PLATINUM2023

International Center for Journalists, Inc.

It Takes a Journalist

aka ICFJ   |   Washington, DC   |  www.icfj.org

Mission

We enable a global network of journalists to provide the trustworthy news essential to free and strong societies. Their vital work strengthens democratic ideals and spurs change. At ICFJ, we serve more than 160,000 journalists around the world, helping them cover the most critical issues of today, innovate to deeply connect with communities, and build news organizations that thrive.

Ruling year info

1985

President

Ms. Sharon Moshavi

Main address

750 17th St. NW Ste 300

Washington, DC 20006 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

11-2724905

NTEE code info

Media, Communications Organizations (A30)

International Exchanges (Q23)

Management & Technical Assistance (A02)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2022, 2021 and 2020.
Register now

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

This profile needs more info.

If it is your nonprofit, add a problem overview.

Login and update

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

The Knight International Journalism Fellowships

The ICFJ Knight Fellowships are designed to instill a culture of news innovation and experimentation worldwide. Fellows primarily work with newsrooms to seed new ideas and services that deepen coverage, expand news delivery and engage citizens, with the ultimate goal to improve people’s lives. They work in countries where there is a good opportunity to create the news media of the future.

The program is funded by John S. and James L. Knight Foundation. With additional support from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, Fellows have empowered journalists in sub-Saharan Africa and India to use the latest digital tools to tell compelling stories and engage audiences on health, development and gender issues.

Our Fellows comprise a global network of digital entrepreneurs and visionaries who are transforming journalism and producing lasting, tangible change. They work in key areas of innovation such as newsroom transformation, entrepreneurship and business models, technology creation and adoption, data-driven investigations, new models of storytelling, audience engagement and digital security.

Each project is designed to ensure that the impacts and achievements last beyond the Fellowship. Fellowships are typically a minimum of one year, and may be extended by ICFJ depending on funding and the opportunity for greater impact.

Fellows lead projects in Asia, Eastern Europe/Eurasia, Latin America, Middle East/North Africa and/or Sub-Saharan African. Fellows are also bringing their innovations to U.S. newsrooms and journalists.

Fellows work on multiple, complementary projects. Examples of Fellowship projects have included:

- Forming a news organization’s first innovation team to produce major digital projects using new
storytelling formats and tools such as 360-degree video

- Guiding the redesign of a newsroom to foster new forms of cross-team collaboration and workflows for greater efficiency and experimentation that delivers higher-quality content

- Launching an online school that offers business courses aimed at improving the sustainability of news startups

- Leading an innovation challenge that seeds disruptive digital ideas to improve the way that news is collected and disseminated using tools like bots, drones, sensors and mobile apps

- Creating a major newspaper’s first branded series that examines important societal issues like education, health and business through a gender perspective

ICFJ Knight Fellows also act as “thought leaders,” sharing their experiences and lessons learned on the Knight International Media Innovators page on IJNet.org, and speaking at top conferences focusing on media and information innovation.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Researchers

The International Journalists' Network (IJNet) is an online publication that provides resources and opportunities for working journalists around the world. A project of the International Center for Journalists, IJNet features daily reported articles with tips and tools, as well as expert-written resources, all available in eight languages — Arabic, Chinese, English, French, Persian, Portuguese, Russian and Spanish. More than 180,000 media professionals visit the site each month, and over 92,000 subscribe to the weekly newsletter across all languages. IJNet also tracks opportunities for grants, scholarships, trainings, fellowships, awards and other opportunities for journalists in more than 150 countries, collecting them all on the website and amplifying them throughout the network. Support for IJNet comes from the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, the National Endowment for Democracy, Department of State Bureau of Near Eastern Affairs, Gannett and friends of ICFJ. For more information, please visit www.ijnet.org.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Researchers
Self-employed people

Where we work

Affiliations & memberships

Online News Association Community Award 2021

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of multi-year grants received

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

We average around 3-5 a year. We have grants that cover specific program requirements as well as our Knight Fellows work.

Number of competition entrants

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of job skills training courses/workshops conducted

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

In any given year, ICFJ runs around 60-70 programs. We also provide workshops taught by our Knight Fellows that are based on the need we see in a community to teach a certain skill.

Number of new grants received

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context Notes

We receive a wide range of funding from governmental agencies, corporations and foundations.

Number of attendees present at rallies/events

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

In 2022 we held both in-person and virtual events so our numbers increased.

Number of donations made by board members

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Many of our board members actively donate around $250-$500 for campaigns/events, and for our larger fundraiser, purchase sponsorships. These numbers reflect an estimate of donations from each year.

Number of participants reporting greater issue awareness

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

After all of our programs and workshops, we issue a survey to participants asking for answers on effectiveness. We have a great success rate with participants learning and enhancing new skills.

Number of participants attending course/session/workshop

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context Notes

In person, we normally have around 30-45 participants for smaller workshops. For some of our larger workshops, we can have anywhere from 100-200 as well as online viewers.

Number of return website visitors

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We measure analytics for both our website and MailChimp blasts. We have a large number of return donors on our website, as well as new traffic researching programs and applications.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

We enable a global network of journalists to provide the trustworthy news essential to free and strong societies.
Their vital work strengthens democratic ideals and spurs change. At ICFJ, we serve more than 160,000 journalists around the world, helping them cover the most critical issues of today, innovate to deeply connect with communities, and build news organizations that thrive.

At ICFJ, we know “it takes a journalist.” That’s why we support journalists worldwide as they face immense challenges: online and physical attacks, disinformation, an erosion of trust, an ever-changing media landscape, and threats to their freedom and their lives.

We equip news media to address these challenges, building skills and fostering connections among our vibrant, global network. ICFJ programs include a mix of training, mentorship, fellowships and financial support. We focus our efforts on three strategic areas vital to the future health of journalism and those it informs:

We SERVE reporters and editors, giving them the tools and knowledge to cover the most critical issues of today.
We help journalists INNOVATE, using new tools and techniques to build trust and engage with communities.
We help independent newsrooms THRIVE financially, adopting effective business models to ensure they can serve their purpose well into the future.

Our Guiding Values
Our values govern our decision-making and inform how we operate in pursuit of our mission. We believe that:

Journalism is a pillar of democracy. By reporting in the public interest, journalists equip people with the information they need to participate in the democratic process.

Independence is non-negotiable. All of the journalistic projects ICFJ supports maintain editorial independence. Operating free of outside influence is fundamental to journalism.

Accountability matters. We support reporting that holds the powerful to account. We also hold ourselves to account, operating at the highest standards for our profession.

Inclusion makes us stronger. We strive to make ICFJ and our programming welcoming and supportive of all people. We work to expand the diversity of voices shaping news coverage and those reflected in it.

Trustworthiness is foundational. Without trust in news and its institutions, journalism cannot serve its highest purpose. We prioritize trust-building in the work we do with our network.

Collaboration is a priority. ICFJ is committed to fostering a healthy exchange of ideas so we can surface and share solutions across borders.

Bold thinking is a must. It empowers us to harness our creativity to experiment, innovate and embrace continuous learning.

As an organization for journalists built by journalists, ICFJ has offered support and resources to the news media for nearly four decades. Our network members help their communities make better informed decisions, expand understanding, and call out abuses of power. What they do is vital to improve and even save lives. Our network is 160,000+ journalists strong.

Our Impact
We leverage our global network to ensure that great ideas and learnings spread exponentially. Our one-of-a-kind International Journalists’ Network (IJNet) publishes journalism training opportunities, tips and trends in eight languages. Our cutting-edge research finds solutions that shape the future of independent and trustworthy public-interest journalism – and also informs our own work.

As an organization for journalists built by journalists, ICFJ has offered support and resources to the news media for nearly four decades. Our network members help their communities make better informed decisions, expand understanding, and call out abuses of power. What they do is vital to improve and even save lives.

With ICFJ’s support, journalists in our network have:
Exposed the misuse of billions of dollars in public funds, putting corrupt officials behind bars and resulting in better laws.
Increased and deepened coverage of marginalized communities and under-reported stories.
Improved their news organizations’ audience reach and business operations, toward greater sustainability.
Over the last five years alone, ICFJ has operated in 125 countries. Learn more about our programs and see our latest impact report.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time

Financials

International Center for Journalists, Inc.
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

International Center for Journalists, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 08/30/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Michael Golden

Former Vice Chairman, The New York Times Company

Michael Golden

The New York Times Company

James F. Hoge Jr.

Teneo Intelligence

Pamela Howard

Scripps Howard Foundation

Matthew Winkler

Bloomberg News

John Maxwell Hamilton

Manship School of Mass Communication, Louisiana State University

Jason Wright

Geer Mountain Holdings LLC

Marcy McGinnis

CBS News

Mark Bailen

First Amendment Attorney, Mark I. Bailen PC

David Callaway

Callaway Climate Insights

Alex S. Jones

Shorenstein Center at Harvard's John F. Kennedy School of Government

Rik Kirkland

McKinsey and Co.

Joanne Leedom-Ackerman

Novelist and Journalist

Rob Rehg

Edelman

Wendell Reilly

Berman Capital Advisors

Mary Ann Sternberg

Nonfiction Author

John Towriss

Envoy Strategy Group

Carrie Budoff Brown

“Meet the Press”, NBC News

Anne Kornblut

Meta

Marci McCue

Flipboard

Ahmed Charai

Global Media Holding

David Elliot Cohen

Author and Publisher

John Daniszewski

Associated Press

Michael Greeenspon

The New York Times Company

Rodman Moorhead

Warburg Pincus & Co.

Brent Jones

The Wall Street Journal

Lauretta J. Bruno

Gramercy Partners LLC

Sudeep Reddy

POLITICO

Krissah Thompson

The Washington Post

Jose Zamora

Exile Content Studio

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No