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Kids In Crisis, Inc.

Ensuring the well-being of children through 24-hour services

aka KIC   |   Cos Cob, CT   |  http://www.kidsincrisis.org

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Mission

Kids In Crisis' mission is to building healthy communities where children and families thrive through prevention, counseling, and crisis services available 24-hours every day. To this end, Kids In Crisis provides free, round-the-clock crisis prevention counseling, with a 24/7 Crisis Helpline and immediate in-person intervention; a comprehensive, trauma-informed, positive youth development emergency shelter program for newborns to 18 year olds of any race, religion, ethnicity, gender identity, community of origin, sexual orientation, or socio-economic status; onsite school and community-based crisis prevention and counseling programs; and advocacy for children and families at the national, state, and local levels.

Notes from the nonprofit

Kids In Crisis(KIC) serves children throughout CT of all ages, races, religions, ethnicity, gender identities, sexual orientations, socio-economic levels, backgrounds and communities, and their families. Building and maintaining an inclusive organization is central to KICs mission and strategy. KIC has created and sustained a diverse and inclusive workplace reflecting the communities we serve. KICs commitment to diversity is seen in professional staff and the Board of Directors representative of the cultural and racial diversity of Connecticut children and families, plus communication of culturally sensitive informational tools, training, and practices (in English and Spanish). Women comprise 71% of the KIC Leadership Team and 42% of Board Members. KIC prohibits discrimination based on race, national or ethnic origin, religion, age, gender identity or expression, sexual orientation, socio-economic status, marital status, family status, veteran status or disability.

Ruling year info

1981

Executive Director

Ms. Shari Shapiro

Main address

One Salem St.

Cos Cob, CT 06807 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

06-1027885

NTEE code info

Children's and Youth Services (P30)

Temporary Shelter For the Homeless (L41)

Youth Development Programs (O50)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2023, 2022 and 2021.
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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Kids In Crisis' individualized crisis prevention/intervention services for newborns to 17 year olds address myriad needs. For example, last year the majority of calls to our 24/7 Crisis Helpline were due to severe family conflict, the child's mental health, and homelessness. 43% of the kids who entered our shelter care had involvement with state child protective services. 28% were homeless. Our TeenTalk program participants' needs comprised severe anxiety; depression; suicidal thoughts; self-harm; post-traumatic stress after abuse/neglect/rejection; family conflict; family/student substance use; homelessness; peer/societal pressures; sexual/gender questioning; and undiagnosed or neglected learning disabilities. Our SafeTalk program address young kids' needs to protect themselves from bullying and assault. The LGBTQ teens who attend our Lighthouse program often say it is the only place they feel safe "being themselves," sharing their concerns, and finding peers they can relate to.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Crisis Intervention

When children and families phone (203) 661-1911, trained Kids In Crisis counselors are available to provide immediate help in working through ANY situation, ANY time of the day or night.  They can meet face-to-face for crisis intervention and short-term counseling, provide for immediate needs, such as creating safety plans so children can remain at home safely while the families work on the identified issues, or accompanying to hospitals for needed care.  For families who need ongoing support, Kids In Crisis provides short-term counseling and referrals to a deep network of quality community services throughout the area.  When there is no safe and appropriate alternative for the children in the crisis situation, they may enter them into Kids In Crisis' Safe Haven for Kids Emergency Shelter Program.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Some children enter the SafeHaven for Kids Emergency Shelter Program (ESP) requiring intensive care to begin healing from trauma due to severe family conflict, neglect, abuse, rejection, homelessness, and other adverse events. Others may need a "time-out" until a family crisis becomes stabilized. Other kids require a safe, short-term "home" when families are unable to care for them (e.g., single parent’s hospitalization due to a medical emergency and no close-by competent extended family/friends).

The ESP provides a safe, nurturing, home-like environment, steeped in the principles of positive youth development; i.e. promoting protective factors and resiliency in children, using a strength-based approach. It provides cheerful, comfortable bedrooms and common areas, nutritious food, clean clothes, regular schedules of sleep, school, and play, age-appropriate chores, and consistent, staff trained in a trauma-informed approach to help traumatized kids stabilize and begin to heal.

Some resident children have received little to no basic medical care previously. Some need dental care or eyeglasses or have undiagnosed special needs. Few have received needed individual and family counseling. Shortly after intake, all new residents receive medical and mental health evaluations at the on-site Health Center. The Advanced Practice Nurse, psychologist, and psychiatrist identify and address each child's (often multiple) needs throughout their stays. As necessary, children are referred to local specialists, programs, or hospitals for treatment. Each child receives daily individual and group counseling in the shelter’s therapeutic milieu. Family counseling takes place on site as needed and able to achieve.

The ESP's Educational Services include assessment, development and maintenance of academic profiles, school transition assistance, advocacy for special needs testing and placement, tutoring, vocational assistance, extracurricular opportunities, transportation, and coordination of communication among all stakeholders. Preschoolers receive developmental assessments from local specialists as needed and attend developmental or therapeutic nursery programs based on their individual needs. Enrichment activities abound, and currently include art and pet therapy, yoga, ballroom dance, boxing, gym and outdoor sports, mindfulness/meditation, cultural events, and multi-cultural learning. Older residents perform regular community service. Volunteers visit regularly, providing homework help, specialized programming, and special meals for the kids.

While children are in residence staff work with families to clarify issues, provide and/or refer to family counseling, and connect them to long-term community-based resources, to enable children's safe return and ongoing well being at home. Social Workers educate families about strategies that enabled their kids to achieve progress and success while in residence. They work to guide the small number of children who need alternate placements to environments best suited to their needs.

Aftercare monitors children after discharge with emails, phone calls, and home and school visits, as appropriate, to ensure that they remain safe, continue to receive necessary support services, and help meet newly revealed or emergent needs. Children and families know that SafeHaven for Kids remains available to them any time they need support. Many stay in touch with trusted staff, sometimes for guidance in navigating difficult life situations, and also to proudly report achievements.

Children in crisis often grow up to be adults in crisis. Children who lack appropriate modeling for healthy parenting often continue to perpetuate these cycles with their own children. SafeHaven for Kids helps youth of all socio-economic levels and backgrounds with individualized care, and by connecting their families to critically needed resources. This resonates into the larger community, helping to promote a healthy, productive, engaged citizenry, reduce family and social conflicts and violence, and break generational cycles of mistreatment.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

KIC’s Emergency Shelter Program (ESP) is the only children’s shelter in CT that has a fully licensed onsite health clinic. Without it, treatment would only be available by transporting resident children to area hospital emergency rooms, a situation fraught with problems, including a lack of continuity in the medical care received by these kids. The TLC Health Center’s goal is to ensure that all children in the ESP receive immediate and ongoing high quality, comprehensive, consistent medical and mental health care.

Many children arrive at the ESP with pre-existing medical conditions, some of them severe and long-term. Many of the kids’ families lack adequate insurance and have not sought appropriate and necessary care. It is not uncommon for the ESP to serve kids who have had limited basic medical care and who have undiagnosed and neglected disabilities and conditions. KIC’s on-site medical services are essential to children’s ability to stabilize, begin to heal from trauma, and gain optimal growth and development once they leave KIC.

The TLC Health Center is licensed by the CT Dept. of Health. KIC contracts with Family Centers for the TLC’s licensed nurse practitioner (NP). She conducts initial physical exams for each child shortly after intake, identifies undiagnosed and neglected illnesses and conditions, provides routine and preventive care during the child’s stay, (exams, vaccinations, medication), and communicates with and refers to specialists for needs beyond her scope. She compiles complete medical records for each child. The TLC Health Center provides mental health assessments by the consulting psychologist and psychiatrist. They work with the NP and ESP social workers regarding mental health concerns, conduct emergency evaluations and make recommendations and referrals for ongoing mental health care while kids are in shelter and after they leave.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

SafeTalk is an assault and bullying prevention program, offered free to area elementary schools, for children in their kindergarten through fifth grade classrooms. SafeTalk's core message is that everyone has the right to live "Safe, Strong & Free." It teaches children how to make safe and healthy choices, stand up for themselves and for others, and how to seek help when needed. The presentations are lively, with lots of give and take discussion between the presenters and the children, and role playing to illustrate threats and protective strategies. At the end of each presentation, children have the opportunity to meet with presenters one-on-one to ask questions or just talk. Some children use this to seek help for personal challenges, family struggles and, sometimes, disclose an assault. In this case KIC takes appropriate action to ensure the child's safety. SafeTalk incorporates the curriculum of the Child Assault Prevention Program (CAPP) under the auspices of the International Assault Prevention Center (ICAP).

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Families

KIC’s TeenTalk program provides in-school crisis prevention/intervention to students in middle and high schools, and 24/7 wraparound support of KIC's phone and in-person counseling and emergency shelter. The overriding goal is to provide critical individualized support and resources to help students navigate difficult circumstances, avoid reaching crisis points, manage crises during and beyond school hours, achieve academic success, and optimize their chances of achieving safe, productive futures. KIC's trained, experienced, Master's-level TeenTalk mental health counselors work full-time in each school. Every encounter between a student and TeenTalk Counselor (TTC) prevents a potential suicide, self-harm, or violence to others. TeenTalk has two primary objectives: 1) Immediate crisis stabilization; and 2) Strengths and resource building for students' long-term functioning and well-being.

With accessible, individualized support from trusted TTCs, students struggling with anxiety, depression, severe family conflict, peer conflict, academic pressures, financial distress, PTSD, substance use, abuse, neglect, rejection, gender/sexual identity issues, homelessness, immigration concerns, grief, etc., learn coping skills, effective communication, self-advocacy, goal-setting, time management skills, etc. As needed, families are engaged in counseling, including home visits. Students and families know that KIC TTCs can maintain greater confidentiality than school staff. TTCs make referrals for higher level/specialized services to trusted providers, facilitate topic groups to address needs of particular student cohorts, and make classroom/school/community-wide presentations to address current concerns. They collaborate with all levels of school staff and provide professional development/crisis training and insight into needs of the student body.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents

Lighthouse provides a safe, welcoming, and supportive weekly meeting for LGBTQ teens. Lighthouse’s inclusive and affirming environment fosters healthy relationships, personal development and the evolution of identity. Adult facilitators create a comfortable space that encourages each member to express themselves and share life experiences in a confidential, non-threatening environment. Lighthouse also hosts guest speakers, trips, barbecues, parties, and movie nights -- programming that is often initiated and planned in conjunction with attendees. For LGBTQ teens who do not join gay straight alliance clubs at schools, and choose not to be open about their identities, Lighthouse can become the only place they can be themselves. Many Lighthouse attendees find friends that they socialize with outside of Lighthouse for the first time without fear of being bullied.

Population(s) Served
LGBTQ people
Adolescents

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of participants counseled

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Families

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Counseling took place in Crisis Helpline, in-person Crisis Outreach, Emergency Shelter, TeenTalk, Juvenile Review Board, InterAgency Team, and SafeTalk.

Number of clients served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Families

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The babies, children, teens, and families were served with one or more of KIC Crisis Helpline, In-person Crisis Outreach, Emergency Shelter, TeenTalk, Juvenile Review Board, InterAgency Team, SafeTalk

Number of youth and families for whom a strengths-based assessment is completed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Families

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

These assessments were completed in Crisis Outreach, Emergency Shelter, Juvenile Review Board, InterAgency Team, and TeenTalk programs.

Number of clients in residential care

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Temporary Emergency Shelter

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context Notes

This number represents 7% of calls to the Crisis Helpline that were deemed true crises for children. In 93% of cases initial and ongoing counseling and referrals enabled kids to remain home safely.

Number of clients participating in support groups

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Support groups took place in the Emergency Shelter, TeenTalk, and Lighthouse programs.

Number of youth and families for whom a cultural inventory (e.g., cultural/ethnic identity, language, values, spiritual life, family traditions, gender and sexual identity issues, other relevant preferences, etc.) is completed and used to develop the treatment and support plan

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Ethnic and racial groups, Family relationships, Health, Social and economic status

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

A cultural inventory was used in developing individual treatment plans for children and youth in the Emergency Shelter Program.

Number of individuals who are receiving timely health/dental exams

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

All children in the Emergency Shelter receive onsite Health Center initial assessments, and treatment and referrals for immediate and ongoing needs throughout their stays and in their discharge plans

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Kids In Crisis' mission is to build healthy communities where children and families thrive through prevention, counseling, and crisis services available 24-hours every day. Kids In Crisis provides free, round-the-clock crisis intervention, counseling, and emergency shelter, prevention programs in 33 local schools and community programs, and advocacy for children and families at the national, regional, state and local levels.

Since 1978, Kids In Crisis has provided 161,000 CT children and their families with critical social services. Kids In Crisis knows well that crisis can happen in any family at any time. Its goals are:

● Children experiencing crisis receive immediate effective intervention and counseling;
● Children with no safe and appropriate alternative placement receive safe, nurturing, shelter and and have safe, supportive discharge plans;
● Children receive all individualized medical, therapeutic, educational, and family services necessary to help stabilize/begin healing from trauma, and facilitate developmental gains
● Kids In Crisis maintains a strong community awareness and presence, providing prevention services to identify problems before children and families reach crisis points; and
● Kids In Crisis takes a leadership role in identifying and advocating for the needs of at-risk children and youth.

"In-house":
Crisis Counselors answer Crisis Helpline calls 24/7 from anyone concerned about the safety or well being of a baby, child, or teen, including the children themselves. Thy assess/de-escalate crises by phone or meeting in person, day or night. As needed, they perform intakes to the Emergency Shelter Program, which provides a safe, nurturing, home-like environment, with cheerful, comfortable bedrooms and common areas, nutritious food, regular schedules of sleep, school, and play, age-appropriate chores, and well-trained, caring, consistent staff. Kids often enter with little or no previous medical care or counseling, and undiagnosed or neglected physical and mental health needs. The onsite Health Center's nurse practitioner, psychologist and psychiatrist identify and address each child's needs throughout their stays in shelter. Kids are referred and accompanied to any needed specialties and services. Each child receives daily, on-site counseling. Needed family work takes place as regularly as achievable. Educational Services and Therapeutic Enrichment activities abound. Staff facilitate children's safe return home. They link families to long-term supports and monitor progress after discharge.

In the community:

● TeenTalk: KIC Master's-level Counselors in 12 middle/high schools provide confidential counseling to students, and preventive education to students, staff, parents, and the larger community.
● SafeTalk: KIC provides an assault/bullying prevention program for K-5 students in their classrooms; and separately to teachers and parents in 22 elementary schools and community sites.
● Safe Place: KIC coordinates local business and civic sites to connect youth in crisis to immediate services.
● Juvenile Review Board, Greenwich a voluntary restorative justice program for youth who have committed a minor first-time offense.
● InterAgency Team: KIC provides case management for a voluntary juvenile justice prevention for identified at-risk students in Greenwich elementary, middle, and high schools.
● Lighthouse: KIC provides a weekly, welcoming, inclusive safe space for LGBTQ youth for support and programing.
● Emotion Locomotion: A social-emotional learning program for young children, led by KIC in schools and programs.
● KidTalk: Crisis prevention and intervention on site at the Boys & Girls Club, Greenwich

Licensed by the CT Dept of Children and Families, Kids iIn Crisis (KIC) remains the only agency in the state providing comprehensive crisis care services and shelter for children of all ages, genders and backgrounds at no cost to families. KIC operates the only shelter for children south of New Haven. Founded in 1978, KIC has provided critical services to 159,000 children and their families.

KIC has received local and national recognition for its work and serves as a model for other social service agencies nationwide. In 1982, KIC received a Private Sector Initiative Commendation from the President of the United States. HUD awarded its 1984 Public-Private Partnership Certificate of National Merit to KIC for “innovative use of a Community Development Block Grant, which served as a model throughout the nation." The Greenwich Bar Association awarded KIC the 2001 Liberty Award, recognizing service for children. In 2003, in recognition of the Agency's 25th anniversary, the Governor proclaimed July 7th Kids in Crisis Day and the state legislature cited the agency for excellence. In 2007, KIC received national recognition as a Merit Finalist of the Mutual of America Community Partnership Award for our onsite Health Clinic. In 2011, ED Shari Shapiro received the “Champion of Children Award" by the Center for Children's Advocacy. In recognition of the KIC's work in Newtown, after the massacre at Sandy Hook Elem. School, the United Way of Western CT awarded Shari the “2013 Advocate Award" for serving as a community role model and challenging others to become involved in advocacy, volunteerism and philanthropy; the Greenwich Chamber of Commerce awarded her the "Community Leader Award," and Newtown Youth and Family Services awarded the H.D. Bassett Award, recognizing outstanding volunteer contributions by Kids In Crisis staff who counseled families.

KIC has respectful collaborative relationships with scores of local police, schools, hospitals, and public and private social services providers. Many local businesses fundraise for us. Counseling staff have degrees in child development and/or psychology ; many have Master's. KIC has consistently maintained fiscal responsibility. A diverse volunteer Board of Directors provides oversight to policies, programs and budgets.

Kids in Crisis' (KIC) 24/7 Crisis Helpline, face-to-face Crisis Interventions, Emergency Shelter Program, and school-based crisis prevention/intervention programs serve thousands of kids a year from all walks of life. Crises can happen in any family, and we never turn anyone away. Since its founding in 1978 the agency has provided services to 161,000 traumatized, homeless, or otherwise crisis-facing newborn to 17-year-old children and their families. In the last fiscal year (7/1/19-6/30/20) KIC provided services to 4,846 Connecticut children and their families. KIC's programs and services are all provided at no cost to children and families:
• Crisis Helpline: 24-hour/7 phone counseling, intervention and referrals. Crisis Prevention Counselors answered 413 calls.
• Crisis Intervention and Outreach: Immediate face-to-face intervention and ongoing support to children and families in their local communities any time of the day or night, any day of the year. In FY2020 Crisis Prevention Counselors conducted 126 face-to-face meetings and ongoing services after initial Crisis Helpline calls.
• Emergency Residential Shelter for newborns to 18 year olds; onsite Health Center; Educational Services; Therapeutic Recreation; and Aftercare. 47 babies to 18 year olds had a total of 1,382 nights of stay.
• TeenTalk: Master's-level Counselors in 13 middle and high schools provided confidential individual, group, and family counseling to help students prevent and/or manage crises and prevent self harm and violence towards others. Counselors also provided education on current adolescent health and well-being issues to parents and communities. Last year TeenTalk served 934 students with one-on-one counseling, and 2,173 with combined services.
• SafeTalk: An age-appropriate assault/bullying prevention program presented to elementary school students. SafeTalk teaches children that everyone is entitled to live "Safe, Strong and Free," and how to protect themselves from danger. In the 2018-'19 school year, KIC presented SafeTalk to 5,035 students in Fairfield County. After each presentation children can meet one-on-one with presenters; revelations about abuse have happened, and KIC has then ensured the children's safety and well-being (several arrests have resulted).
• Safe Place: Area businesses and civic sites connect youth to immediate crisis support services.
• Juvenile Review Board, Greenwich: KIC provides case management for this Greenwich Police and DSS Dept. restorative justice initiative, which provides an alternative to court for youth who have committed a minor first-time offense.
• InterAgency Team: KIC provides case management for preventive interventions for identified at-risk youth in Greenwich elementary, middle, and high schools.
• KidTalk: KIC onsite afterschool mental health counseling at Boys & Girls Club, Greenwich

In addition, KIC staff serve on 30 national, state, and local children/family advocacy task forces.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback

Financials

Kids In Crisis, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Kids In Crisis, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 04/10/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Suzanne Koroshetz

Kids In Crisis

Joanne Mortimer

LMHC Prime Care Behavioral Health Services

Tanya Smith

Attorney

Jeffrey Palma

State Street Global Advisors

Bill Pierz Pierz

Shoff Darby

Jami Sherwood

Simply Signs

Angela Swift

Compass

Joseph Chu

RBC Wealth Management

Michael Case

Barclay Damon LLP

Tom Davidson

Encina Capital Partners

Karen Hopp

Bazini Hopp

Kate Laverge

Viacom International Media Networks

Blake Holden

Warburg Pincus

Eric Jordan

Goldman Sachs

Heidi Nolte

Tamara Houston

Cory Solomon

Rosemarie Lanard

Suzanne Koroshetz

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 11/23/2020

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 01/25/2024

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.