The Greater Boston Food Bank, Inc.

aka The Greater Boston Food Bank   |   Boston, MA   |  http://www.gbfb.org

Mission

The Greater Boston Food Bank's mission is to end hunger here in Eastern Massachusetts. Our objective is to distribute enough food to provide at least one meal a day to those in need.

Ruling year info

1990

Principal Officer

Ms. Catherine D'Amato

Main address

70 South Bay Avenue

Boston, MA 02118 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

04-2717782

NTEE code info

Food Banks, Food Pantries (K31)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Brown Bag

Brown Bag provides healthy, supplemental bags of groceries to over 8,400 low-income seniors at 14 partner community organizations each month. GBFB delivers over 11,000 pounds of groceries to partner agencies, where dedicated volunteers - many of whom are Brown Bag recipients - return to sort and pack groceries into individual bags for pick-up or delivery to local seniors. A typical grocery bag weighs about fifteen pounds and contains roughly $40 worth of nutritious food items, such as: milk, cheese, ground turkey, yogurt, spinach, carrots, dried fruit, spaghetti, peanut butter, and cereal.

Population(s) Served
Seniors

Mobile markets are one of GBFB's direct distribution initiatives and enable GBFB to directly reach low-income communities and populations at high-risk of hunger by way of our refrigerated trucks. At each mobile pantry site, clients can choose from a diverse selection of fresh produce, dairy products, staple food items, and a variety of frozen meats. Food is set up in the style of a farmer's market and distributed by groups of volunteers during times that are convenient for working families, including evenings and weekends. GBFB's mobile markets benefit from our strong partnerships with organizations that cross the public and nonprofit sectors, from state agencies such as the Massachusetts Department of Veterans' Services to GBFB program sites such as the Fall River Boys & Girls Club (Kids Cafe site) and the Commonwealth Tenants Association (Brown Bag site).

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

School-based pantries (SBPs) are one of GBFB's direct distribution initiatives and provide an avenue for children and their families to receive fresh, healthy food at convenient and safe school locations.These distributions, organized in the style of a farmer's market, coincide with all-school events to allow children and their families to share the experience in a positive community atmosphere. GBFB's first school-based pantry opened in November 2011 at the Hennigan Elementary School in Jamaica Plain, where 100% of children qualify for free or reduced lunch.

Population(s) Served
Families

Where we work

Accreditations

Charity Navigator

Awards

LEED Silver Certification 2011

U.S. Green Building Council

Innovation Award 2010

Modern Materials Handling Magazine

Honor Award 2009

Association of Commercial and Institutional Builders

Certificate of Appreciation 2005

America's Second Harvest

Bristol Lodge Recognition Award 2005

Middlesex Human Service Agency

Outstanding Community Partnership 2004

Boston Cares

MAASCAP Self-Sufficiency Association Partnership Award 2002

Massachusetts Community Action Program Directors Association

Certificate of Merit 2000

Freedoms Foundation at Valley Forge

#10 Women-Led Business in Massachusetts 2015

The Commonwealth Institute & Boston Globe Magazine

Affiliations & memberships

Feeding America - Affiliate 1981

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of meals served or provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Pounds of produce distributed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of food donation partners

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The Greater Boston Food Bank's (GBFB) mission is to end hunger in eastern Massachusetts, and our strategic objective is to distribute enough food to provide at least One Meal A Day to each person in need in eastern Massachusetts. Each year, Team GBFB works diligently and passionately to reach fundraising, food acquisition and food distribution goals. Goals are carefully set using data that GBFB mines and tracks through mapping technologies to inform how much food should be distributed where.

During fiscal year 2015 (October 1, 2015-September 30, 2016), our food distribution goal is 50 million pounds of food, or 41 million healthy meals. Of the 51 million pounds, our goal is to ensure that at least 80% meets the highest nutrition standards and that at least 25% consists of fresh produce.

To reach our annual goals and the growing need for hunger relief support in eastern Massachusetts, The Greater Boston Food Bank (GBFB) will focus on three key strategic areas:

1) Engage the Community: Increase awareness and fundraising to help End Hunger Here.
- Grow corporate, individual donor and volunteer circles. Ninety two cents of every dollar goes directly toward hunger relief efforts and volunteers save one million dollars in labor costs each year.
- Cultivate more local partnerships. By partnering locally, together, we support local economic health.

2) Meet the Growing Need: Continue to track One Meal a Day progress through innovative practices.
- Monitor the need using geographical mapping software to identify where the need is greatest and respond accordingly.
- Build and expand agency capacity and advocacy.
- Continue to refine operational and supply chain efficiencies to support the need.

3) Provide More Nutritious Meals Per Day: Support healthy lives and communities by acquiring and distributing nutritious food and expanding nutrition education.
- Enhance relationships with produce vendors, such as local farmers, to increase fresh produce distribution.
- Expand community nutrition education through GBFB's Registered Dieticians.
- Continue to optimize warehouse best practices and logistics to maximize distribution ability.

GBFB acquires food through food industry product donations, food drives and financial contributions that enable us to purchase additional high nutrient quality food. We also benefit from the generosity of over 25,000 volunteers annually who help to sort and distribute donated food products.

GBFB works to acquire, store, organize and distribute food through local food pantries, community meal programs, homeless and residential shelters, youth programs, senior centers, and day-care centers embedded in communities throughout the nine counties of eastern Massachusetts. GBFB’s food assistance locator provides an easy way for people in need to find help nearby. GBFB also distributes food directly to those in need through dedicated programs that serve particularly vulnerable groups, such as seniors and children.

Our capabilities include:
1) Food acquisition: purchased, donated, and food drives
2) Food storage and distribution through our 117,000 square foot warehouse, cross dock locations and direct service programs
3) Nutrition education and programs designed by Registered Dieticians on Team GBFB
4) Volunteer programs daily at GBFB and through customized volunteer experiences on- or off-site

The Greater Boston Food Bank (GBFB) has expanded in areas we are proud of and that will continue to be a priority. Of the 51 million pounds of food distributed in fiscal year 2014, over 13 million was fresh produce. And, some of that produce was purchased right in Massachusetts from local farmers and vendors. Thanks to GBFB's Registered Dieticians, 82% of our total inventory met the highest nutritional standards.

Beyond food distribution, we also consider it our responsibility to be engaged community members. Through various nutrition programs, the GBFB Nutrition Team spends a great deal of time in the communities we serve providing nutrition education and tips on how to prepare different types of food. We focus on seniors through our Senior Hunger Initiative by helping them to complete SNAP applications so they can benefit from this resource. Our Child Hunger Initiative will allow us to continue to focus on the one in four children at risk of hunger in eastern Massachusetts.

Over the next year, we will continue to focus on reaching areas in need with more healthy food and to continuing to focus on the most vulnerable populations, such as children and seniors. We are committed to working toward our strategic objective of providing One Meal A Day to everyone in need in eastern Massachusetts.Our vision is a hunger-free Massachusetts and, together, we can End Hunger Here.

Financials

The Greater Boston Food Bank, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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The Greater Boston Food Bank, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 2/22/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mrs. Joanna Travis

Woody Bradford

Conning Asset Management

M. W. Sam Davis

Allstate Investments, LLC

Vicary Graham

BNY Mellon Wealth Management

Les Nanberg

Cornerstone Wealth Management

Sharyn Neble

No Affiliation

Trudi Veldman

Abbott Bioresearch Center

Robert Bralower

Baupost Group, L.L.C.

Minnie Joung

Fidelity Investments

Chip O'Hare

JOH

Joanna Travis

Dunkin' Brands

Catherine D'Amato

The Greater Boston Food Bank

Christopher Flynn

Massachusetts Food Association

Judith Palmer

Stop and Shop

Julie LaFontaine

The Open Door

Mark McGowan

Stop & Shop Massachusetts

Quincy Miller

Citizens Bank

Michael Travis

Travis & Company

Kenneth Lee

Big Brothers Big Sisters, Mass Bay

Stephen Woods

Citizens Bank

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 02/22/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Decline to state
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data