SECOND CHANCE ANIMAL SERVICES INC

More than just a shelter

aka SECOND CHANCE ANIMAL SERVICES INC   |   East Brookfield, MA   |  www.secondchanceanimals.org

Mission

To provide temporary shelter to stray, abandoned and surrendered animals for the purpose of finding permanent suitable new homes. To provide assistance and financial aid to prevent overpopulation through spaying and neutering programs. To support a healthy pet community and responsible animal husbandry by providing reasonable cost general veterinary services, as well as low/no cost general veterinary services to those unable to afford care for their pets. To provide low/no cost general veterinary services to animal control agencies, animal shelters and rescues To establish cross-referral networks with local "for profit" veterinary doctors and clinics To provide assistance and information to others whose purposes are consistent with the purpose of Second Chance Animal Services, Inc.

Ruling year info

1999

CEO

Mrs Sheryl A Blancato

Main address

P.O. Box 136 111 Young Rd

East Brookfield, MA 01515 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Second Chance Animal Shelter

EIN

04-3490671

NTEE code info

Animal Protection and Welfare (includes Humane Societies and SPCAs) (D20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Our goal is simple - keep pets out of shelters, home with the people who love them. Our Community Veterinary Hospitals provides access to care to all, focusing on underserved communities. An estimated 23 million animals live in poverty. Subsidized rates can prevent animal suffering and surrender and empower pet owners to care for their pets in a sustainable model. Additional programs include community outreach for elderly and disabled pet owners, a pet food pantry, Project Good Dog pairing behaviorally needy dogs with inmates at local correctional facilities for training, educational outreach and a transport facility and no-kill shelter providing refuge for homeless pets. Animal Welfare has changed. Decades of spay/neuter have lowered the euthanasia of adoptable pets from 17.4million in 1974 to an estimated 733,000 today. A new approach to stop animal suffering is needed. Surrender prevention is the focus, not just number of adopted animals.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Low-Cost Spay/Neuter Clinic

Second Chance offers low-cost spay and neuter surgeries to pet owners, local animal control officers and rescues with fees based on income level.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Second Chance takes in abandoned, stray and surrendered animals from animal control officers and families who cannot keep them.  We update their vaccines, spay and neuter and provide any medical needs through our subsidized vet clinics before posting them for adoption. Our "Almost Home Facility" serves as a New England hub for animals being transported from other parts of the country

Population(s) Served
Adults

Our full service Community Veterinary Hospitals located in North Brookfield, Worcester and Springfield, MA, care for the medical needs of pets offering subsidized pricing for qualified households. We want to ensure that no pet suffers in pain simply because the owner is unable to afford veterinary care. The goal is to provide access to medical care to all.

Population(s) Served
Adults

We provide educational outreach to schools, youth groups, libraries, and the general public to help teach proper pet ownership, how to be safe around pets, and how to help pets in need.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Adults

Employing our two 26 ft. mobile surgical and adoption units, Second Chance conducts low cost and in some cases no cost vaccine clinics at various locations throughout the state, as well as bringing veterinary care and surgery capability directly to those who cannot get to us. Our vehicles also hold "Adoption Events" at various locations throughout the state

Population(s) Served
Adults

Mentored by The Humane Society of the United States and funded by PetSmart Charities, this program goes directly into the underserved community to develop relationships and provide needed services to the community at no charge. Building the human/animal bond we are able to keep pets in their homes, healthy and happy, and not being subjected to surrender or in some cases even abandonment. With 87% of animals living in homes below the poverty level, this is the new frontier to be addressed by animal welfare organizations. It is no longer enough to sit in our brick and mortar facilities waiting for those who need help to come to us. We need to go to them since many do not have the means to get to us.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Bringing our team of vets and vet techs directly into the communities that need us the most, providing needed care to pets.
Executing the myriad of community based programs that we have developed to provide access to care for all such as our Homebound to the Rescue, mobile vaccine clinics, Pets for Life Project Good Dog and so many more.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Seniors

Where we work

Awards

Rescue Story Award (story later featured in a Pedigree adoption commercial) 2007

Pedigree

Top Ten Emergency Placement Partner since 2010 2016

Humane Society of the United Stated

Medical Director Dr. Park voted Best Veterinarian by readers 2019

Worcester Magazine

Best Nonprofit 2020

Telegram & Gazette

Best Veterinarian 2019

Telegram & Gazette

Best Pet Services 2019

Telegram & Gazette

Top-Rated Nonprofit 2021

Greatnonprofits.org

Best Veterinary Clinic 2022

The Republican & MassLive

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of animal adoptions

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Adoption Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Our mobile adoption units brings "Adoption Events" to areas beyond our brick and mortar. Our "'Almost Home" quarantine facility allows us to transport more animals from potential euthanasia.

Average length of stay

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Adoption Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Our veterinary hospitals make Second Chance uniquely qualified to provide refuge to at-risk pets with extensive veterinary needs. 2019 saw several pets with extended medical cases.

Number of animals helped per year by adoption or by medical care

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Community Veterinary Hospitals Offering Subsidized Rates for Qualified Households

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Second Chance continues to meet the increasing demand for help through a wide array of programs and services.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Second Chance Animal Services is committed to ending animal suffering, abuse and overpopulation. It is our firm belief that pets need more than sheltering and adoption programs. Our strategy focuses on keeping animals out of shelters and in their homes. The solution to overpopulation is "Surrender Prevention." Our high-quality, low-cost spay/neuter program and vaccine clinics help families afford basic care for their pet. Our Community Veterinary Hospitals provide full service medical care for animals at subsidized rates to qualified families facing financial challenges. Our mobile veterinary clinic goes to neighborhoods where families do not have the means to get to our "Brick and Mortar" facilities. with the ability to preform wellness exams, vaccines and many types of surgeries on site. Education of owners and potential adopters is imperative to help families deal with dog behavior and modify unwanted behaviors via positive reinforcement. Our Educational Outreach Programs goes directly into schools and organizations teaching proper care and handling of animals as well establishing a sound and healthy respect of animals to foster a generation of new pet owners who will respect and care for their animals. We are committed to keeping animals healthy, free of pain and stress so they can live long and happy lives.

Second Chance Animal Services can provide a complete array of services for pets. We are capable of providing a comfortable, stress reducing environment for stray or abandoned animals at our shelter. Our three Community Veterinary Hospitals, located in North Brookfield, Springfield, and Worcester, MA, provide low-cost veterinary care for companion animals in qualified households. No animal should suffer in pain simply because the owner does not have the financial ability to provide the necessary medical attention. With the help of donors, benefactors, and grants, we are able to offer subsidized rates for pet owners who meet certain income levels. At our Adoption Center, a full time veterinary technician is on staff to monitor each animal's needs and work with our veterinary staff to meet these needs . The North Brookfield hospital houses an advanced care unit which can treat and monitor seriously ill animals at a cost that owners under the poverty level can afford. We are committed to saving lives and ending suffering for ALL animals, not just those whose owners have the financial means to provide extreme care. It is our belief that the new role of animal sheltering and welfare is to provide a full array of programs to allow all owners to care for their animal's medical needs, have professional assistance in dealing with behavioral issues that normally lead to surrender, spay and neuter their pets to end overpopulation and euthanasia, and continue to maintain a haven for those animals who need temporary care and housing until suitable homes can be found for them. We cannot "adopt" our way out of animal suffering. We continue to develop and implement programs that provide the needed services to all, focusing on the under-served community where million of animals live in poverty today.
.

Founded in 1999 by our founder and Executive Director, Sheryl Blancato, our adoption center is able to attract a dedicated following of donors and benefactors who are committed to supporting the shelters mission and vision statements. Throughout it's existence the shelter has not only reached out into its own Central MA communities but has gone beyond those boundaries to assist close to 50 other MA shelters and rescues with spay/neuter assistance and medical needs as well as communities in other counties of our state. The addition of "Subsidized Vet Hospitals" in North Brookfield, Springfield and Worcester as well as our two mobile surgical/adoption vehicles, expand our reach into neighborhoods that need help the most. The number of other organizations that we assist continues to grow each year. The organization enjoys National position by partnering with major animal welfare organizations such HSUS, ASPCA, Maddies Fund, Best Friends and others. Second Chance has been one of HSUS's top ten placement partners since 2010, taking in animals rescued from dog fighting cases, puppy mill seizures, hoarding/neglect/abuse and other horrific situations from all parts of the country. The organiztion has been successful in obtaining funding from many major philanthropic organizations throughout the country providing programs to the most neediest of animal owners. By adhering to complete transparency of the organization and its financials, our donors and benefactors have a high level of confidence that their support is used in only the most efficient, effective manner maximizing the use of every dollar. We are extremely cautious of how we spend donor money ensuring that we do the most for the animals with every donation we receive. Our facilities are strategically placed throughout the state so as to provide help where help is most needed. They are sized to meet the need of the area and allow for lowest cost of overhead possible freeing finances to be used for the purpose of the mission only and not to support high overhead sites.

The dramatic drop in euthanization from the highs of 15 million per year in 1970 to 733,000 in 2019 is a clear indication that the effort of spay/neuter over the past decade is succeeding in its goal to end overpopulation. The number of animals presented to Adoption Centers and Rescues in some states is also showing a stabilization and, again, in many cases a drop. Shelters are now seeing a higher percentage of animals requiring more medical attention than before which is the outcome of the economy, loss of jobs, housing issues, and the ability to have disposable income to apply to companion pet medical attention. This propelled Second Chance to undertake the implementation of subsidized rates at full service veterinary hospitals, bringing affordable medical attention to as many families as possible. The long term goal has always been to end unnecessary suffering of animals. It is only through the help of donors, philanthropic organizations and foundations that these challenges for the public good can be met.

In 2021 Second Chance will open a fourth Community Veterinary Hospital in Southbridge. Not only will this hospital provide access to veterinary care year-round to an underserved community, but it will also serve as a teaching hospital in cooperation with Bay Path Regional Vocational/Technical High School, helping to shape the future of animal welfare.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Second Chance serves pets and pet owners throughout Massachusetts and beyond. We focus on underserved communities and pets with the greatest needs. Four full-service Community Veterinary Hospitals are located in communities where pets and pet owners need the most help. Adoption services provide refuge for homeless pets in the community including local and animal control surrenders and a transport program to rescue pets from overcrowded shelters in the south. Second Chance also operates a pet food pantry program and other programs to keep pets in the community in their homes with the people they love.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Community meetings/Town halls, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To learn about how services we provide impact people as well as pets, and identify new need areas., To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    During recent surveys, we asked people how they felt about going back to coming into the building for veterinary services versus the curbside system we used during COVID. We found that in two of our three locations, there was a high demand to keep the curbside service as part of our operation. It helped to make it easier for people with mobility issues since they could remain in their car and staff would assist with bringing the pets in and out of the veterinary hospital.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    We have found that asking for feedback has been a very positive experience for those that we serve. They feel they are listened to and that we care about what they have to say. If they have had a problem, it can be addressed and they sincerely appreciate being heard. The overwhelmingly positive feedback has helped staff and volunteers to feel they are making a difference. This has spurred them to do more to help because they feel they are appreciated for the work they do. It has been a positive experience for everyone.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

SECOND CHANCE ANIMAL SERVICES INC
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

SECOND CHANCE ANIMAL SERVICES INC

Board of directors
as of 10/14/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr Joseph Blancato

No Affiliation

Sheryl Blancato

No Affiliation

Rebecca Austin

No Affiliation

Robert White

No Affiliation

Joseph Blancato

No Affiliation

Sara Gasparrini

No Affiliation

Heather Gablaski

No Affiliation

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 10/19/2020,

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data