Partners In Health a Nonprofit Corporation

aka PIH; Partners In Health   |   Boston, MA   |  www.pih.org

Mission

Our mission is a preferential option for the poor in health care. By establishing long-term relationships with sister organizations based in settings of poverty, Partners In Health strives to achieve two overarching goals: to bring benefits of modern medical science to those most in need of them and to serve as an antidote to despair.

Ruling year info

2002

CEO

Dr. Gary L Gottlieb MD MBA

Main address

800 Boylston St, Suite 300

Boston, MA 02199 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

04-3567502

NTEE code info

Community Health Systems (E21)

Hospitals and Primary Medical Care Facilities (E20)

Hospital (General) (E22)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

For over thirty years, Partners In Health has worked with communities and governments to bring the fruits of modern medicine to the world's poor. We serve some of the world's most vulnerable communities, located in the hardest-to-reach places, where even the most basic health care hardly exists. Food, clean water, and roads are often hard to come by. PIH now supports public health systems in 10 countries around the world, treating patients, building infrastructure, training health care providers, and developing effective care delivery models in rural and remote settings. We currently support projects in Haiti, Rwanda, Sierra Leone, Liberia, Lesotho, Malawi, Peru, Russia, Mexico, and Navajo Nation. We believe that health care is a human right, and no one should have to die of a disease or condition that is treatable or preventable.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Partners In Health Programs

Established in 1987, PIH provides technical and financial assistance, medical supplies, and administrative support to partner projects in Haiti, Peru, Russia, Rwanda, Lesotho, Malawi, Mexico, Guatemala, Kazakhstan, the Dominican Republic, and Boston. The goal of these partnerships is neither charity nor development but rather "pragmatic solidarity" - a commitment to work alongside the destitute sick against the economic and political structures that cause and perpetuate poverty and illness. PIH believes that health care is a fundamental right, not a privilege. The work of PIH has three goals: to care for our patients, to alleviate the root causes of disease in their communities, and to share lessons learned around the world. Through service, training, advocacy, and research, we seek to raise the standard of care for the destitute sick everywhere.

Population(s) Served

One of the world’s poorest countries, Rwanda was devastated by the 1994 genocide. Around that time, average life expectancy fell below 40 years.

Known locally as Inshuti Mu Buzima, Partners In Health eagerly volunteered to assist the Rwandan government in 2005. We have since helped to bring high-quality health care to three districts that previously had some of the country’s worst health outcomes. Life expectancy has doubled, and Rwanda is a model for how resource-poor countries can build health systems from almost nothing.

We strengthen Rwanda’s public health system in three rural districts, serving 800,000 people.

Population(s) Served

Partners In Health in Peru, known locally as Socios En Salud, has been treating disease and training community members to provide education and care for their neighbors since 1996. As a partner to the Ministry of Health, we also have an impact on national policies for preventing and treating multidrug-resistant tuberculosis and HIV.

We operate 10 health posts in the slums of Lima, serving people who otherwise wouldn't have access to primary care.

Population(s) Served

Partners In Health brings high-quality health care to nearly 120,000 people through a network of rural health facilities in Lesotho.

The rate of HIV infection among adults in Lesotho is one of the highest in the world at 23 percent. And as HIV has taken its toll, the country has also suffered rising rates of maternal mortality, poor child health, and tuberculosis. To reach health services, people struggle through harsh weather and mountainous terrain, walking an average of four hours to reach clinics. Without enough staff and resources, doctors struggle to cope. Life expectancy reflects these problems, peaking at only 49 years.

Lesotho’s health system needs a powerful and long-lasting solution. Known locally as Bo-Mphato Litšebeletsong tsa Bophelo, Partners In Health began working in Lesotho in 2006 at the invitation of the Ministry of Health. Our first task was to improve public health centers in the rural highlands where people with HIV/AIDS had very few options for treatment. In the years that followed we enrolled 7,000 patients in an HIV program. In 2013 the Ministry of Health asked PIH to scale up our work across all of Lesotho—a multiyear national health care reform. We are now beginning to supervise and train clinical staff and community health workers to provide high-quality care in clinics and communities across the entire country.

Population(s) Served

Partners In Health began working in Liberia at the invitation of the Ministry of Health in November 2014. Most of our efforts were focused on responding to Ebola in Maryland County, a 20-hour drive south from the capital of Monrovia. We supported two Ebola treatment units and three community care centers, and taught teachers and community members new techniques to slow the spread of infections.

Since Ebola came under control in Liberia in March 2015, PIH has focused on helping rebuild the health system, primarily for a population of roughly 100,000 in Maryland County.

Using the accompaniment approach that has proven successful in Haiti, Rwanda, and elsewhere, we’re collaborating with the government to guide and help patients through every step of treatments. Community health workers meet people in their homes, addressing basic health concerns and helping them find care, if need be.

Population(s) Served

In Sierra Leone, Partners In Health helps to rebuild the public health system, which was decimated by an Ebola epidemic.

Many people know Sierra Leone from the civil war, which lasted from 1991 to 2002, and the black-market “blood diamonds” that fueled it. But as was made clear during the Ebola epidemic of 2014 and 2015, the country’s underfunded, underequipped, and understaffed health care system has been plenty lethal, too.

Partners In Health began working in Sierra Leone in the fall of 2014. For the first year, we focused on responding to the Ebola outbreak. At the request of the Ministry of Health and Sanitation, we worked primarily in Port Loko district, an Ebola hotspot outside the capital of Freetown, and in the remote Kono district, a day’s drive to the east.

Population(s) Served

Haiti is often defined by what it lacks: a stable economy, high employment, solid infrastructure, and access to quality food, clean water, and universal health care.

For nearly three decades, Partners In Health has worked to reverse that definition. Our program in Haiti, known locally as Zanmi Lasante, is our oldest and most replicated. We operate clinics and hospitals at 12 sites across the Central Plateau and the lower Artibonite, two of the country's poorest regions.

Today we are the largest nongovernment health care provider in Haiti, serving an area of 4.5 million people with a staff of more than 5,700.

Population(s) Served

Malawians face a crushing HIV/AIDS epidemic and high rates of infant and maternal mortality. These and other health problems are difficult to overcome; quality care is scarcely available or unaffordable for most people. Those that can pay for treatment are often unable to reach clinics, especially over the mountainous terrain and barely passable roads of rural areas.

Since 2007, Partners In Health in Malawi, known locally as Abwenzi Pa Za Umoyo, has worked in partnership with the Ministry of Health in the rural district of Neno to provide comprehensive care for about 150,000 people.

When PIH began working in Neno, there was no district hospital, and its 10 health centers had fallen into disrepair. In the years since, PIH has constructed Neno District Hospital and a community hospital, revitalized the 10 health centers, built another, and will soon complete construction of yet another. Key programs at these health centers include treatment and prevention for complex diseases such as HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis. We have also launched initiatives to treat and prevent malaria and child malnutrition and reduce maternal mortality rates. In 2011, PIH opened a Nutritional Rehabilitation Unit to treat severely malnourished children—the first of its kind in the district.

Population(s) Served

Mexico guarantees universal health coverage for all its citizens, but fulfillment of that promise falls short for those living in remote locations. Rural public clinics are often empty because the government doesn’t assign them doctors or does so temporarily.

Partners In Health wanted to close that gap. Known locally as Compañeros En Salud, we started working in Mexico in 2011 and now operate out of 10 rural public clinics in the Sierra Madre mountains of Chiapas—one of the most marginalized regions in the country. Our goal is to improve staffing and supply of the clinics, and link them to more specialized care in hospitals outside the communities.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

By establishing long-term relationships with sister organizations based in settings of poverty, PIH has two overarching goals: to bring the benefits of modern medicine to those most in need, and to serve as an antidote to despair.

Working at the scale of the world's most profound health challenges demands that we measure ourselves against clinical goals big enough for the whole world to see. At Partners In Health, there is no goal greater than zero, none with more power to hold the global community to account: everything we do and make, the partnerships we cement, the spaces and systems we bring online today are united by one historic ambition—to traverse the vanishing point of preventable suffering.

We've set our four top-line clinical priorities in direct response to the pain we encounter in the places we work. Meeting it head-on—within a proven model of community-centered care—offers a way to make good on the promises that medicine made possible decades ago, but has yet to deliver to half the planet:

ZERO preventable maternal deaths in childbirth ZERO childhood malnutrition deaths
ZERO mother-to-child HIV transmission
ZERO tuberculosis deaths

Partners In Health partners with local governments as well as the world's leading medical and academic institutions to create lasting health care systems for vulnerable people living in the world's poorest places. We establish and strengthen public health care systems by training local health workers, nurses, and doctors in order to raise the standard of care and to build workforces of local health professionals. Through this network, we provide high-quality health care for people in their homes and communities, which also benefits local economies and helps to end the vicious cycle of poverty and disease. We stay in the places where we work, committed to accompanying the people and communities we serve for the long term.

Partners In Health's widely recognized leadership on issues of health access for the destitute sick first took root as a moral conviction within our founders, who pushed back forcefully against the low ambitions and double standards of many in the global health community. It grew into a series of pioneering programs that significantly raised the standard for treatment of the world's deadliest diseases in resource-poor settings. Remaining focused on these foundational public health issues makes as much medical and moral sense today as it ever has, but it's also an important financial play on behalf of our patients: as adopted by the U.N. Millennium Project and a huge subset of international changemakers, this work is focusing multi-national streams of development funding for the next decade or more.

Working with governments, scholars and communities, PIH's approach to care delivery has had an outsized influence in shaping the global health agenda. From pioneering the treatment of drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) in Peru, to initiating the first HIV treatment program in Haiti utilizing anti-retroviral therapy, PIH has proven that equitable, high-quality healthcare coverage is possible, even for complex, chronic diseases. This work contributed to groundbreaking new global standards of care, and mechanisms to resource this care for HIV and TB patients around the world.

Financials

Partners In Health a Nonprofit Corporation
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
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  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Partners In Health a Nonprofit Corporation

Board of directors
as of 10/06/2017
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Ophelia Dahl

Partners In Health


Board co-chair

Dr. Paul Farmer

Paul Farmer

Community Volunteer

Todd McCormack

Community Volunteer

Ophelia Dahl

Community Volunteer

Ted Philip

Community Volunteer

Jack Connors

Community Volunteer

Diane Kaneb

Community Volunteer

Gary Gottlieb

Community Volunteer

Lesley King

Community Volunteer

Albert Kaneb

Community Volunteer

Dan Nova

Community Volunteer

Anita Bekenstein

Community Volunteer

David Walton

Community Volunteer

Michael Choe

Community Volunteer

Charlotte Wagner

Community Volunteer

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? No
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes