadvantaged families and individuals for past due rent, electricity, gas, and oil for heat during the winter. HomeSafe also makes financial awards for certain medical expenses not covered by Medicare and Medicaid, such as hearing aids and dental work. HomeSafe also has a special initiative called Fresh Start which helps transition families out of shelters into more permanent affordable housing. We complete a thorough phone intake for every client who calls our program. In addition, we run a basic budget to assess whether a household can sustain its housing and utilities bills after receiving our award. If sustainability is evident, the client must complete an application form and return documents proving residency, income and past due balances. If an award is approved, we use a client's budget information to calculate reasonable awards that will most likely result in successful outcomes.

Population(s) Served
Adults

The New Directions Counseling Center offers counseling and psychotherapy services regardless of ability to pay. Although insurance is accepted, there is a flexible sliding scale based on income for those individuals without coverage. Eight skilled and empathic professionals with over 200 years of combined experience staff this program. Despite the mandate for health insurance in Massachusetts, about 130,000 people are still not able to carry it. A second differentiator of New Directions is that first appointments are made very quickly Our goal is to return initial calls within 24 hours and to schedule the first appointment within a week, often in a day or two. This is a crucial time for a person who is reaching out for help; it is therapeutic to start counseling when an individual is motivated and ready. New Directions Counseling Center also oversees Interfaith's chaplaincy at Quincy Medical Center which delivers counseling to patients and grieving families.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Interfaith Social Services' Bureau Drawer Thrift Shop provides the community with an affordable option for clothing and household items. Our Thrift Shop is run entirely by volunteers. A team of 35 regularly-returningvolunteers sort donations, stock shelves and assist customers. More than 8,500 bags of merchandise were donated last year. Since the merchandise and labor are all donated toour organization it means that 100% of the Bureau Drawer's sales help support Interfaith's human service programs. The Bureau Drawer Thrift Shop also serves a charitable function. When a program manager from one the other branches of our organization learns that a client needs clothing or household items but can't afford them, we issue them a gift certificate to use in our Thrift Shop.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Affiliations & memberships

AFP (Association of Fundraising Professionals) 2004

South Shore Chamber of Commerce 2006

Quincy Chamber of Commerce 2010

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Total pounds of food rescued

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Pantry Shelf

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Half of all food distributed through our pantry comes in the form of rescue or salvage from local supermarkets. Our staff and volunteers make daily and weekly pickups at over a dozen partners.

Number of therapy hours provided to clients

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Economically disadvantaged people, Substance abusers

Related Program

New Directions Counseling Center

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The majority of these counseling sessions are provided to clients with no place else to turn for assistance.

Number of families assisted with rent or mortgage to avoid eviction

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

HomeSafe

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Pounds of clothing donated

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Bureau Drawer thrift shop

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

These are pounds of clothing and household goods donated to our Bureau Drawer Thrift Shop. Each donated bag weighs approximately 18 pounds.

Bags of food distributed to food pantry clients

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Seniors, Families

Related Program

Pantry Shelf

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Hours of volunteer service

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of children served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Pantry Shelf

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of diapers distributed to clients

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Infants and toddlers, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Pantry Shelf

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Vision:
An empowered community where everyone’s fundamental human needs are met.

Governing Principles / Values:
Promote an inclusive culture where our clients, donors, volunteers, staff and community partners feel the utmost dignity, RESPECT and compassion. COLLABORATE with other local organizations to form partnerships and foster a sense of community. Nurture COMMUNITY involvement through volunteerism. Act as conscientious STEWARDS for all donations that we receive.

Interfaith Social Services operates one of the largest emergency food programs in Greater Boston. Each year thousands of families and children depend on Interfaith’s programs to put food on their tables.

Our New Directions Counseling Center is a safety net for anyone living with mental illness or an addiction diagnosis. Most of our referrals come from other counseling centers in the region. Families and individuals are referred to our counseling center when they don’t have health insurance, when they have exorbitant out of pocket deductible plans, or when the wait time is too long elsewhere. Interfaith is there to make sure that no one falls through the cracks.

Interfaith’s HomeSafe program prevents homelessness for hundreds of people every year. We step in to help prevent evictions or the loss of a basic utility. We work with landlords and utility companies. We advocate on behalf of our clients, conducting budget counseling with them in addition to financial assistance.

Interfaith’s food salvage program rescues hundreds of thousands of pounds of food each year that would otherwise have entered the waste stream. We make sure that this perfectly good food makes it onto the tables of our food pantry clients instead of filling up dumpsters or the compost facilities.

Volunteers are the heart and soul of Interfaith Social Services. Our organization has become a regional center for volunteering and community engagement. Each year hundreds of local volunteers from the community and from local businesses serve within our programs. Over 20,000 hours of service are given each year. This grassroots support allows us to focus our resources on our programs instead of overhead.

For the past seven decades our community has sustained Interfaith’s efforts. In addition to financial donations from individuals and foundations Interfaith has a robust diversity of funding sources:

The majority of our counseling clients do not have health insurance. However, a percentage of them do have insurance. The payments that we receive from their providers are an important source of income for the program.

Interfaith’s Bureau Drawer Thrift Shop has given the community an affordable option to purchase clothing and home goods for the past 40 years, it is also one of our most important fundraisers. The shop is entirely run by volunteers. This lack of overhead ensures that the proceeds go directly to funding our various programs.

Interfaith’s food rescue program not only salvages food from local supermarkets it also allows us to keep our food costs significantly lower than organizations that are serving a comparable number of clients, while distributing even more food to them.

We are supported by an amazing board of directors with a sincere connection to our mission. They are diverse, both racially and socioeconomically. Some of our board members have been program volunteers for decades and bring an incredible wealth of institutional knowledge to the team.

Since 1947 our organization has grown into a regional center for social services and community engagement. We provide assistance to thousands of local families every year. Our programs exemplify the ideal of neighbors helping neighbors; each year hundreds of community members, businesses and civic groups volunteer within our programs. They serve side by side to help their neighbors in need.

Over seven decades our programs were housed in various offices and venues around the city of Quincy, Massachusetts. Since the early 2000’s our programs have been consolidated at our offices near Quincy Center. We own our building and have made significant investments over the past 10 years including a new roof, new stucco exterior, new windows, etc.

Our programs have grown significantly over the past decade. In the past decade, we have seen the number of food pantry clients in need of food assistance climb from 10,000 per year to more than 23,000. In the same time period, the New Directions Counseling Center has gone from providing 1,900 counseling sessions to more than 2,500 sessions per year. As programs have expanded, the need for facility improvements has become apparent.

In 2019 we completed a capital campaign to: 1) purchase a new truck for our food pantry, 2) build a walk-in freezer and 3) add additional office spaces for our counseling program.

We see ourselves as ambassadors for our clients. Over the coming years one of our priorities is to tell their stories, be their spokespeople and help break down stigmas and stereotypes that prevent others from reaching out for assistance.

In the coming years we expect to expand our service area to include more communities in our region and market our services to communities that are underutilizing our resources

We would love to establish more passive income businesses to fund our services, much like our Thrift Shop. Perhaps a laundromat or other store where we could refer clients who are in need of services while also receiving income from regular customers who utilize the business.

We will continue to look for opportunities to collaborate and strengthen partnerships with more organizations in the community.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person),

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    Collecting data from all participants is a challenge. We engage interpreters.,

Financials

Interfaith Social Services Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Interfaith Social Services Inc.

Board of directors
as of 5/12/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Gabe Arato

Children's Hospital

Term: 2020 - 2022

Cynthia Lee

Maggie Trudel

Community Volunteer

Sandy Jonhson

Randolph Senior Center

Jim Thorne

Retired

Gabriel Arato

Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts

Bernard Dasilva

Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts

Russell Goodman

Community Volunteer

Bill Turpie

Community Volunteer

Peter Lung

South Shore Bank

Stephen Greene

Automotive Consultant

Allison Idris

Architectural Designer

Bill Swanson

Independent Investor

Gillian Grossman

Community Volunteer

Jay Marvin

Sodexo

Tom Dinneen

JPMorgan Chase

Silvana Zakrzewski

Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts

Terrel Harris

Media Communications Specialist

Barbara Caron

Community Volunteer

Eric Brown

BlumShapiro

Nancy Powers

Legal and Law Enforcement Official State of Massachusetts

Judy Kiley

Community Volunteer

Rhonda Prokos

Arbella Insurance Group

Anna Marie Conneely

DIH Technology Co.

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 05/12/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 05/12/2021

Policies and practices developed in partnership with Equity in the Center, a project that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems within the social sector to increase racial equity. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.