Horizons National Student Enrichment Program Inc.

Inspiring Minds. Building Community. Transforming Lives

aka Horizons National   |   Westport, CT   |  www.horizonsnational.org

Mission

We advance educational equity by building long-term partnerships with students, families, communities, and schools to create experiences outside of school that inspire the joy of learning.

Ruling year info

1997

Chief Executive Officer

Ms. Lorna Smith

Main address

120 Post Road West Suite 202

Westport, CT 06880 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Horizons Student Enrichment Program, Inc.

EIN

06-1468129

NTEE code info

Youth Development Programs (O50)

Youth Development Programs (O50)

Youth Development Programs (O50)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Horizons National supports a network of out-of-school academic, enrichment, and social emotional learning programs that serve children in under-resourced communities from pre-kindergarten until college. By providing high-quality learning experiences and support outside of the traditional school year, our program is proven to close the opportunity gap. Horizons students experience the joy of learning, practice the skills for success, and discover the inspiration to realize their dreams.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Horizons National

Horizons National is a nonprofit that partners with public, independent, and charter schools, colleges, and universities to create out-of-school academic, enrichment, and social-emotional learning programs for students from pre-kindergarten through high school.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Families

Where we work

Affiliations & memberships

National Summer Learning Association 2010

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Rate of student attendance during the reporting period

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Children and youth, Families

Related Program

Horizons National

Type of Metric

Other - describing something else

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

For context, a 2016 RAND Corporation report considered 75% attendance rate a marker of a high quality summer learning program. Due to the pandemic, daily attendance was not tracked in 2020 & 2021

Number of students per classroom during the reporting period

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Horizons National

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

These are the total numbers of students served across the Horizons network. In 2020, students and families were served through Horizons at Home.

Number of students per teacher during the reporting period

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

The individual needs of young people are addressed in a classroom that has at minimum a 5:1 student-to-educator ratio.

Number of students who demonstrate the desire to succeed in the academic setting

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of students showing interest in topics related to STEM

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of administrators and staff who plan and experience professional development activities together

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

For our professional educators, Horizons provides a unique professional experience that encourages transformational teaching, individualized curriculum, and experiential learning for students.

Number of teachers retained after 12 months

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

We believe all children should have the opportunity to discover the joy of learning. The first Horizons program began in 1964 at New Canaan Country School with the goal to keep local public school students learning during the summer months. After decades of success building a hands-on learning community, Horizons National was formed in 1995 to bring the Horizons program to more students and families across the country.

Over the past 25+ years, Horizons National has built partnerships with schools, families, and communities in 19 states to expand our programs and reach more students. Along the way, Horizons' hallmark 6-week summer program has engaged over 10,000 students from Pre-K through high school, who return to the program each year for project-based literacy, art, and STEM learning, field trips, swimming, healthy living, and community building in a joyful, supportive environment.

Each year, Horizons National forms new relationships and partnerships to continue growing our Network. We invest resources to ensure each new affiliate program is strong and sustainable from the start, and support program success over the long-term with peer-to-peer learning, material development, fundraising opportunities, and more.

Horizons programs operate in over 40 cities across the country, serving more than 6,000 students. As a decentralized Network of local affiliates supported by Horizons National, Horizons offers affiliates a flexible recipe for success: rather than requiring a strict fidelity to a standard curriculum, Horizons affiliates are encouraged to customize their program to reflect the unique resources of their community, while still maintaining the integrity of the Horizons program model and approach to student success. This approach allows for strong local program ownership, giving each affiliate the opportunity to form deep community ties, to respond directly to the needs of their students, and to represent the diversity, challenges, and strengths of the districts they serve.

The decentralized Horizons model is both highly effective and cost-efficient. Rather than losing ground over the summer, Horizons students gain 40% more growth in reading and math over the 6-week session for less than the cost of the same amount of time in school. Plus, our initial investment in an affiliate yields a seven-fold ROI at affiliate maturity.

Our ongoing services to affiliates across the Network include:
• Strategic planning expertise
• Board development and support
• Annual Meeting and Conference
• Program materials
• Monthly training and Professional Development opportunities
• Marketing and communications
• Central data management (assessment, analysis, database)
• Quality assurance
• Network-wide fundraising
• A clearinghouse for great ideas & resources

At Horizons, we are committed to positive results for our students, families, and communities. In a recent study of 5 years of school district data for Horizons students and their peers, Horizons students achieved significantly:

• Higher attendance rates
• Lower rates of chronic absenteeism
• Higher scores on standardized assessments of elementary math and science
• Higher GPAs in 9th grade
• More course credit earned in 9th and 10th grade
• Fewer incidents of repeating a grade
• Fewer disciplinary referrals

Every year, our students gain an average of 8-12 weeks of grade equivalency in reading and math over their 6-week summer session.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome,

Financials

Horizons National Student Enrichment Program Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Horizons National Student Enrichment Program Inc.

Board of directors
as of 4/25/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Ms. Vicki Craver

no affiliation

Term: 2020 -


Board co-chair

Mr. Eric Cochran

Amy Downer

Lyn McNaught

Jane Williams

Nicholas Thacher

Ned Mandel

Eric Cochran

Mary Brock

Gary Cohen

Leslie Littlejohn

Monica Lamontagne

Erick Hong

Vicki Craver

Rick Frazier

Lindsay Galin

Melissa Hughes

Noelle King

Scott Lauretti

Rebecca Owen

Jon Michael Reese

Melinda Rolfs

Roland Smart

Mark Steffensen

J. Ronald Totaro

Ricky Van Veen

Dennis Williams

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 12/02/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data