SPECIAL OLYMPICS RHODE ISLAND INC

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aka SORI   |   Smithfield, RI   |  www.specialolympicsri.org

Mission

The mission of Special Olympics Rhode Island is to provide year-round sports training and competition in a variety of Olympic-type sports for children and adults with intellectual disabilities, giving them continuing opportunities to develop physical fitness, demonstrate courage, experience joy, and participate in a sharing of gifts, skills and friendship with their families, other Special Olympics athletes and the community.

Ruling year info

1979

President and Chief Executive Officer

Mr. Edwin Pacheco

Main address

370 George Washington Hwy

Smithfield, RI 02917 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

05-0377867

NTEE code info

Special Olympics (N72)

Down's Syndrome (G25)

Autism (G84)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

As evident throughout history, people in societies around the globe hold many misperceptions and negative attitudes towards people with intellectual disabilities. Negative attitudes have been shown to be barriers to inclusion for people with intellectual disabilities in the community. Several factors, including prior experience with people with intellectual disabilities and educational level, influence attitudes towards people with intellectual disabilities. Research has shown that these attitudes can be changed through increased quality, positive interactions which challenge existing stereotypes. This is at the crux of the Special Olympics Movement and is a strategic priority for the organization. Special Olympics utilizes sport to fight the stigma faced by people with intellectual disabilities, demonstrate their abilities, and change attitudes.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Unified Sports

Dedicated to promoting social inclusion through shared sports training and competition experiences, Unified Sports joins people with and without intellectual disabilities on the same team. It was inspired by a simple principle: training together and playing together is a quick path to friendship and understanding.

In Unified Sports, teams are made up of people of similar age and ability, which makes practices more fun and games more challenging and exciting for all. Having sport in common is just one more way that preconceptions and false ideas are swept away.

Our opponent is intolerance. Only shoulder-to-shoulder, as teammates together, can we defeat it.

Population(s) Served
People with intellectual disabilities
Adults

Unified Champion Schools promotes social inclusion by bringing together young people with and without ID on sports teams (Special Olympics Unified Sports®), through inclusive student clubs, together in school or community-wide initiatives, and by fostering youth leadership. At its core, this strategy is about unifying all students – with and without disabilities – using sports as a catalyst for social inclusion and attitude and behavioral change. Special Olympics Unified Champion Schools is a national program funded by the U.S. Department of Education.

Special Olympics Rhode Island understands the value of involving young people in building a more inclusive world. By educating youth that people with intellectual disabilities cross all boundaries of age, gender, religion and culture, and showing them that all people have something to contribute. Special Olympics Rhode Island is building acceptance for the next generation.

Population(s) Served

The mission of the Special Olympics Athlete Leadership is to empower athletes to develop leadership skills and utilize their voices to assume meaningful leadership roles, influence change in the Special Olympics movement, and educate communities around the world that results in positive life changes. Special Olympics Rhode Island provides training and support for athletes who desire to expand their participation in Special Olympics, both on and off the competition field. Through Athlete Leadership, athletes receive training and have opportunities to hold positions of leadership and influence.

Athlete Leadership allows Special Olympics athletes to help shape the future of the Special Olympics movement and ensure all people with intellectual disabilities have the opportunity to participate in sports training and competition that is fun and fair.

Population(s) Served


The Law Enforcement Torch Run is part of an international campaign for Special Olympics coordinated and managed by all divisions of Law Enforcement officers and officials throughout the world whose mission is to raise dollars and awareness of the Special Olympics Movement worldwide.

Special Olympics Rhode Island is the only state to include police departments, fire departments, RI State Police and the Dept. of Corrections as part of the Torch Run, providing significant financial and public awareness for Special Olympics Rhode Island. They also provide volunteer support to all Special Olympics Rhode Island Area and State Competitions by presenting medals to our athletes.

At its most basic level, the Torch Run is an annual running event in which representatives from police, fire, corrections and state police run the “Flame of Hope” throughout Rhode Island to the SORI State Summer Games Opening Ceremonies.

Population(s) Served

Special Olympics Young Athletes is a sport and play program for children with and without intellectual disabilities (ID), ages 2 to 7 years old. Young Athletes introduces basic sport skills, like running, kicking and throwing.

Young Athletes provides children with activities and games that meet their individual skill and ability levels, while allowing them to play together in a fun and inclusive environment. Children of all abilities take part, and they all benefit.

Children learn how to play with others and develop important skills for learning. Children also learn to share, take turns and follow directions.
Young Athletes is a fun way for children to get fit. It is important to teach children healthy habits while they are young.
Young Athletes is easy to do and fun for all. It can be done at home, in schools or in the community using the Young Athletes Activity Guide and basic equipment.

Population(s) Served

Special Olympics Healthy Athletes® is the world’s largest public health program for people with intellectual disabilities, delivering basic levels of health information and care to thousands of people each year.

At Special Olympics events, Healthy Athletes® offers free screenings in several areas – vision, hearing, dental and fitness assessments – providing free care when possible and making referrals to local practitioners when appropriate. For some athletes, the screenings are the first time they have ever seen a doctor.

Beyond screenings, Healthy Athletes® also trains healthcare professionals about the needs and care of people with intellectual disabilities.

In Rhode Island, the following Healthy Athletes® initiatives are offered at the State Summer Games: Opening Eyes, Special Smiles, FUNfitness and Healthy Hearing.

A MedFest is typically offered in January for SORI athletes to have their medical forms completed.

Population(s) Served
People with intellectual disabilities
People with intellectual disabilities
People with intellectual disabilities
People with intellectual disabilities
People with intellectual disabilities

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of children and adults with intellectual disabilities served each year.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People with intellectual disabilities

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

For 2020 and 2021, due to COVID-19 many athletes did not participate.

Number of children with intellectual disabilities (ages 2-7) participating annually in a sports-play program for physical fitness and gross motor skills development.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People with intellectual disabilities, Children

Related Program

Young Athletes

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Due to COVID many school based programs were not able to participate. The numbers are already higher for 2022.

Number of schools participating in unifying students with intellectual disabilities with their peers without intellectual disabilities in efforts to break down stereotypes and foster inclusion.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People with intellectual disabilities, Children and youth

Related Program

Unified Champion Schools

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Lower numbers directly related to COVID for 2021.

Number of community volunteers, with or without an intellectual disability, who volunteered his/her time to support the organization in any capacity at least once during the calendar year.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People with intellectual disabilities, Adults

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Due to COVID-19 many volunteers were unable to participate in Special Olympics Rhode Island this year.

Number of individuals with intellectual disabilities serving in leadership roles within the organization.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People with intellectual disabilities

Related Program

Athlete Leadership

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Due to COVID-19 many athletes opted not to participate this year.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Special Olympics Rhode Island seeks to empower people with intellectual disabilities to achieve their personal best in all aspects of life, providing opportunities for athletes to demonstrate excellence, improve their physical fitness, and create relationships through sports. Research has shown that many people around the world underestimate the potential and abilities of people with intellectual disabilities. Sport not only helps to change external perceptions, it creates an opportunity to engage, have fun, and be a part of the global cultural phenomenon of sports.

Special Olympics Rhode Island offers a wide menu of year-round sports opportunities, as well as Athlete Leadership and volunteering to suit the many needs and preferences of the Rhode Island families we serve. In the past 20 years, Special Olympics Rhode Island has also offered Unified Sports in Rhode Island public schools, to encourage friendships and inclusion for students with intellectual disabilities and their peers without disabilities. With the experience of playing with and competing with individuals with intellectual disabilities, it is intended to promote life-long habits of acceptance and inclusion.

The Special Olympics concept was born in the early 1960's when Eunice Kennedy Shriver started a day camp for children with intellectual disabilities. She observed the great joy campers experienced when playing sports, and resolved to create a program that meets physical fitness needs and boosts self-esteem. The Rhode Island Chapter of Special Olympics was established in 1968 and has served thousands of athletes and their families ever since.

Special Olympics Rhode Island (SORI) currently serves over 4,000 athletes, all Rhode Islanders with intellectual disabilities. Our athletes are of all ages, from age 2 to 77. Along with the athletes, Special Olympics provides involvement and support to family members and/or caregivers, along with hundreds of volunteers from high schools, colleges and companies from around the state.

Special Olympics Rhode Island is one of the world's most dynamic programs for individuals with intellectual disabilities; providing over 1,600 year-round sports training and athletic competitions for more than 3,400 athletes and hosting over 40 local, regional, and statewide tournaments and competitions each year in 21 official and demonstration sports. Special Olympics Rhode Island also has a Unified Sports Program, a Motor Activities Training Program, Young Athletes Program (for children under age 8), Healthy Athletes Program and the Sargent Shriver Global Messenger Program. Our Unified Champion Schools program is in EVERY Rhode Island Public High School, most Rhode Island Public Middle Schools and a growing number of Public Elementary Schools.

Established in 1968 and a chapter of Special Olympics International, Special Olympics Rhode Island annually provides over 1,600 athletic training and/or competitions at no cost for over 4,000 athletes and their families. Each year we provide opportunities for over 6,000 community volunteers and organize athletic games throughout Rhode Island. Special Olympics Rhode Island Unified Sports was started 20 years ago, and is now in every RI public high school and in most RI public middle schools. Special Olympics Rhode Island Unified Sports is run by our Director of Programs who has been with Special Olympics Rhode Island for over 30 years, along with a team of athletic directors and health experts. Special Olympics Rhode Island places great emphasis on health issues for individuals with intellectual disabilities and their families, encouraging fitness and good-eating habits through education and other resources, all at no cost to the athlete or family.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Special Olympics Rhode Island serves individuals with intellectual disabilities.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Our Athlete Leadership Council often informs the programs and events Special Olympics Rhode Island conducts.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, People with disabilities often have communication challenges,

Financials

SPECIAL OLYMPICS RHODE ISLAND INC
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

SPECIAL OLYMPICS RHODE ISLAND INC

Board of directors
as of 07/29/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Ms. Staci Kolb

Robin Moses

BankRI

Tim Rishton

IGT

Chris Eden

People's Credit Union

Larry LaSala

Textron

Rob Batista

Dunkin'

Michael Bullock

Athlete

Kevin Colman

Hasbro

Allison Gray

Athlete

Jack Hayes

Brown University

Amira Jackson

Parent of an Athlete

Elwood Johnson

Police Chief

David Licciardi

Mortgage Co.

Tom Maggiacomo

Insurance Co. Owner

Bo Mathews

Owner of Communications Co.

Antonio Moreira

Bank of America

Stephanie Palladini

Alex & Ani

Amity Rubeor

Doctor

Cia Tucci

CVS Health

James Gilcreast

Knights of Columbus

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? No
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? No
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 7/29/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Decline to state
Gender identity
Male
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 04/04/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.