PLATINUM2024

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Community Center

Building a stronger Newport County, since 1922

aka a/k/a MLK Community Center   |   Newport, RI   |  www.mlkccenter.org

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Mission

The Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Community Center nourishes, educates, and supports Newport County, Rhode Island residents to improve their economic, social and physical well-being. We build a strong and inclusive community where all people are empowered to be self-reliant and to live their best quality of life.

Ruling year info

1984

Executive Director

Ms. Heather Hole Strout

Main address

20 Dr Marcus Wheatland Blvd

Newport, RI 02840 USA

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Formerly known as

Newport Community Center

EIN

05-0271882

NTEE code info

Kindergarten, Nursery Schools, Preschool, Early Admissions (B21)

Food Service, Free Food Distribution Programs (K30)

Youth Development Programs (O50)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Hunger Services

Our daily breakfast program alleviates short term hunger and social isolation. Our innovative food delivery systems address the needs of all Newport County residents who are food insecure through delivery of nutritious food to homebound neighbors; a mobile pantry to neighborhoods lacking consistent, adequate transportation; and Newport County’s largest and most comprehensive food pantry. Our commitment to nutrition and wellness education, cooking classes, and free access to a registered dietitian moves people from hunger to health.

Population(s) Served
Adults

High-quality early childhood education program for children ages 3-5, emphasizing creative play, experiential learning, social and emotional readiness. 75% of preschool students enter Kindergarten already reading.

Population(s) Served
Infants and toddlers
Parents

A working parent's best friend, AfterSchool makes the hours between the end of school and a parent's work day's end safe, productive and fun. Children in Kindergarten through 4th grade arrive at the Center each weekday after school. Children enjoy a hot, healthy meal and do their homework or read. Children then enjoy a variety of no-cost-added activities including robotics, art, Make Your Life, violin and cello lessons, SPARK physical activity and more.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Parents

Summer Camp is not summer school: it is eight weeks of fun, learning and friendships that stem summer learning loss. Kids entering Kindergarten through rising 5th graders enjoy this program where academics are seamlessly woven with experiential learning into each camp day. Breakfast, lunch and snack is included. Campers learn to sail at Sail Newport, go to the beach, get up-close with local nature and the seashore at the Aquidneck Land Trust, Norman Bird Sanctuary, Ballard Bark, Save the Bay and more. Campers explore at the Naval Undersea Warfare Center and the URI Biomedical Lab. 95% of campers improved their reading scores (5% maintained), 98% maintained or improved their math fluency scores (2% maintained).

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Parents

Where we work

Awards

Best Nonprofit 2021

Greater Newport Chamber of Commerce Excellence in Business awards

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of meals served or provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Children and youth, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Hunger Services

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

2021 was an abbreviated fiscal year, moving from Jan-Dec to July-Jun. 2020 was the height of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Pounds of fresh produce distributed per year

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Children and youth, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Hunger Services

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We are now reporting the pounds of fresh fruits and vegetables we offer free to our community

Number of clients served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Children and youth, Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

2021 reflects change from Jan-Dec to July-June fiscal year.

Amount of Scholarships to Education programs annually to low-income working families

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Adults, Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We act on the feedback we receive

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently, The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection

Financials

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Community Center
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Community Center

Board of directors
as of 06/13/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Whitney Slade

The Riverbend School

Term: 2019 - 2023

Gail Lowney Alofsin

Newport Restaurant Group.

Kim Bullock

St. George's School

Rebeccia Knapp LeBlanc

Safe Harbor Marinas

Elizabeth Phelps

Retired, Blenheim Newport Assisted Living

John Rok

Salve Regina University

Betsy Blair

Retired, Dell Corporation

David D. Schuller

US Navy, Ret.

Margaret McGill

Peoples' Credit Union

Nancy Horsey

School Psychologist

Kimberly Cummins

Retired, Fidelity Investments

Rose M. Hyder

Carey, Richmond & Viking Insurance

Orlando Zambrano

Manner Solutions

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 1/19/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

Transgender Identity

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 06/13/2024

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.