PLATINUM2024

Eno Center for Transportation

aka Eno Transportation Foundation   |   Washington, DC   |  http://www.enotrans.org

Mission

The Eno Center for Transportation (Eno) was founded in 1921 by William Phelps Eno (1859-1945), who pioneered the field of traffic management in the United States and Europe. Today, Eno focuses on all modes of transportation, with the mission of shaping public debate on critical multimodal transportation issues and building an innovative network of transportation professionals. We pursue this mission through conducting independent, nonpartisan research and analysis and high-quality professional development programs.

Ruling year info

1942

Principal Officer

Robert Puentes

Main address

1629 K Street, NW Suite 200

Washington, DC 20006 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Eno Foundation for Highway Traffic Regulation, Inc.

Eno Foundation for Highway Traffic Control, Inc.

EIN

06-0662124

NTEE code info

Research Institutes and/or Public Policy Analysis (W05)

Management & Technical Assistance (U02)

Leadership Development (W70)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990-PF.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

This is a time of great dynamic changes in the transportation industry. Technology is being deployed that has the possibility to enable greater efficiency and more mobility options. Today, ubiquitous wireless network availability and an ever-growing array of mobile applications have created an environment in which information systems, shared vehicles, and on-demand services play an increasing role in metropolitan transportation. The potential impact is vast, with both positive and negative effects that need to be understood. In many cities and metropolitan areas, the emphasis on the ease of reaching valued destinations is essential because it represents the ultimate desired outcome of a transportation system. Funding challenges loom large, especially when the needs to rebuild highway systems and invest in transit systems are growing. Federal discretionary and mandatory programs both face significant shortfalls in the next three years. But while federal investments are strained, states

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Professional Development Programs

Eno’s professional development programs are centered on understanding the transportation workforce, identifying emerging talent, encouraging the next generation of leaders, and developing quality educational opportunities. Eno offers a full spectrum of practical and leadership skill building programs to help transportation professionals at every rung of the career ladder. Since its inception, Eno has instructed over 3,500 transportation professionals. Our alumni network connects people and ideas to enhance cross-industry knowledge, strengthen organizations, and inspire transportation professionals.

Population(s) Served
Adults

The Eno Center for Transportation conducts research, organizes workshops, and convenes transportation experts on a variety of critical issues facing the transportation industry. Eno’s policy team takes an independent approach to all of our work, and we create pragmatic policy recommendations that are responsive to constrained public resources and political realities. To ensure accuracy, objectiveness, and effectiveness of our final products, we work closely with industry stakeholders and experts, including Eno’s working groups, project advisory panels, the Digital Cities Project Advisory Board, Eno’s Board of Advisors, and Eno’s Board of Directors. The members of these working groups or advisory boards help to develop Eno research topics, inform the work, and comment on findings. Importantly, Eno includes both public and private sector officials on each board to ensure that our work products are balanced and useful to policymakers and industry alike.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of press articles published

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Research & Policy

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

ETW is the leading source of transportation policy insights for Congressional staff, government affairs professionals, transit agencies, USDOT, and agencies across the Executive Branch.

Number of research or policy analysis products developed, e.g., reports, briefs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Research & Policy

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Eno’s policy team takes an independent approach to all of our work, and we create pragmatic policy recommendations that are responsive to constrained public resources and political realities.

Number of advocate or trained spokesperson citations in the media

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Research & Policy

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Because our core values – independence, collaboration, relevance, excellence, and entrepreneurialism – are reflected in all of our work, Eno is a trusted source for the media on transportation issues.

Number of groups/individuals benefiting from tools/resources/education materials provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Professional Development Programs

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The metric is the number of people who attended our educational webinar series.

Number of list subscribers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Eno's vision is for an American transportation system that fosters economic vitality and improves the quality of life for all.

STRATEGIC GOALS
1. Ensure our rigorous and independent research and analysis informs solutions and decision-making on critical multimodal transportation issues

2. Build and engage a world-class network of innovative transportation leaders

3. Expand professional development programs to fill needs and gaps in the industry

4. Broaden Eno's influence to reach state, regional, and local levels and corporations

5. Invest in essential building blocks for success

At Eno, we embrace an affirmative vision of what is possible in everything we do--exemplifying Eno’s values of integrity, independence, objectivity, quality, and relevance. As we approach our centenary, we have an opportunity to both celebrate the past and plan for the future. Eno can look back on a long and proud history as a thought-leader in national transportation policy with a strong training and leadership program. We enjoy a truly unique position as the hub of a network of transportation industry leaders with a smart and dedicated staff and a solid reputation for credible, independent, and impactful work.

To achieve our vision for a transportation system that fosters economic vitality and improves the quality of life for all, we adhere to a four-part theory of change:

• Conduct Rigorous Research and Independent Analysis. We study critical issues in transportation, providing unassailable data and analyses that shape solutions and inform decision-making.
• Practice insights. We translate our research into on‐the‐ ground knowledge and action, pilot new strategies, and codify those learnings through new tools and resources that ultimately lead to solutions that can be adapted and scaled.
• Public and private‐sector reforms. We encourage government at all levels, and private‐sector firms and philanthropies to adopt policy reforms and actions that facilitate innovations and solutions.
• Act as the Hub of an Extensive Network of Transportation Leaders. We convene and empower cross‐sector networks of government, business, nonprofit, and philanthropic leaders at all levels who work together to solve problems, develop new solutions, and advocate for broader reforms. In order to maximize impact, we employ deliberate communications and outreach strategies to ensure the work reaches intended audiences.

The Eno Center for Transportation is an independent, non-partisan think tank whose mission is to shapes public debate on critical multimodal transportation issues and build an innovative network of transportation professionals. The leader in its field for nearly a century, Eno provides government and industry leaders with timely research and an independent voice on policy issues. Eno publishes rigorous, objective analyses on the problems facing transportation and provides ideas for and a clear path toward possible solutions. In addition, for nearly two decades, Eno Transportation Weekly (ETW) has been the premiere inside-the-beltway federal transportation policy publication for transportation leaders across the country.

Through its professional development programs, Eno cultivates creative and visionary leadership by giving public and private transportation leaders the tools and training they need to succeed. Since its inception, Eno has instructed over 3,500 transportation professionals. Eno can look back on a long and proud history as a thought-leader in national transportation policy with a strong training and leadership program. We enjoy a truly unique position as the hub of a network of transportation industry leaders with a smart and dedicated staff and a solid reputation for credible, independent, and impactful work.

In an era where transportations role is central to global sustainability, economic vitality, and community well-being, Eno stands at the forefront of shaping the future through its policy and practice impact. Our work in this domain is driven by a deep commitment to inform and improve the regulatory, legislative, and governance landscapes of transportation. Through our comprehensive policy initiatives, we collaborate with a diverse array of stakeholders to forge solutions that are practical and forward-looking.

At Eno, we leverage our research, leadership programs, and extensive network to help ensure that transportation policy and practice are both responsive to current needs and adaptable to future challenges. Our efforts are designed to catalyze a transportation ecosystem that is safe, efficient, and accessible for all.

Our annual impact report at impact.enotans.org highlights the strides weve made over the past year in policy and practice. It is a testament to the power of collaboration and the collective expertise of the Eno team, our partners, and the broader transportation community. Together, we are not just witnessing change; we are driving it, ensuring that our shared vision for a better transportation future becomes a reality.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time

Financials

Eno Center for Transportation
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Eno Center for Transportation

Board of directors
as of 03/27/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

James Burnley

Keith Parker

Mary Peters

Emeritus

Martin Whitmer

Marjorie Dickman

Carolyn Flowers

Karen Rae

Jennifer Aument

Jannet Walker-Ford

Diane Woodend-Jones

Thomas Prednergast

AECOM

Roger Nober

K. Jane Williams

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? No
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 3/21/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Gender identity
Male, Not transgender

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 03/21/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.