Dorchester Bay Economic Development Corporation

aka Dorchester Bay EDC   |   Dorchester, MA   |  www.dbedc.org

Mission

Dorchester Bay Economic Development Corporation acts to build a strong, thriving, and diverse community in Boston's Dorchester neighborhoods. Working closely with neighborhoods, residents, businesses and partners, we access resources to: Develop and preserve home ownership and rental housing across income levels;Create and sustain economic development opportunities for businesses and individuals; andBuild community through organizing, civic engagement, and leadership development.

Ruling year info

1980

Chief Executive Officer

Ms. Kimberly R Lyle

Main address

594 Columbia Road Suite 304

Dorchester, MA 02125 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

04-2681632

NTEE code info

Community, Neighborhood Development, Improvement (S20)

Housing Development, Construction, Management (L20)

Crime Prevention N.E.C. (I20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Boston is among the most racially segregated and unequal cities in the U.S. The median net worth of white families is 30,000 times that of black families. The city is experiencing rapid growth that threatens to increase financial instability and displacement for Boston’s lowest-income residents. Dorchester Bay (DBEDC) is in the heart of the Uphams Corner neighborhood in Boston. Uphams Corner and surrounding neighborhoods are microcosms of racial inequality experiencing higher poverty, unemployment, and housing cost burden rates than Boston overall. The majority of residents in many neighborhoods we serve are people of color. Many of the small businesses in our service area are also at risk of being displaced. Development and displacement pressures create great need but also tremendous opportunity. DBEDC works to create effective pathways to economic and social mobility and sustainability for Boston’s lowest-income residents during a period of rapid development.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

1.) Housing & Commercial Development

Dorchester Bay EDC is involved in a broad community effort to promote revitalization in Grove Hall's Quincy Corridor. The Quincy Corridor Transformation Project includes affordable housing, two new job centers, new resident services, asset building, and job training. The projects include: Preservation and redevelopment of 129 units of affordable housing, including substantial renovation of 80 units and development of 49 new units to improve the living conditions of multiple families; Redevelopment of the 2-acre Pearl Meats site into a small business food processing center, creating over 150 needed jobs to the community; A new 22,000 sf light industrial artisans' collaborative, where artists and crafts people rent time on machines (feasibility stage); Integration of green/sustainable design strategies into every aspect of the redevelopment effort; and Public infrastructure improvements for traffic calming, pedestrian safety, and public transportation access to the neighborhood.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

Tenant Organizing builds active tenant associations to promote leadership and tackle critical issues, such as crime and local development. Broader Community Organizing facilitates local crime watch groups and issue coalitions so residents take control of their own streets, safety, and quality of life. Youth Leadership and Development engages youth in education, recreation, leadership and community service. Technology Centers & Workforce Development: Youth and families can attend Basic, Beginners and Intermediate technology classes. One of the 5 DBEDC technology centers provides GED prep. Rock and Roll Seniors supports elders by offering community-based enrichment and educational programming, case management services and intervention/referrals. Dorchester Bay Re-entry Program is the first CDC-based re-entry program for ex-offenders returning to their community. With over 80 ex-offenders served each year, almost half have secured employment, with only 6% recidivism since 2009.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

The DBEDC Small Business Program was launched in 1992 to stabilize the local business community by assisting entrepreneurs and making loans to preserve and expand their business. We provide Technical Assistance, micro and small business loans from $500.00-$250K, and real estate & equipment loans (504 loans) for often unbankable local business owners and start-ups. We are a registered Community Development Finance Institution and the only CDC-based direct small business lender in Boston. Since our inception, $6M has been lent either directly or in participation loans, and 700+ jobs were created or preserved. We also provide home improvement loans, deleading loans, and foreclosure assistance to keep over 350 owners in their homes. While focused on Dorchester and surrounding low- to moderate- income areas in Boston, we have now expanded to encompass all of Boston and beyond.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

Youth Force exists to develop teens who have the skills, knowledge and motivation to make positive changes in their communities. We train low-income teens of color in the Dorchester, Roxbury and Mattapan areas in leadership, community organizing and civic engagement, and then engage them in community change around issues they choose. Our programs: Youth Force Core Leaders - 10 teens hired by DB to work 10hrs/wk as organizers and lead all Youth Force-related trainings/campaigns;Youth Leadership Institute (YLI) - A 3-week, 6-session training program on leadership skills, run by Youth Force core leaders; Youth Jobs Campaign - A youth-led campaign focused on winning increased access to quality teen employment opportunities.; and School Civic Engagement Project - Teens at BPS schools, charter schools and private schools trained in the importance of civic engagement, key civic engagement skills and engaged in civic engagement campaigns to improve their community

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

Dorchester Bay works closely with ex-offenders, 18-26 years in age and mostly from Dorchester, to help them develop the skills, inner strength and attitude to become productive and contributing members of the community, taking responsibility for their actions and effects. In addition, we emphasize strong mentoring and the strength of our relationship with the client. This program has exceeded expectations in job placement, housing assistance and reducing recidivism. DB helped these men become responsible for themselves and often for their families. Unfortunately, without help many of these young men would enter the ""revolving door"" where incarceration leads to unemployment, and the ensuing poverty often leads to reoffending. The effect of this goes beyond the men and their families. It has ramifications for the community's safety and the persistence of poverty. Our Reentry Program provides support, direction and job services to ex-offenders returning to our neighborhood.

Population(s) Served
Incarcerated people
Economically disadvantaged people

Where we work

Accreditations

Community Development Financial Institutions Fund of the United States Department of the Treasury 2006

Community Housing Development Organization - U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development 2006

United States Small Business Administration - 8(a) Business Development 2009

US Department of Housing and Urban Development 2009

Awards

Choice Neighborhood Award - Quincy Corridor Project $12.3M out of $20M awarded to City of Boston 2011

Department of Housing & Urban Development

Sustainable communities Pilot/ 1 of 5 in the United States 2011

Dept. Housing & Urban Development, Environmental Protection Agency, Dept. of Transportation

HUD Community Challenge Grant Award - Fairmount/Indigo Line CDC Collaborative helped City to win $1.8M 2011

Department of Housing & Urban Development

Ricanne Hadrian Award for Excellence 2010

Massachusetts Association of Community Development Corporations

Excellence in Collaboration Award for the Fairmount CDC Rail Line Collaborative 2009

Massachusetts Nonprofit Network

Citation from Governor Deval Patrick recognizing 30 yrs. of service 2009

Commonwealth of Massachusetts

Reader's Choice Award for the Dudley Village Project 2008

Affordable Housing Finance Magazine

Community, Academia & Non-Profit Organization Environmental Merit Award 2008

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

Honorable Mention as Outstanding Planning Project for "Boston's Newest Smart Growth Corridor" by the Fairmount/Indigo Line CDC Collaborative 2006

American Planning Association

Recognition in top 10 of all its affiliates for organizational and programmatic excellence 2006

United Way of Massachusetts Bay

Region 1 (New England) "Phoenix Award" for Excellence in Brownfield Redevelopment 2004

Environmental Protection Agency

CDFI Fund Award for $1.2MM 2013

U.S. Treasury Department

MetLife Foundation Community-Police Partnership Award 2014

LISC/MetLife Foundation

Affiliations & memberships

AFP (Association of Fundraising Professionals) 2010

Citizens’ Housing and Planning Association 2000

Massachusetts Association of Community Development Corporations (MACDC) 1990

United Way Member Agency 1990

Urban Land Institute - Member 2000

CDC - State certified Community Development Corporation 2013

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of jobs created and maintained

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

2.) Small Business Lending

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Total number of Mircofinance partners

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

2.) Small Business Lending

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of microloan borrowers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

2.) Small Business Lending

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of loaned made to businesses

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

2.) Small Business Lending

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Total dollars loaned to businesses

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

2.) Small Business Lending

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of computer literacy/skills/technology courses conducted

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

3.) Resident Initiatives and Community Organizing (RICO)

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of attendees present at rallies/events

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

At-risk youth

Related Program

4.) Youth Force (YF)

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Dorchester Bay (DBEDC) is striving toward an equitable Dorchester. We’re fighting for a Dorchester that will see more affordable housing, allowing families to remain in their neighborhoods.

We’re pushing for affordable commercial space that gives small businesses – many of them owned by immigrants and people who speak a primary language other than English – a chance to remain and grow.

We’re aiming to achieve a vision of equity that centers current residents from historically marginalized groups, helps them to build economic and social power, and creates vehicles for them to remain and thrive in their neighborhoods.

We’re ensuring that DBEDC is a strong, nimble, and sustainable organization with the infrastructure and capacities to achieve our vision and fortifying our viability for the next generation.

Through a holistic, equitable approach to community development, Dorchester Bay (DBEDC) will achieve this vision by:

– Increasing the supply of housing affordable to a range of individuals and families that contributes to neighborhood stability, and that the DBEDC portfolio of properties continues to meet the highest standards of excellence, serving the needs of existing residents for quality, safe, affordable, and stable housing.

– Fostering economic development in Dorchester by developing and managing commercial real estate properties that are assets to the community, and by increasing the number of vibrant and growing small businesses that align with community needs.

– Increasing engagement with art and culture as catalysts for community building and economic growth.

– Building the leadership and level of political power among lower and moderate-income residents in DBEDC housing and in the broader community.

– Increasing public policy advocacy and engagement in civic affairs among residents in Dorchester Bay housing and the broader community that results in positive, localized neighborhood impact.

– Increasing economic self-sufficiency through livable wage jobs and sustainable employment.

– Developing and retaining a diverse staff with the necessary professional capacities, create an inclusive culture, and foster cross-departmental initiatives.

– Continuing to develop an engaged, informed, and active Board of Directors that offers strategic leadership and strives for excellence in governance.

– Strengthening DBEDC financially, with diverse revenue streams sufficient to meet the goals of the organization, a risk management system, and high-quality asset management systems.
– Raising the visibility and profile of DBEDC in the community and with stakeholders through effective outreach and communication.

– Strengthening systems for effective outcome measurement including technology, staff skills, and the capacity for data collection, analysis, and reflection to support program and organizational improvements.

Dorchester Bay has identified strategies for achieving its vision of an equitable Dorchester:

– Continue to serve Dorchester’s low-income residents while expanding rental housing opportunities to middle and moderate-income residents.

– Contribute to the stability of the local Dorchester economy by providing homeownership opportunities for low- and moderate-income families.

– Identify new pipeline projects to continue Dorchester Bay’s housing production and preservation pace of one project per year.

– Provide high-quality services to residents that support their needs and promote stable tenancies.

– Develop commercial real estate as a vehicle for economic development and permanent job creation.

– Identify a framework for developing effective job training programming and skills credentialing opportunities for low-income and moderate-income residents.

– Bolster our neighborhood loan fund to provide more money to lend to area businesses, to invest in DBEDC projects, and to launch new initiatives.

– Increase access to active recreation and public transportation through partnerships.

– Establish a leadership training program paired with civic action. Develop the framework and the resources for a comprehensive and well-integrated civic engagement initiative.

– Partner with local and statewide coalitions, networks, and advocacy organizations to advance issues that will have a positive impact on the neighborhood.

– Support leadership growth and increasing meaningful leadership roles within DBEDC and in the broader community. Support leadership growth and increasing meaningful leadership roles for youth.

– Use DBEDC’s housing developments as a health care tool.

– Launch a financial skill and asset-building program for adults and for youth.

– Expand Board representation to reflect the diversity of the Dorchester community, including business owners and neighborhood residents. Develop Board’s capacity to rigorously review policies programs, finances and executive performance in the context of the strategic plan.

Dorchester Bay (DBEDC) approaches its goals and strategies from a healthy financial and organizational position. DBEDC has a positive reputation among residents, community organizations, local area businesses, city and state government, federal government partners, building trades professionals, and in the broader community development field.

DBEDC is a respected leader in community real estate development. We are known for leading projects that are inclusive of local residents and exceed city local and minority hiring requirements.

In addition, DBEDC has an engaged and committed staff of professionals from diverse backgrounds. Many of our staff are residents of the neighborhoods we serve. Our staff is diverse across race, ethnicity, gender, place of birth, primary language, educational and economic background.

Our strong financial position, expertise in real estate development, reputation as an innovative and creative developer, and our staff which reflects that diversity of the communities we serve ensure that we have the capability and will to make good on our vision of equitable community development.

We are making significant progress toward achieving our goals. Specifically, we have:

– Pursued funding for the redevelopment of a project that will retain affordable housing in Uphams Corner.

– Initiated the process for developing affordable housing for seniors and aging residents.

– Implemented project selection criteria in evaluating all new real estate projects to ensure alignment with our vision for holistic, equitable development

– Completed a 5-year capitalization plan to bolster our small business loan fund; the plan is in its second year of implementation and we have already secured investments from a variety of sources.

– Developed a marketing plan and culturally resonant marketing materials to raise awareness of our lending products and to reach small business owners and potential entrepreneurs in low-to-moderate income communities.

– Through the advocacy of teens from our youth leadership development program, DBEDC helped to pass a criminal justice reform bill which raised the age of criminal responsibility from age 7 to 12 and established a process for juveniles and young adults to expunge crimes from their records that are no longer prosecuted as crimes in Massachusetts.

– Established the I.D.E.A. Committee (Inclusion, Diversity, Equity, and Advocacy), a body comprised of DBEDC staff who make recommendations and implement policies to establish equity in DBEDC’s hiring practices, expand access to professional development opportunities, and foster an inclusive and accepting organizational culture.

– Conducted a thorough risk assessment analysis and implemented systems and procedures for improving the transparency of the organization’s finances and administrative procedures.

Building on our initial success in achieving our strategic priorities and goals, we are continuing our work to ensure a vision of equity in Dorchester. Specifically:

– We are in the final stages of building out an Economic Mobility Agenda that will create access to living wage jobs, financial literacy for adults and youth, additional technical assistance for existing and prospective small business owners, and pathways to self-sufficiency for low-income families living in affordable housing.

– We expect to begin development of the Indigo Block project which will bring 80 units of mixed-income housing including 4 two-family homes and 20,000 square feet of light industrial space to the area.

– We are entering the next phase of our 5-year capitalization plan which will grow our loan fund.

– We are transforming the Classical Revival Pierce Building from underutilized to a community anchor for the neighborhood. Retail space on the ground floor for local businesses will draw people to the center of the district. A creative businesses incubator will help to start and grow local creative businesses and increase business ownership among people of color and women.

Financials

Dorchester Bay Economic Development Corporation
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
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  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Dorchester Bay Economic Development Corporation

Board of directors
as of 07/02/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Paul Black

Maria Andrade

Mujeres Unido - Accountant

Lorraine Payne-Wheeler

Rosalyn Johnson

Community Volunteer

Eileen Kenner

Retired

Paul Black

Santander Bank

Kristen Halbert

Derek McCleary

TD Bank

Derrick Bellinger

An Duong

Ricky Ochillo

Leighton Richardson

Mary Walker

Brian Welch

Daryl Wright

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? No
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 7/2/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American/African
Gender identity
Female
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 01/18/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Policies and processes
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.