United Way of Central and Northeastern Connecticut

LIVE UNITED

aka United Way Inc.   |   Hartford, CT   |  www.unitedwayinc.org

Mission

Our mission is to engage and bring together people and resources committed to the well-being of children and families in our community.

Ruling year info

1934

President and CEO

Paula S. Gilberto

Main address

30 Laurel Street

Hartford, CT 06106 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

United Way of the Capital Area

EIN

06-0646653

NTEE code info

Fund Raising Organizations That Cross Categories includes Community Funds/Trusts and Federated Giving Programs) e.g. United Way (T70)

Fund Raising and/or Fund Distribution (S12)

Public, Society Benefit - Multipurpose and Other N.E.C. (W99)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

ALICE is an acronym for Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed. ALICE households struggle to afford basic necessities, including food, childcare, transportation, healthcare and housing, despite being employed and working hard. In our region, one in three families are considered ALICE households, living above the poverty line but unable to make ends meet. ALICE individuals and families reside in every town in our state. United Way is a champion for ALICE families and contributions to United Way will help prepare children for academic success, connect people with good jobs and provide immediate emergency assistance to families in need.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Youth Success

Children are ready for school and stay on track, graduating on time prepared for college or career.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Families

People learn financial skills and qualify for good-paying jobs with opportunities for advancement.

Population(s) Served
Families
Children and youth

Promote access to quality health care and wellness opportunities for children and families.

Population(s) Served
Families
Children and youth

People who are going through tough times get the assistance they need, such as food and shelter.

Population(s) Served

Reduce racial disparities in educational, economic, and health outcomes for people in central and northeastern Connecticut.

Population(s) Served

Help families recover from the long-term economic and educational impacts of COVID-19.

Population(s) Served
Families
Children and youth
Families
Children and youth
Families
Children and youth

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of children in quality early childhood education programs who gained skills needed to succeed in kindergarten, such as language and literacy skills.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Access to Health

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Goal: Children graduate high school college and career ready. Objective: Students enter the fourth grade reading proficiently.

Number of youth who improved their academic performance related to grade-level standards.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Access to Health

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Goal: Children graduate high school college and career ready. Objective: Students enter the fourth grade reading proficiently.

Number of middle grade students acquired the academic skills needed for high school success.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Access to Health

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Goal: Children graduate high school college and career ready. Objective: Students enter the fourth grade reading proficiently.

Number of individuals who improved their education and employment potential.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Youth Success

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Goal: Families are financially secure. Objective: Adults obtain and retain jobs that offer family sustaining wages and career advancement.

Number of individuals who attained industry-specific credentials or certifications.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Youth Success

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Goal: Families are financially secure. Objective: Adults obtain and retain jobs that offer family sustaining wages and career advancement.

Number of people in job training programs secured employment.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Youth Success

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Goal: Families are financially secure. Objective: Adults obtain and retain jobs that offer family sustaining wages and career advancement.

Number of individuals who increased their disposable income by accessing benefits.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Youth Success

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Goal: Families are financially secure. Objective: Individuals and families increase their financial capability to achieve short- and long-term goals.

Number of people who were connected to emergency resources such as rent/utility assistance, medical equipment, clothing or transportation assistance to better make ends meet.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Family Financial Security

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Goal: Basic Needs are met.

Number of people who received emergency shelter.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Family Financial Security

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Goal: Basic Needs are met.

Number of people who found safety/services related to sexual assault or domestic violence.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Family Financial Security

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Goal: Basic Needs are met.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

United Way of Central and Northeastern Connecticut is taking on some of the biggest challenges of our region: ensuring that children graduate high school, college and career ready; ensuring that families become more financially secure; connecting families with health services, supporting healthier beginnings and healthier lives; and providing people with food, shelter, and other essential services and resources. Each area presents an opportunity for philanthropic investment that will produce a significant social return.

Utilizing innovative approaches and the latest research, we find the best ways to bring people together to solve the issues that matter most. By spearheading new community change models and leveraging funding from public and private sources, we have achieved positive outcomes in our community. United Way supports the work of more than 50 innovative partner organizations, and serves as a leader and/or member of several community initiatives throughout our region that focus on early literacy, middle grade success, family financial stability, and health.

We believe that not one organization alone can solve the complex challenges facing children and families in our region. As such, we strive to bring together the right mix of partners and resources to tackle these issues. United Way is uniquely positioned to mobilize community members to give, advocate and volunteer on behalf of the causes they care about. We are able to bring together the human and financial resources needed to work together on challenges unique to our local communities. The foundation of our funding strategy is ongoing research of best practices and a volunteer-driven process for vetting partner organizations. We also seek to develop organizations' capacity to deliver the effective services, and to align organizations and resources to achieve positive community results at a broad scale.

Last year, we invested $6.4 million in programs/initiatives that benefitted over 260,000 residents.

Children accessed high quality early learning programs, including early language and literacy supports, as well as in-school and out-of-school time supports, and summer learning opportunities that improved reading and academic skills. Individuals received employment services, financial coaching, and connection to benefits. Services included: financial coaching, benefits screening, credit counseling, employment/career development, tax preparation, matched savings accounts, and resource and referral. Families accessed immediate, emergency assistance including (as examples): information and referrals through 2-1-1 and emergency resources such as rent, utility and transportation assistance.

In addition, we act as both a leader and partner in several initiatives in Hartford, including: Hartford Campaign for Grade Level Reading – a cross-sector partnership to ensure children are reading on grade level by the end of third grade; Hartford Generation Work, bridging workforce systems to benefit young adults ages 18-29, and developing professional capacity of workforce development leaders; Hartford Working Cities Challenge, connecting and preparing young adults in the South End of Hartford to local anchor institution employers; and North Hartford Triple Aim Collaborative – the health and wellbeing work group for the North Hartford Promise Zone.

United Way also mobilized nearly 6,000 volunteers around (as examples): Literacy Kit projects – building children's libraries at home/classroom; United Way Readers – matching volunteer readers with students behind in reading; one-time read aloud activities; and VITA (Volunteer Income Tax Assistance) – providing free tax preparation services by IRS certified volunteers.

Financials

United Way of Central and Northeastern Connecticut
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

United Way of Central and Northeastern Connecticut

Board of directors
as of 11/4/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Donald Allan, Jr.

Stanley Black & Decker, Inc.


Board co-chair

Vittoria Pace

The Hartford

Michael Auseré

Eversource

Steven Casey

Eversource

Peter Collins

Travelers

Mario Conjura

Chair, Windham Region United Way Advisory Board People's United Bank

Eric Daniels

Robinson+Cole

Shellye Davis

Greater Hartford Labor Coalition AFL-CIO

William Dowling

Chair, United Way of New Britain and Berlin Regional Advisory Board Wachtel Missry LLP

Pail Duff

Collins Aerospace and International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers Local Lodge 743

Venton Forbes

FaithCare, Inc.

Eric Galvin

Chair, 2019 United Way Community Campaign ConnectiCare

Greg Toczydlowski

Travelers

Paula Gilberto

President and Secretary, United Way of Central and Northeastern Connecticut

Courtney Jinjika

KeyBank

Robert Kosior

ConnectiCare, Inc. & Affiliates

Shawn Maynard

Windham Hospital Foundation

Colleen McGuire

Silver Fern Healthcare LLC

Natalie Morris

United Technologies Corporation

James O'Meara

Ex Officio, Former Board Chair Webster Bank

Vittoria Pace

The Hartford

Roshan Patel

Bank of America

Susan Tully

NBCUniversal, WVIT

Cynthia Ryan

Cigna

Vi Smalley, Esq.

Conning

Donna Sodipo

YWCA Hartford Region

Richard Tavolieri

Deloitte & Touche LLP

Anden Utzinger

Grant Thornton LLP

Maureen Waterston

Pratt & Whitney

Jaime Young

Aetna, a CVS Health Company

Anden Utzinger

Grant Thornton LLP

Lyn Walker

Shipman & Goodman LLP

Peter Collins

Travelers

Susan Tully

NBCUniversal, WVIT

Anden Utzinger

Grant Thornton LLP

Lyn Walker

Shipman & Goodman LLP

Peter Collins

Travelers

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Not applicable

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 11/04/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 11/04/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.