Connecticut Association for Human Services

aka CAHS   |   Hartford, CT   |  www.cahs.org

Mission

CAHS improves opportunity and prosperity for Connecticut’s children and families by shaping policies and programs that significantly and measurably reduce poverty and promote a secure future.  We are inspired by a belief in shared prosperity and the vision of a Connecticut where all children and families thrive and, regardless of income level, contribute to and share in Connecticut’s growth. 

Ruling year info

1954

CEO

Mr. John P. Merz

Main address

110 Bartholomew Ave Suite 4020

Hartford, CT 06106 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

06-0653158

NTEE code info

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (P01)

Consumer Protection and Safety (W90)

Kindergarten, Nursery Schools, Preschool, Early Admissions (B21)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Connecticut Money School (CMS)

The Connecticut Money School (CMS)  provides free financial education for adults, young adults, and seniors  We believe that everyone should have the opportunity to become financially independent. We ensure that students receive a high standard of financial education that will help them work towards a prosperous future.
 CMS is a community-based initiative created to promote economic stability for low to moderate income individuals Connecticut.  Nearly 100 instructors with financial backgrounds teach our classes. Topics covered include: debt, savings, basic budgeting, credit, loans, health care, homeownership, saving for college, and senior issues (long-term care, retirement, fraud prevention).  We have recently added a Spanish language and online version, covering a broad range of topics. CAHS also operates the Youth Money School, which offers financial education for teens and young adults, including workshops on budgeting, credit and paying for college.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Seniors

Since 2004, CAHS has organized coalitions of VITA sites across Connecticut.  VITA programs provide alternatives to paid and predatory tax preparation in low-income communities. The IRS estimates that federal Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) filers in Connecticut that used paid preparers pay $273 on average. In addition to paying high fees for tax preparation, the IRS estimates that 20% of those eligible for the EITC do not take advantage of it, leaving millions of dollars in unclaimed credits each year. VITA sites ensure that residents have access to a free tax service that will screen for refunds and tax credits, without offering high interest loans or administrative fees. This service keeps refunds and credits in the hands of low and moderate-income families, and in their communities. Since 2020, CAHS VITA programming has also ensured eligible filers have received Federal stimulus payments to which they are entitled and eligible families are enrolled to receive the Child Tax Credit.

Population(s) Served
Families
Adults
Economically disadvantaged people
Unemployed people
Veterans

Bank On Connecticut seeks to serve state residents who are unbanked or underbanked, linking them to safe and affordable accounts.  CAHS works with the Cities for Financial Empowerment Fund, which has created National Account Standards that include low monthly fees and no overdraft fees.  CAHS is building a coalition of financial institutions to create and promote these accounts, in partnership with community based organizations throughout the state that help to reach out to residents to enroll.  This helps prevent residents from using costly check cashing services, and overcomes the cost barriers that prevent families from accessing mainstream financial services that support their progress in saving, paying bills, and reaching major financial goals such as home ownership, education, and retirement.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Immigrants and migrants
Adults
Incarcerated people

Every day, CAHS works to advance policies that help make sure every family and every child has an equal opportunity to thrive and share in prosperity. Our policy work is centered around multigenerational opportunities, addressing the interconnected needs of parents and children. We coordinate with grass roots partners to advocate for policies and programs that build greater and more stable self-sufficiency among lower-income families, and a stronger foundation for their children.

Additionally, we organize early childhood providers and advocates throughout Connecticut to create a more just, fair and equitable field in which providers of early childhood services are adequately paid for their services and those who use their services are not unduly burdened by cost-prohibitive fees, and children receive high quality early care and education experiences.

Population(s) Served
Infants and toddlers
Parents
Economically disadvantaged people

The Returning Citizens Program engages individuals who are six months to a year from being released and/or are currently in reentry programs. Using the CAHS Connecticut Money School curriculum, the program will focus on preventing soon-to-released individuals from struggling with money or other financial issues. Bills and debts DO accumulate during incarceration. Struggle with financial barriers for the re-entry community increases recidivism rates are, for example, people who have been incarcerated have a 69% drop in credit scores, resulting in both pre and post-incarceration debts, which impact access to housing, employment, and financial products, and increases the likelihood of recidivism by 15–20%.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Economically disadvantaged people
Incarcerated people

Where we work

Financials

Connecticut Association for Human Services
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
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Connecticut Association for Human Services

Board of directors
as of 06/07/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Emily Wood

CT Wealth Management

Term: 2020 - 2022

Cynthia McKenna

Catholic Charities, Archdiocese of Hartford

Lily Lopez

Citi Community Development

John Cannon

Emily Wood

CT Wealth Management

Terence Floyd

Wells Fargo

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 6/2/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, or other sexual orientations in the LGBTQIA+ community
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 06/02/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.