PLATINUM2022

Family & Children's Agency, Inc.

aka FCA   |   Norwalk, CT   |  www.FamilyandChildrensAgency.org

Mission

Building better lives and strengthening our community by providing essential human services to children, families, adults and seniors.

Ruling year info

1994

President & CEO

Mr. Robert F. Cashel LCSW

Executive Vice President & COO

Ms. Mary Ellen Hass LCSW

Main address

9 Mott Ave 4th Fl

Norwalk, CT 06850 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Family and Children's Aid of Mid-Fairfield County, Inc.

EIN

06-0970985

NTEE code info

Human Service Organizations (P20)

Children's and Youth Services (P30)

Family Services (P40)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

FCA works to build better lives for vulnerable members of our community through a strength-based service philosophy that guides programming in seven core areas of service. • Foster Care for children with medical and/or behavioral health needs • Family Support services including home visitation services for high-risk families, pregnant women, and new parents • Adoption services that are both domestic and foreign as well as post-placement support • ASPIRE, an after school program that supports at-risk youth in middle and high school • Behavioral Health programs which include Project REWARD, a substance abuse program for women and IICAPS (Intensive In-home Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Services) • Community Connections programs for individuals experiencing homelessness including case management and supportive housing • Home Care including Live-In and a Personal Alert Service for the elderly and disabled

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

ASPIRE

ASPIRE is an after-school and summer enrichment program working with middle and high school students to motivate and educate them through academic engagement, parent education and social-emotional skill building. It is a multi-faceted, longitudinal program (from 6th to 12th grade) that promotes academic success and positive youth development. All students participating in ASPIRE are: considered "at-risk" as they face two or more barriers to success, including:

• racial/ethnic minority status,
• low-income,
• low academic achievement/learning issues,
• and other family challenges.

Half of the students in the Norwalk public school system are considered to be low-income, and of these low-income students, only 30% perform at or above goal level on the statewide standardized tests as compared to nearly 75% of their peers scoring at or above goal level (Connecticut Council for Education Reform). This type of programming is not only critical but effective: over the past three years 100% of ASPIRE’s graduating twelfth graders not only completed high school in four years but went on to college/vocational training. Because this programming receives no public funding, and nominal sliding scale program fees only cover approximately 5% of the budgeted expenses, ASPIRE relies heavily on grant and charitable dollars to cover expenses.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
Adults

Child & Family Development programs focus on the critical early years of a child’s life (birth to age 8). These programs strengthen vulnerable families by:

• improving maternal and infant/child mental health,
• promoting healthy child development and effective parenting,
• reducing the potential for child abuse or neglect.

All programs are offered free of charge in English and Spanish to families in the Greater Norwalk area and are on a voluntary basis. The benefits of these programs are evident. In fact, while the 2014 Fall Kindergarten Inventory Assessment revealed that only 56% of Norwalk’s incoming students were ready for kindergarten, most recently over 85% of children participating in FCA’s Child & Family Development programming remained developmentally on track or showed improvement. FCA must raise funding in grants and private charitable contributions each year to ensure that these services and benefits will continue.

Population(s) Served
Families
Infants and toddlers

FCA is one of the largest private adoption agencies in Connecticut, offering international, domestic and foster care adoption services including practical assistance and emotional support through each phase of the adoption process including birth parent counseling and post adoption services. Over 70 years of providing adoption services, Family & Children’s Agency has placed more than 4,000 children with their forever families. Last year 100%of children FCA placed for adoption achieved permanency. Adoption programs are funded primarily through fee for service.

Population(s) Served
Families

Foster Care programs are designed for children with serious medical, emotional or
behavioral disorders. In FY2016-2017 there were 468 children and youth in an out of home placement in Fairfield County. The Therapeutic Foster Care program provides homes for children who have been diagnosed with a serious psychiatric disorder. The Medically Complex Foster Care program secures homes for children with complex medical needs. Family & Community Ties, the highest level of therapeutic foster care available in Connecticut, is for children who have a long history of psychiatric hospitalizations and placement in residential treatment. The cost of foster care services are covered by grants provided by the Connecticut State Department of Children and Families.

Population(s) Served
Women and girls
Children and youth

Family Support programs promote the safety and well-being of all family members by building and maintaining primary family connections while linking families to community resources to prevent child abuse or neglect. In 2017, there were 1,863 substantiated child abuse/neglect claims in Fairfield County.
Working closely with the Department of Children and Families (DCF), Family Support provides strength-based in-home programs that assist parents to:
• prevent the recurrence of child abuse or neglect,
• improve parent-child relationships,
• identify natural support systems,
• ensure the needs of their children are being met.
Of high-risk home visiting families in these programs, 98% did not have a newly documented case of child abuse or neglect with DCF. While these programs are primarily funded through government grants, FCA must additionally raise additional funds each year through private grants and charitable contributions.

Population(s) Served
Women and girls
Children and youth

Outpatient Behavioral Health therapists work in a variety of treatment modalities –individual, family, and group therapy – and we are committed to the personal growth of our clients, encouraging collaboration in a safe, respectful environment. We work with individuals, children and families experiencing mental health, substance abuse and other challenges.

• Intensive In-Home Child & Adolescent Psychiatric Services (IICAPS) helps families dealing with children who have significant psychiatric needs and is designed to avoid in patient hospitalization.
• Project REWARD provides intensive outpatient substance abuse treatment specially designed for women.

Notably, Southwestern Fairfield County has the highest percentage of clients reporting use of opiates at admission to treatment (45%, as compared to 34%-39% in other regions). Of these clients, over 20% must travel outside the region for treatment. Access to care within this region is further limited by lack of treatment resources for women. Knowing that more than 85% of women in substance abuse treatment have histories of trauma, Project REWARD is equipped to best support women as they begin to heal from trauma and achieve sobriety.

Supplementing the funding for behavioral health services requires charitable support from private funders.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth

Community Connections programs have evolved to meet the dynamic needs of our clients by providing a range of programming with wrap-around supports. Connecticut’s 2018 Point in Time Count (PIT) counted 158 homeless adults in Norwalk. FCA provides one-on-one case management services to develop the skills clients need to:

• become self-sufficient,
• transition into stable, independent housing,
• access needed mental health or substance abuse treatment

While these programs receive government funding, FCA must raise additional funding from private funders each year to support Community Connections.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Families

Home Care services are expanding to meet the need of Fairfield County’s fastest growing age group, as the segment of the population 65 and over is projected to increase by 37% over the next 10 years. FCA’s Home Care services range from having the security of a personal alert button to having a full-time, live-in caregiver, allowing seniors to maintain their independence and avoid the move to a hospital or nursing home. Other offerings include:
• in-home caregivers,
• homemaking services,
• assisted transportation,
• family/caregiver support.

Last year, 98% of seniors receiving in-home services remained in their home, demonstrating the effectiveness of this program.

Finally, FCA delivers social work services to home care clients as 27% of seniors report symptoms of depression and, for those of low socioeconomic status, this number jumps to 48%. Our challenge however, is that less than 20% of the Social Work budget within Home Care is funded by the Southwestern Connecticut Agency on Aging (SWCAA), but requires additional funding to be raised through private donors in order to fully cover these services.

Population(s) Served
Seniors

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Percentage of clients who did not have a report of abuse/neglect made to DCF during our work with the family

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Family Support

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

FCA offers in-home services for vulnerable families to promote positive parenting, reduce exposure to toxic stress & create environments for children to thrive.

Percentage of ASPIRE high school students who graduate in four years

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

ASPIRE

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The Agency’s vision is a thriving community of empowered individuals and healthy families. To do so, the Agency offers more than 30 programs that meet needs across the lifespan and reach thousands of people annually.

Guided by the Agency’s strategic plan, FCA’s strategic goals are:
• Achieve transformative revenue growth by maximizing/diversifying all funding resources while elevating awareness of FCA as the premier human service provider.
• Increase program impact through data driven service delivery to meet the dynamic needs of the clients and communities we serve.
• Enhance workforce recruitment and expand professional development to attract and retain high performing talent while maintaining a positive organizational culture.
• Effectively meet community needs through internal integration, external collaboration and active participation in collective impact efforts.

In pursuit of our vision and mission, FCA provides a continuum of care for children, families, adults and seniors. We work to build families through our Foster Care and Adoption programs. We work to strengthen families through our Family Support and Child & Family Development programs (which includes an after school program, ASPIRE). We work to stabilize families through our Behavioral Health services and, for individuals experiencing homelessness, we offer a safe space to help them rebuild their lives through our Community Connections programs. Finally, we support families and the elderly with services to assist them throughout the aging process in our Home Care programs.

FCA is a family service organization with more than 75 years’ experience building better lives in Fairfield County and beyond. This acquired knowledge and expertise allows us to efficiently run one of the largest non-profits in Norwalk while delivering high quality services that achieve positive client outcomes. In fact, at FCA:
• 90 cents of every dollar goes directly to serving our clients
• For over 20 years, each year FCA has received a “clean opinion” by external auditing firms who found no material deficiencies in the Agency’s financial practices
• Our staff retention rate (both direct service and management) is over 85%
• We have been voted a Top Workplace several years in a row, an accolade based solely on employee feedback that measures leadership, flexibility, training, compensation & benefits, and growth opportunities
• We are fully accredited by the Council on Accreditation (COA) and the Hague Convention as well as licensed by the Connecticut Department of Children & Families and Connecticut Department of Public Health
• We invest in an infrastructure to support high-quality metrics and data analysis with a staff of 2FTEs working on quality improvement efforts

In FY21 alone, our services resulted in a significant impact in lower Fairfield County, including:

• FCA’s Child & Family Development programs promoted healthy child development and kindergarten readiness by using the Ages and Stages Questionnaire (ASQ) for early identification of developmental issues. Because of our screening and interventions, 83% of children remained on track or showed improvement in development via the ASQ.

• ASPIRE, our after-school program, bridged the opportunity gap through programming that uses a whole student approach for youth throughout their middle and high school careers. With this long-term, wrap around support, 100% of twelfth graders graduated in four years and 97% were enrolled in college or a vocational training program.

• The Agency’s Supportive Housing Services promoted self-sufficiency for adults transitioning out of homelessness and into housing. Through on-going support and case management, 100% of clients remained in FCA’s supportive housing or transitioned into permanent housing.

• The Agency’s Home Care services worked with older adults so they can live safely and independently and, last year, 99% of older adults receiving in-home services remained in their homes.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time

Financials

Family & Children's Agency, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
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  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Family & Children's Agency, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 11/03/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Rita McKenna Olson

No Affiliation

Term: 2021 -

Wenton Camporin

Charles Pieterse

Maria Wilcox

Rita McKenna Olson

Mark Lux

Kris Reddington Herlyn

Rachel Lieberman

Lisa Lillie

Virginia Martin

Kathleen P Murphy

Daniel O'Connor

Jordan Scott

Brian Vendig

David Barnard

Susan Beyman

Noelle Hughes

Denise Harned

Julene Greenshields

Brian Davidson

Cheryl DeVonish

Maureen Hart

Sean Lenahan

Martha Yepes Small, M.D.

Michael Stein

Martha Witte

Joel Clark

Richard Zaremski

Mary Ann Genuario

Bill Harris

Elizabeth Abel

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 11/2/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Decline to state
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Decline to state

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Decline to state
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

Transgender Identity

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 09/20/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.