Cooperative Production, Inc.

Focusing on individual needs and helping people realize their dreams since 1972

aka CO-OP   |   North Dighton, MA   |  http://www.cooperativeproduction.org

Mission

The purpose of CO-OP is to support people with developmental and other disabilities, including brain injuries, to become valued members of their communities, with opportunities for meaningful participation in areas of personal pursuit.

Ruling year info

1976

President & CEO

Michael Cancilliere MBA

Main address

455 Somerset Ave PO Box 506

North Dighton, MA 02764 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

04-2588140

NTEE code info

Developmentally Disabled Services/Centers (P82)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Residential Services

Residents enjoy a comfortable, secure home life and are provided with creative opportunities to fully participate in their respective communities. Shared responsibilities, social and recreational activities, and valued relationships all contribute to making
a house a home; as do the varied levels of staff
assistance and skills training that are provided to

Population(s) Served
Adults

CO-OP’s various day programs offer services for people with diverse interests and support needs. Individualized services include interest-based choices for skill-building and personal development, with daily activities focusing on community participation through recreational, social, and volunteer opportunities:
• Community-Based Day Programs
Offer a host of activities and skills training for individuals whose interests may or may not include employment. With an emphasis on personal vision and goals, services promote independence and self-esteem through meaningful involvement in our local communities.
• Day Habilitation Programs
Funded by MassHealth, CO-OP’s CARF accredited day habilitation programs offer an additional menu of services to individuals, many of whom may require more intensive and structured levels of support. Many individuals in these programs rely on our comprehensive menu of health care and clinical services to maintain their optimum health and physical well-being.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Meaningful employment is important to people of all abilities. Relying on decades of experience and trusted relationships with local business partners, CO-OP’s job placement services creatively provide full- and part-time job opportunities that draw upon individual strengths and interests and accommodate
each person’s support needs. Additional services include assessments, job exploration and coaching, and ongoing support.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Skilled and caring healthcare professionals oversee a wide array of health and wellness services, including the management and distribution of medication and implementation of treatment protocols for people
with complex medical needs. These same support services allow many individuals to attend CO-OP’s
day programs who would have otherwise remained at home. On-site nursing coverage is available at our day
program locations and assigned residences. On-call nursing support is available in all agency programs.

Population(s) Served
Adults

A variety of clinical services such as speech and communication, occupational and physical therapies, and positive behavioral supports are available to help individuals fully participate in their daily routines and local communities.

Additional supports include assessment and evaluation, service plan development, and treatment plan implementation. CO-OP also coordinates the acquisition of needed resources, equipment, and technology such as electronic communication devices and other alternatives for people with limited expressive speech capabilities.

Population(s) Served
Adults

For many people, blending an array of different service options is the best approach for creating their own customized service plan. Whether it’s working part-time and enjoying the recreational activities offered through our Community-Based Day Programs or participating in the agency’s self-employment component while receiving important health care services, CO-OP has the flexibility and resources to accommodate a variety of goals and interests.

Population(s) Served
Adults

CO-OP welcomes adults looking to improve quality of life through individual, person-centered activities and supports. CO-OP Milestones offers an array of interest-based social and recreational activities for mind and body, along with clinical and therapeutic services. Plus, CO-OP offers individualized supplemental support including transitional assistance, peer support, prevocational services, and supported employment.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Accreditations

Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities 2021

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of adults who receive day services (day habilitation, blended community-based day services and day hab supports)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, People with disabilities

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of clients in residential care

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, People with disabilities

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Overall strategic goals: CO-OP is committed to organically expanding its service offerings in the next ten years to a wider variety of individuals in need of assistance. Using our existing services as a starting point, CO-OP board members and executives plan to diversify further into related services such as Acquired Brain Injury and expanded day services, siting new programs as well as growing other current services to meet the additional needs of individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities. In addition, CO-OP will strengthen internal and external communications and fundraising capacity to increase fund development and agency reach.

1) Strengthen quality assurance systems; 2) develop 5-year property plan; 3) align current services in concert with funding source preferences and trends; 4) develop targeted marketing for specific programs; 5) address clinical and healthcare resource needs; 6) develop a multi-year plan for service expansion; 7) ensure efficiency through enhanced technology and reporting; 8) balance staff needs and professional development with refined HR policies; 9) strengthen relationships and agency work through consistent marketing, communications, and development efforts; 10) refine information database for audience segmentation; 11) expand stakeholder list; 12) refine messaging and promotions relating to recruiting; 13) develop viable succession strategies for future leadership positions; 14) build a diversified, committed pool of highly qualified applicants to serve on CO-OP board

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    SMS text surveys, Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    We are expanding access to WiFi and technology in several areas in response to requests made by the people we serve.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    We believe in person-centered services, so ensuring we ask for feedback keeps our services centered squarely on the people we serve.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback,

Financials

Cooperative Production, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Cooperative Production, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 08/18/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Raymond Pelote

Wynn & Wynn, P.C.

Term: 2019 - 2022

Darlene Boroviak

Professor Emerita, Wheaton College

Russ Latham

Educator (retired)

Micheal Browner

Consultant

Paul Hodge

Probation Officer (retired)

Raymond Pelote

CO-OP Chair of the Board, Wynn & Wynn, PC

Jacqueline Scungio

Providence Community Health Centers

Jeff Morse

CFO, Retired

John McCaul

Taunton Town Council

Michael Cancilliere

CO-OP President & CEO

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 1/28/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Asian American/Pacific Islanders/Asian
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data