Woodwell Climate Research Center

Climate Science for Change

Falmouth, MA   |  https://www.woodwellclimate.org/

Mission

Our Mission: To conduct science for solutions at the nexus of climate, people and nature. We partner with leaders and communities for just, meaningful impact to address the climate crisis.

Ruling year info

1991

President and Chief Executive Officer, Senior Scientist

Dr. Robert Max Holmes

Main address

149 Woods Hole Road

Falmouth, MA 02540 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Woods Hole Research Center

EIN

04-3005094

NTEE code info

Physical Sciences/Earth Sciences Research and Promotion (U30)

Natural Resource Conservation and Protection (C30)

Research Institutes and/or Public Policy Analysis (W05)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2020, 2019 and 2018.
Register now

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Woodwell Climate is at the forefront in understanding and finding solutions to global climate change. There remains a limited window of opportunity to address the global climate change challenge. The way that Earth's natural systems respond to a rapidly-warming climate and to human reshaping of the land surface will determine our quality of life for generations to come. We now know that rapid changes across vast areas—clearing of tropical forests, thawing permafrost, loss of organic material from agricultural soils, and nutrient pollution of the coastal ocean—cause cascading and interconnected changes that determine how well these systems will sustain life, and how much humankind will be able to count on them to buffer the increasingly dangerous effects of a warmer and more variable climate. Woodwell Climate is a world leader in producing policy-relevant science that informs decision makers at all levels on how to adapt to and slow down climate change.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Climate Change Research

Climate change is an interconnected and multidimensional problem. Woodwell Climate brings together researchers and stakeholders to establish a research agenda that will produce science with the power to affect policy change on the largest possible scale. At the same time, we seek to amplify our impact by cultivating partnerships at every level—from international organizations and national governments, to public and private institutions, and local communities and Indigenous peoples—ensuring that the knowledge we gain is widely shared and effectively applied. Given the urgency of the climate crisis, it it is not enough to simply do good research. Our researchers and policy experts are actively involved in creating policy briefs, providing expert testimony, and working with government offices to share directly relevant climate science. Woodwell Climate focuses ongoing research initiatives in five program areas - Arctic, Carbon, Risk, Tropics, and Water.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth
Economically disadvantaged people

Understanding the Arctic is critical to understanding our climate. As permafrost continues to thaw due to rising temperatures, it is releasing vast amounts of ancient carbon, as well as newly produced greenhouse gases—methane and nitrous oxide. Woodwell Climate researchers are working to measure, track, and reduce these risks for the global population. They also provide vital data to help Indigenous communities better understand how permafrost regions are changing, and how they can prepare, adapt, and respond to these changes. Permafrost emissions have not yet been included in the models and reports that inform international climate policy by the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). To get these critical data integrated into international climate policy, the Arctic Program has developed and deployed first-of-their-kind monitoring networks and is partnering with Harvard Kennedy School’s Belfer Center Arctic Initiative to collect the best data on Arctic carbon.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth
Economically disadvantaged people

Woodwell’s Carbon Program researchers have produced seminal analyses of the global potential of natural climate solutions, historic depletion and potential restoration of soil carbon, the importance of Indigenous land rights, and the impact of warming on the land carbon sink. By harnessing these data, Woodwell’s research contributes to the fundamental understanding of the carbon cycle and its impacts on climate. Carbon Program researchers are creating important new knowledge about the Earth’s temperate, tropical and boreal forests and vegetation—and using it to protect them from deforestation, degradation and disturbance. Their work is foundational in the search for natural solutions to climate change, with the power to inform science, guide policy and education, and help reshape agricultural and business practices around the world. Their collaborative approach and deep knowledge of land carbon dynamics are fundamental to realizing these solutions.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth
Economically disadvantaged people

Woodwell’s Risk Program translates far-reaching climate impacts into concrete socioeconomic terms—risk assessments, economic valuations, and cost-benefit analyses—that resonate at the highest levels of government and industry. This approach has the power to help shift public perception, improve corporate decision-making, and motivate large-scale public policy to build green, sustainable, and just economies. Our scientists work with public- and private-sector partners to better understand the physical, economic and societal risks associated with climate change, and to develop evidence-based strategies to address them. Research, data, and mapping are used as vital tools to change perceptions and business practices at organizations around the world. Researchers also work with community-based organizations around the world—as well as local communities, using powerful risk assessment tools to educate and empower citizens to address climate change, justly and equitably, in their local areas.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth
Economically disadvantaged people

Tropical forests are one of the only large-scale tools available to combat global warming. There is no solution for climate change without tropical forests. Tropics Program researchers focus on quantifying and communicating the ecological, climatic and economic risks of deforestation—and how to reduce these risks by implementing innovative economic and policy incentives to conserve forests on public and private lands. Our scientists work with a diverse set of actors in the tropics—from Indigenous peoples to small landowners and multinational corporations—to help them achieve sustainability by reducing deforestation and degradation while increasing agricultural production and wellbeing. Woodwell is also involved in a wide range of policy and governance work with local partners to engage policy makers, develop relationships with Indigenous peoples and agribusinesses, and conduct empirical studies of land policies to help determine how to implement solutions on the largest possible scale.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth
Economically disadvantaged people

Woodwell’s Water Program scientists track rainfall, river discharge, and water chemistry to see what changes are taking place and to gain insights into how climate change, human development, and other disturbances affect surrounding ecosystems. Joining together with partners from around the world, Woodwell researchers investigate water chemistry in Earth’s most significant river systems to create an integrated picture of the effects of climate change and other disturbances on their watersheds. Our scientists also work with residents of communities to monitor the health of local waterways and wetlands, which are often the lifeblood of rural communities. Citizen scientists help collect and test the water samples that build a robust data network. Understanding the water cycle is critical because not only does it cut across virtually every area of climate research at Woodwell, it’s absolutely vital to supporting ecosystem adaptation and improving resilience in a time of global change.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth
Economically disadvantaged people

Where we work

Accreditations

Charity Navigator 2015

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of peer-reviewed publications

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Children and youth, Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of media citations of Woodwell Climate's staff and work

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Children and youth, Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

As measured by Cision media monitoring

Number of staff representatives at the Conference of the Parties (COP)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Children and youth, Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

COP25 was not held in 2020 due to the pandemic.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    All of humanity and society. Our climate science research is undertaken to promote the greatest possible societal benefit.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Community meetings/Town halls, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Prior to COP26, the COP Presidency and Woodwell organized a series of listening workshops for 13 G20 countries. These guided discussions helped to identify how best to deliver climate risk science to heads of government in a way that will influence national climate policy. Woodwell helped to convene experts, advisors and advocates on risk to collect and share best practices. Workshop outcomes were summarized in a report released at COP26. Recurring themes included the desire for research conducted with policy in mind, pairing information with solutions, and using an interdisciplinary approach to risk assessment. The workshops showed a clear way forward to improve our climate risk assessments to be more relevant to stakeholders. The next phase is to help implement these recommendations.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Gathering valuable feedback enables us to adjust our collaborative efforts with our partners that improve the viability of the outcomes that we are seeking to reach together. An example of this is our ongoing work with Indigenous communities in the Amazon rainforest and in the Arctic.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback,

Financials

Woodwell Climate Research Center
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Woodwell Climate Research Center

Board of directors
as of 06/15/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Joseph Mueller

Diane Falconer

Michael Fanger

Thomas Hynes

John LeCoq

Joseph Mueller

Georgia Nassikas

William Pisano

Constance Roosevelt

Stephanie Tomasky

Christina DeConcini

Gail Greenwald

Andre Guimaraes

Roger Kranenburg

Robert Litterman

William Moomaw

Glenn Prickett

Daniel Reifsnyder

Cyrus Wadia

Victoria Lowell

Joseph Kennedy

III

Wilhelm Merck

Kilaparti Ramakrishna

Joseph Robinson

Izabella Teixeira

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 12/13/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 12/10/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.