Rhode Island Historical Society

Providence, RI   |  www.rihs.org

Mission

Honoring, interpreting, and sharing Rhode Island’s past to enrich the present and inspire the future.

Ruling year info

1925

Executive Director

C. Morgan Grefe Ph.D.

Main address

110 Benevolent St

Providence, RI 02906 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

05-0259110

NTEE code info

(Historical Societies, Historic Preservation) (A82)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2019, 2018 and 2017.
Register now

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

This profile needs more info.

If it is your nonprofit, add a problem overview.

Login and update

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Collections & Research Center

The Rhode Island Historical Society's Robinson Research Center is charged with preserving our collections and ensuring access to our materials to as many researchers, students, genealogists, and Rhode Islanders as possible.

The collection includes 20,000 objects, including armaments, furnishings, paintings, textiles, sculptures, toys, tools, vehicles, and more. In addition, we hold over 10 million pages of manuscripts and 9 million feet of moving picture film. We also preserve and care for over 100,000 books, 194,000 photographs, 3,000 maps, 19,000 prints, 900 broadsides, 4,000 drawings, 20,000 architectural drawings, 3,000 sound recordings, and 16,000 pieces of emphera.

In addition to providing services for hundreds of in-person researchers, staff also answer nearly 1,700 research inquiries via email each year. Projects to ensure greater public access to materials are also prioritized including digitization, the creation of finding aids, and the creation of web platforms.

Population(s) Served

The Rhode Island Historical Society operates two museums: The John Brown House Museum in Providence and the Museum of Work & Culture in Woonsocket.

Each museum offers insights into Rhode Island's history at different points in a larger continuum. The John Brown House allows visitors to discover the history of Rhode Island from the colonial period through the mid-19th-century. The Museum of Work & Culture then continues the next century of that narrative, exploring themes of immigration and labor.

Both museums offer free field trips to all educational groups, including K-12 public and private school students, homeschool families, colleges and universities, and scout groups. They also offer changing gallery spaces, offering extensions of the museum's themes.

Population(s) Served

The Newell D. Goff Center for Education & Public Programs provides a variety of educational and program opportunities for the public each year.

Educational offerings include free field trips to the John Brown House Museum and the Museum of Work & Culture for all students, as well as a bus fund for Title 1 schools in Rhode Island. Additionally, we provde an ever-expanding digital Rhode Island History textbook that provides essays, primary sources, and lesson plans covering topics ranging from the history of the Narragansett to the Civil Rights movement. We also organize National History Day in Rhode Island, our state's competition, and offer free registration for all Rhode Island students. We also provide access to free professional development for educators.

Additionally, each year we welcome thousands to dozens of in-person and virtual public programs created to highlight lesser-known histories, promote local and national partners, and create contemporary connections to the past.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person),

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

Financials

Rhode Island Historical Society
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Rhode Island Historical Society

Board of directors
as of 05/05/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Robert Sloan, Jr.

Michael Baker, Jr.

Amica Insurance

Winifred Brownell, Ph.D.

University of Rhode Island

Paul Croce, Sc.D.

FM Global

Cindy Salazar, Esq.

Law Office of Cindy Salazar

Michael Eadie

Washington Trust

Michael Gerhardt

Roberta Gosselin

Amica Insurance

Scott MacKay

Rhode Island NPR

Lisa Melton

AAA Northeast

Peter Miniati, JD, CFP

F.L.Putnam

Maureen Moakley, Ph.D.

University of Rhode Island

Alletta Morris Cooper

Marcus Nevius, Ph.D.

University of Rhode Island

Vanessa Quainoo, Ph.D.

Alicia Samolis, JD

Partridge Snow & Hahn, LLP

Luther Spoehr, Ph.D

Brown University

Lane Sparkman

RI Department of State

Theodore Smalletz

Gloria Duchin, Inc

Stanley Weiss

Stanley Weiss Associates, LLC

James Wing

RBC Wealth Management

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 5/4/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Multi-Racial/Multi-Ethnic (2+ races/ethnicities)
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person with a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data