CENTER FOR ARMS CONTROL AND NON-PROLIFERATION

aka CACNP   |   Washington, DC   |  http://www.armscontrolcenter.org

Mission

The Center for Arms Control and Non-Proliferation is a national non-partisan non-profit dedicated to enhancing peace and security through expert policy analysis and thought-provoking research. Since 1980, the Center's expertise on reducing the threats of war and nuclear weapons has been sought by the media and policymakers, and supported by the tax-deductible contributions of foundations and individuals. The Center is a Washington, D.C.-based 501(c)(3) organization, and its affiliated 501(c)(4) organization is the Council for a Livable World, founded in 1962 by Leo Szilard. The Council's mission is to increase peace and security and to reduce the threat of nuclear weapons by representing our members in Washington and electing congressional candidates who support our goals.

Ruling year info

1980

Executive Director

Mr. John Tierney

Main address

820 1st St. NE LL-180

Washington, DC 20002 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

04-2693322

NTEE code info

Arms Control, Peace Organizations (Q41)

International Peace and Security (Q40)

Research Institutes and/or Public Policy Analysis (Q05)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Fissile Materials Working Group

The Fissile Materials Working Group (FMWG) is a coalition of 80 civil society organizations from around the world working to provide actionable policy solutions to keep the world safe from nuclear terrorism. In September 2017, the Center for Arms Control and Non-Proliferation became the host organization of the Fissile Materials Working Group.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our goal is to reduce the threats of war and nuclear weapons.

Our strategies include meeting frequently with members of Congress and their staff to provide them with hard-hitting, fact-based analysis and research, so that they can make well-informed decisions on national security and foreign policy. We work closely with the media to provide insights on these issues, with the goal of broader public education on the threats of nuclear weapons and war.

The Center's long list of military and foreign policy experts help us to meet our goals by lending their expertise in our products, in our meetings with members of Congress, and in working with the media.

In addition, the Center is the only arms control organization to be led by a former Member of Congress and have in senior leadership a former State Department arms control official. This combination of expertise uniquely positions us to look at policy from legislative and implementation standpoints, and to effectively communicate the results of potential policy changes government-wide.

Between the Center, Fissile Materials Working Group (FMWG) and its C4 sister organization, the Council for a Livable World, we have made great strides in garnering attention for our issues.

More people are talking about nuclear weapons policy than have been in recent years. The Center is trying to capitalize on that attention by pushing out a series of informative videos and podcasts through our Nukes of Hazard public-facing educational brand, which has recently undergone a modernization.

Additionally, we have worked to expose and criticize much of the waste, fraud and abuse that goes on with the Pentagon's budgeting practices, but we have far to go in working to eliminate the Overseas Contingency Operations account, which functions as a budget gimmick, and to reduce the Pentagon's budget overall.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Community meetings/Town halls, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time, It is hard to come up with good questions to ask people, It is difficult to get honest feedback from the people we serve, It is difficult to identify actionable feedback,

Financials

CENTER FOR ARMS CONTROL AND NON-PROLIFERATION
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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CENTER FOR ARMS CONTROL AND NON-PROLIFERATION

Board of directors
as of 07/12/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Ambassador Peter Galbraith

Ed Levine

Sharon Squassoni

Susan Burke

Samuel Knight

James Walsh

Lisa Perry

At the Brink

Mark Appleton

Dr. Tess Bridgeman

Just Security

Dr. Togzhan Kassenova

Expert

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Not applicable

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 7/12/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 07/12/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.