Connecticut Trust For Historic Preservation

aka Preservation Connecticut   |   Hamden, CT   |  http://www.preservationct.org

Mission

Connecticut Trust for Historic Preservation DBA Preservation Connecticut preserves, protects, and promotes the buildings, sites, and landscapes that contribute to the heritage and vitality of Connecticut communities. For over four decades, we have successfully championed the protection of remarkable community assets all over the state by leveraging funding, advocating, forming partnerships, and promoting stewardship. We strive to make a big impact through our programs including technical assistance, grant funding, tax credit financing, advocacy efforts, historic resource surveys, and easement and legacy giving support. We also want to engage and inspire our partners, members, and p eople in communities of all demographics – from large, diverse cities to tiny rural towns – to preserve the places that shape and give meaning to our lives.

Ruling year info

1976

Executive Director

Ms. Jane Montanaro

Main address

940 Whitney Ave

Hamden, CT 06517 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

06-0979808

NTEE code info

Fund Raising and/or Fund Distribution (W12)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2020, 2019 and 2018.
Register now

Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Our strategic plan outlines 21 goals that continue existing programs but change the ways we fund, promote, and deliver them. Diversifying our sources of funding in the near term and building an endowment for the future are two of the plan's priorities. They respond to the realities of evaporating funding for historic preservation under the Community Investment Act (CIA). Our well-known re-grant programs, for example, grew and diversified in the past decade with steady financial support from the CIA and 1772 Foundation. PCT has been very effective at re-granting these dollars for basic planning, maintenance and repairs. But in light of an ongoing pandemic, state funding is sure to become tight. The plan recognizes our need to form relationships with new private funding partners.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Circuit Rider Program (Field Services)

The Circuit Riders, a program in partnership with the State Historic Preservation Office, promote the preservation and use of historic resources. Through the program, staff provides immediate, on-site assistance to historical societies, property owners, developers, elected officials, and local preservation commissions across the state. Circuit Riders provide technical assistance for preservation projects, response to emergency requests from communities facing the loss of important historic places to evaluate options and assist in negotiating either alternatives to demolition or suitable mitigation, financial guidance to help entities develop needed scopes of planning and capital work, and identify pertinent grants and loans, and facilitate training, workshops, and model ordinances to educate communities about preservation strategies. Given their position on the “front lines,” the Circuit Riders often hear of issues and identify trends earlier than anyone else in the state.

Population(s) Served
Adults

The Making Places program originated in the State's Investment in Connecticut: State Historic Preservation Plan 2011-2016, which recognized Connecticut’s “heritage in industry and manufacturing” and the challenges to preservation and rehabilitation resulting from environmental contamination, vacancy and other factors. The plan recommended a statewide survey of industrial buildings to list as many eligible industrial properties on the National Register in coming years to increase the number of industrial buildings eligible for tax credits, thereby encouraging their re-use. Consistent with these goals, PCT's Making Places program began in 2013 as a joint project with the State Historic Preservation Office to identify, document, and promote the re-use of Connecticut’s historic mills through historic resource inventory, preservation education, raising public awareness, and providing technical assistance.

Population(s) Served
Adults

In fall 2018, Wesleyan University Press published Connecticut Architecture: Stories of 100 Places, by Christopher Wigren, PCT's deputy director. The first comprehensive illustrated history of Connecticut architecture, the book features more than 200 illustrations and is organized thematically. Sections include concise entries that treat notable buildings, neighborhoods, and communities, emphasizing the importance of the built environment and its impact on our sense of place. The text highlights key architectural features and trends and relates buildings to the local and regional histories they represent. A project of PCT, the book reflects more than 30 years of fieldwork and research in statewide architectural survey and National Register of Historic Places programs. A book talk tour is still ongoing with over 50 completed talks all across the state.

Population(s) Served
Adults

PCT operates a preservation easement program that protects 39 properties covering over 90 acres, including office buildings in New Haven, condominium complexes in Norwich and New Milford, a number of single-family houses including one in Derby, and open land that provides historic settings for early farmhouses in Ledyard and Ashford. An easement is a legal agreement that grants a limited right to an organization, like the Trust, to protect the property from changes that are not in keeping with its historic, architectural, or natural character. By granting an easement, the property owner does not give ownership, control, or use of the property or the right to sell, donate, or bequeath the property. The easement is usually given in perpetuity, meaning that it stays with the property through successive owners. Our staff over 25 years of experience in tailoring easements to ensure long-term stewardship of historic properties. An easement endowment is used for enforcement costs.

Population(s) Served
Adults

The Connecticut Preservation Annual Awards honor outstanding achievements in protecting and enhancing Connecticut’s significant buildings, landscapes, and communities. Awards recognize achievement in significant efforts in the restoration, preservation or adaptive use of historic resources, consistent stewardship over time, sustainability practices in historic buildings, effective leadership in the field, and young preservationists who demonstrate involvement, achievement or potential in preservation.In 2018 and 2019, we gave 20 awards to projects all over Connecticut. Four of those awards (20%) were awarded in the Greater New Haven area to an assortment of preservation efforts including the restoration of Milford's Sanford-Bristol House, an outstanding rehabilitation project of a Victorian home in New Haven, and New Haven's federal courthouse.  This event also raises money through sponsorships.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Awards

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of list subscribers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Number of subscribers to our email list at the end of 2019.

Number of organizations applying for grants

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Circuit Rider Program (Field Services)

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The number of formal requests for grant funding for preservation planning and capital projects totaling over $800,000.

Total dollar amount of grants awarded

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Circuit Rider Program (Field Services)

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Total amount of grants awarded to nonprofits to plan preservation work and make capital repairs to historic places (funding provided by the Community Investment Act & The 1772 Foundation).

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

1. Diversify sources of revenue to provide stability, enabling PCT to sustain its mission through periods where one or another source of revenue is limited.

2. Address head-on the decline in preservation funding at the State level by finding new funding sources to continue our effective and successful grant programs.

3. Build a more visible presence in communities across the state by offering more events, more robust membership recruitment, and better communications.

4. Build on and expand programs like field services, advocacy, education, surveys and easements.

PCT has long excelled as a catalyst for worthwhile historic preservation in Connecticut but today it also holds additional importance as a force for economic development, jobs, and community revitalization. Throughout its history, PCT has grown every year in impact and relevance but, like any nonprofit, we see a changing world about us and we must respond accordingly.

We are looking to increase our partnerships in the community. Historic preservation has always gone hand-in-hand with affordable housing, urban revitalization, sustainability and tourism. We are working to align ourselves more closely with relevant industries, community programs and local needs.

We also have to diversify our funding as current sources are as uncertain as the times. Our mission does not waiver; our ability to act must stay intact as well. In these times of dwindling State support, our members are more important than ever to support historic preservation. In addition, we need to secure private funding, establish an endowment fund and create planned giving campaigns.

We are working to enhance how PCT communicates with the public. We are in the process of developing and integrating a formal communications strategy to ensure that it maximizes its potential to inspire and engage, while creating a foundation for long-term institutional stability and effectiveness.

In the coming year we will continue to research new ways of being more effective and broad reaching in the realization of our mission. We are truly a community organization and happy that we exist within such an informed, engaged and compassionate community as ours.

PCT is very fortunate to have a very congenial and consensus-directed board. Their approach is, how can we get things done, not how do we micromanage programs and projects. Committee meetings are essential venues for expressing and sorting out points of view. Board meetings are information packed, serious and lighthearted at the same time. The entire staff comes to board meetings and selected staff to committee meetings. The communication between board and staff is excellent and respect for each other is real.

For years, PCT has trumpeted preservation’s value via: a popular annual awards ceremony; a bimonthly newsletter; House Talks; seminars on everything from wood window repairs to local commission procedures; interactive websites (e.g., www.ctmills.org); and our award-winning 2019 book, Connecticut Architecture. Yet a 2017 survey of 326 members, partners, and grant/award recipients suggested that we needed to do more. We thus undertook a collaborative and ultimately unanimous process resulting in a name change, new logo, website overhaul, and communications training. A marketing consultant refined our elevator pitch and created our first-ever marketing materials. In addition, recent programs, like an upcoming barn photography competition and our sold-out “Historic and Green” conference, are laser-focused on engaging new audiences who love great places like we do. By logging media hits and fundraising yields, we know our efforts are making a difference.

Financials

Connecticut Trust For Historic Preservation
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Connecticut Trust For Historic Preservation

Board of directors
as of 2/25/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Professor Sara Bronin

UConn Law School

Term: 2018 - 2020

Mary Curran

Attorney

Ellen Gould

Community Volunteer

Henry Griggs

Deacon John Grave house, Madison

Garrett Heher

Community Volunteer

Charles Janson

Robinson and Cole, Darien

Edith Pestana

Environmental Justice, DEEP

Caroline Sloat

Community Volunteer

Elaine Stiles

Assistant Professor of Historic Preservation, Roger Williams University

Peter Stockman

Deep River Group

Greg Waterman

Bank of America

Richard Wies

Gregg, Wies and Gardner, architects

Ed Gerber

Community Volunteer

Tom Nissley

Community Volunteer

John Harrington

Catherine Osten

State Senator

Cristina Aguirre-Ross

Robert Tierney

Olivia White

Mary Jean Agostini

Garry Leonard

Deborah Cohen

Jonathan Wharton

Southern Connecticut State University

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? No
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? No
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? No
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 11/24/2020

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 11/24/2020

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.