LifeBridge Community Services, Inc.

aka Formerly known as FSW, Inc.   |   Bridgeport, CT   |  https://www.lifebridgect.org

Mission

LifeBridge Community Services is a 170 year-old social service agency whose mission is "partnering with Bridgeport's youth and families to build resilience". Our vision is that "Bridgeport's youth and families reach their full potential within a stronger community."

Ruling year info

1934

Interim President and CEO

Mr. Frank Farias

Main address

475 Clinton Ave

Bridgeport, CT 06605 USA

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Formerly known as

Family Services Woodfield, Inc.

FSW, Inc.

EIN

06-0646974

NTEE code info

Youth Development Programs (O50)

Community Mental Health Center (F32)

Family Services (P40)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Bridgeport residents are among some of the poorest in Connecticut. There are nearly 34,000 children living in Bridgeport which has a population of 149,000. One in three children live in poverty. For families, especially black and brown families who have experienced job loss at a disproportionately higher rate, the pandemic has hit a struggling populace especially hard. Before COVID, Bridgeport had an unemployment rate of 6.2%, significantly higher than the US average is 3.9%. Bridgeport has seen the job market decrease by -0.3% over the last year. Future job growth which had been predicted to be 21.9% over the next 10 years, still lower than the US average of 33.5%, is now a deep unknown. Businesses are closing, jobs are disappearing, and the rate of recovery for the city is precarious at best. For children, the forecast is bleak—almost 50% are being raised by a single parent, 11% of youth ages 18-24 did not graduate from high school, 100% qualify for free/reduced breakfast/lunch.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Urban Scholars Program

The Urban Scholars Program assists youth residing in the West End of Bridgeport, ages 12-14, by providing them with an array of academically engaging activities designed to promote learning and prosocial behaviors in a way that young people will find enjoyable. The Urban Scholars Program also integrates behavioral health services. Our goal is to help youth as they navigate life’s challenges and increase their opportunities to build resiliency.

All services are delivered at no cost. Each student attending the After School Program engages in fun, stimulating activities from 3:00 PM – 7:00 PM Monday – Friday and from 10:30 AM – 2:30 PM one Saturday each month. We provide additional programming on scheduled school closings. The following components are offered to youth at The Urban Scholars Program: Tutoring, Martial Arts, Music, Computer Programming and Coding, Robotics, and Leadership Development.

Population(s) Served
At-risk youth
Preteens
Adolescents
Economically disadvantaged people

LifeBridge helps adults, youths, and families by providing the tools that strengthen their ability to cope, adapt, and overcome challenges. Our comprehensive services support people struggling with personal issues, family challenges, domestic violence, trauma, loss, and unemployment. We operate the only walk-in behavioral health clinic in the Greater Bridgeport area.

In addition to offering behavioral health services in our Bridgeport office, LifeBridge also operates Fairfield Counseling Services Inc. located on 125 Penfield Road in Fairfield. Both organizations share a commitment to providing a comprehensive range of high-quality behavioral health services for adults, adolescents and families.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Our Sign Language Interpreting Services is the lead provider of sign language interpreting, and for over 20 years has been providing medical, educational, business, legal, and community-based interpreting services throughout Connecticut. All of our interpreters are registered with the State of Connecticut according to state statue. Our certified interpreters are available 365 days of the year for all interpreting needs based on availability. Website: SignLanguageCT.org

Population(s) Served
People with hearing impairments

LifeBridge Community Services provides well-balanced meals to individuals 60 years of age or older in the Greater New Haven area. In addition to addressing the nutritional need of the homebound elderly, LifeBridge also operates 16 Senior Community Cafés in the Greater New Haven area as well as a Senior Dine Dining program at the Greek Olive. This provides an alternative to dining at our traditional senior community cafés by offering a fixed menu of 8 entrées. Website: SeniorMealsCT.org

Population(s) Served
Seniors

Where we work

Accreditations

Council on Accreditation (COA) 2013

Awards

Neighborhood Builders Award 2013

Bank of America Foundation

Affiliations & memberships

National Alliance of Children and Families 2014

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

To address the most critical needs of the people of Bridgeport, LifeBridge has aligned its service offerings to deliver on its mission of partnering with Bridgeport’s youth and families to build resilience. Our approach is to provide a helping hand up through opportunities that have lasting impact. Structured to address the holistic needs of youth and their families, key services are offered in three areas: The Center for Youth Development, the Family Resource Center, and a robust Integrated Behavioral Health program.

LifeBridge has realigned it programming as it has over the pat 170 years, to best meet the needs of the community it serves. Our goals are to be a resource for psychological, emotional and family support. We aspire to give young people the tools they need to expand their horizons and ensure their continued success in school and to dream big.

We are providing families with skill building opportunities that will result in better paying jobs and a safer more stable family home as we strive to meet their immediate needs regarding food, clothes and shelter.

For those struggling with mental and behavioral health issues, our goal is to help them feel safe when they get up each day and not live in fear of what the day might hold.

The Center for Youth Development is designed to provide young people in 6th through 8th grade the opportunity to experience enrichment opportunities that will inspire curiosity, expand their knowledge of the world and the various cultures around them, and empower them to explore their own creativity. Hands-on STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, Math) activities enable them to develop key life and critical thinking skills while honing their ability to lead and excel in life, thus addressing systemic life challenges at a strategically early stage in their growth and maturity.

Family Resource Center is focused on providing a holistic approach to connecting families with the help they need to become resilient and provide safe, supportive homes for their children. One in every three children in Bridgeport lives in poverty, so helping parents to receive the resources they need, whether it is food, clothing, or counseling support, is vital in helping the family as a whole and in preparing children for success.

Integrated Behavioral Health programs offered in Fairfield and at the Bridgeport headquarters provided services to 1,700 individuals this past year. These services included coordinated health care, psychiatric evaluation, help and treatment for substance use disorder, and individual and family counseling. All of these services were provided by a team of licensed clinical professionals working in collaboration to ensure that individualized service plans addressed the needs of the whole person rather than addressing a singular issue.

Founded in 1849, LifeBridge has been dedicated to providing services to greater Bridgeport’s most vulnerable and disadvantaged populations for over 170 years. Services and programs have evolved over time to meet the emerging needs of a changing community.

LifeBridge serves up to 10,000 individuals a year through its core programming and subsidiaries. It employs a staff of 100 highly qualified professionals in their fields.

Urban Scholars program kicked off early in 2020. To date the program has served 54 young people in grades 6th - 8th by providing Summer Camp and After School opportunities. Programming is focused on engagement in STEAM activities to enable them to develop key life and critical thinking skills while honing their ability to lead and excel in life, thus addressing systemic life challenges at a strategically early stage in their growth and maturity.

In the past year, the Family Resource Center served people through a variety of support services:
1,000 individuals accessed basic needs items through the Community Closet.
268 moms and dads took advantage of the Diaper Bank.
70 adults were able to improve their work-readiness skills.

Integrated Behavioral Health services include coordinated psychiatric evaluations, help and treatment for substance use disorder, and individual and family counseling. All of these are provided by a team of licensed clinical professionals working together to address the needs of the whole person. 1,700 people accessed services this past year, in order to achieve their highest level of wellness.

Working from a Board adopted Strategic Plan for 2019-2022, LifeBridge has already aligned programming into the three identified core service areas: The Center for Youth Development, The Family Resource Center and Integrated Behavioral Health services. The Urban Scholars program which is key to the Center for Youth Development kicked off in early 2020, provided a Summer Day Camp and has just commenced the 2020/2021 fall/spring After School Program. Provided free of charge, the program is expected to serve 50+ students. Behavioral Health has internally shifted to a team approach so that clinicians treat the whole person in a client-centered approach to treatment.

LifeBridge plans to continue to expand its youth programming to reach both younger and older students and strengthen offerings through the Family Resource Center. A new website and re-branding will roll out by year end of 2020 that reflects the agency's renewed focus on helping families build resilience.

LifeBridge has been serving the community for 170 years. Beginning as an agency focused on widows and orphans it has grown, expanded and changed as the needs of the community have changed. It is our expectation that this continued adaptation and growth will continue to be part of the fabric of the organization and our new alignment of services is a critical next step that will make a lasting impact on the people we serve.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Youth Families with children People with behavioral health issues Seniors All minorities and those who are economically challenged

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    We upgraded our reception area and counseling offices to provide a more positive experience for behavioral health clients and to allow for appropriate social distancing. We also adapt and improve youth programming based on feedback from parents and caregivers.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection,

Financials

LifeBridge Community Services, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

LifeBridge Community Services, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 11/9/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. George Kasper

LifeBridge Community Services

Term: 2020 - 2022

Ellen Tower

LifeBridge Community Services

Steve Finnegan

LifeBridge Community Services

George Kasper

LifeBridge Community Services

Thomas Travers

LifeBridge Community Services

Kenneth Weinstein

LifeBridge Community Services

Jeanne Breen

LifeBridge Community Services

Brian Kelly

LifeBridge Community Services

Laura Coughlin

LifeBridge Community Services

Lawrence Ganim

LifeBridge Community Services

John Lombardi, Ph.D.

LifeBridge Community Services

Paul Timpanelli

LifeBridge Community Services

Harold Trischman, Jr.

LifeBridge Community Services

Anne Diamond

LifeBridge Community Services

Jayme Stevenson

LifeBridge Community Services

Dara Richards, MD

LifeBridge Community Services

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? No
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? No
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? No
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 11/09/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data